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my R code ends up containing plethora of statements of the form:

if (!is.null(aVariable)) { 
     do whatever 
}

But this kind of statement is hard to read because it contains two negations. I would prefer something like:

 if (is.defined(aVariable)) { 
      do whatever 
 }

Does a is.defined type function that does the opposite of !is.null exist standard in R?

cheers, yannick

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1  
Where does aVariable come from? is it an element in a vector, a global or non-vector argument to a function? I may have more suggestions. –  Alex Brown Feb 1 '10 at 10:44
    
perhaps 'exists' is close to what you are looking for –  Ian Fellows Feb 1 '10 at 17:08
1  
see Harlan's comment below about 'exists'... –  Yannick Wurm Feb 2 '10 at 11:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You may be better off working out what value type your function or code accepts, and asking for that:

if (is.integer(aVariable))
{
  do whatever
}

This may be an improvement over isnull, because it provides type checking. On the other hand, it may reduce the genericity of your code.

Alternatively, just make the function you want:

is.defined = function(x)!is.null(x)
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1  
The name is.defined isn't quite right since you can declare a variable with the value NULL. Try, e.g. x <- NULL; x. isnt.null would be a more appropriate name for the function. –  Richie Cotton Feb 2 '10 at 12:19
    
in perl, at least, a variable is considered not defined if it has the value undef, which is like null. –  Alex Brown Feb 2 '10 at 17:16

Ian put this in the comment, but I think it's a good answer:

if (exists("aVariable"))
{
  do whatever
}

note that the variable name is quoted.

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7  
I don't think this is the same. exists tests whether the variable is bound. is.null assumes the variable is bound, and tests whether or not its content is the object NULL. They're not interchangeable. –  Harlan Feb 1 '10 at 22:02

If it's just a matter of easy reading, you could always define your own function :

is.not.null <- function(x) ! is.null(x)

So you can use it all along your program.

is.not.null(3)
is.not.null(NULL)
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I'm a fan of:

ifelse(is.na("aVariable") == TRUE, trueCondition, falseCondition)
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3  
Who said anything about is.na? Also, the syntax is wrong for 3 reasons -- you forgot to negate, you shouldn't use quotes and you do not need the == TRUE part -- I think you mean !is.na(aVariable). Anyway, this is a bad idea because ifelse is vectorized. So, if aVariable is a vector, trueCondition will be executed many times. –  GSee Aug 8 '12 at 23:02

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