Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I can style every 4th 'item' div like so

  jQuery(".item:nth-child(4n)").addClass("fourth-item");

and that works fine, but then I hide some items, show some others and want to re-do this styling, but only styling every 4th item that is visible. So I have a function that will remove this styling and reapply it, but I need to specify in the reapplying of the style that it is only every 4th visible item, not every 4th item. I know the ":visible" selector but can't seen to chain it with the nth-child selector properly, any ideas?

I've tried various things like this to no avail...

jQuery(".item").removeClass("fourth-item");
jQuery(".item:visible:nth-child(4n)").addClass("fourth-item");
share|improve this question
up vote 22 down vote accepted

:nth-child scans the children of the parent no matter what their styling is. The counting in :nth-child is relative to the parent element, not the previous selector. This is explained in the jQeury docs for :nth-child:

With :nth-child(n), all children are counted, regardless of what they are, and the specified element is selected only if it matches the selector attached to the pseudo-class.

Using a more simple method with each does exactly what you want:

$('#test li:visible').each(function (i) {
    if (i % 4 == 0) $(this).addClass('fourth-item');
});
share|improve this answer
1  
thanks, think that should actually be (i+1)%4 though :) – mbehan Feb 1 '10 at 10:17
1  
Well, it depends! Note that nth-child is 1 based, while here i is 0 based. – Emil Ivanov Feb 1 '10 at 10:42
    
Perfect answer. I did have to use @mbehan's suggestion of i + 1 for it to work as expected on every 4th element. – Ryan Feb 9 '12 at 0:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.