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I have been developing with WebApi and have moved on to WebApi2 where Microsoft has introduced a new IHttpActionResult Interface that seems to recommended to be used over returning a HttpResponseMessage. I am confused on the advantages of this new Interface. It seems to mainly just provide a SLIGHTLY easier way to create a HttpResponseMessage.

I would make the argument that this is "abstraction for the sake of abstraction". Am I missing something? What is the real world advantages I get from using this new Interface besides maybe saving a line of code?

Old way (WebApi):

public HttpResponseMessage Delete(int id)
{
    var status = _Repository.DeleteCustomer(id);
    if (status)
    {
        return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
    }
    else
    {
        throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);
    }
}

New Way (WebApi2):

public IHttpActionResult Delete(int id)
{
    var status = _Repository.DeleteCustomer(id);
    if (status)
    {
        //return new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.OK);
        return Ok();
    }
    else
    {
        //throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound);
        return NotFound();
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

You might decide not to use IHttpActionResult because your existing code builds a HttpResponseMessage that doesn't fit one of the canned responses. You can however adapt HttpResponseMessage to IHttpActionResult using the canned response of ResponseMessage. It took me awhile to figure this out, so I wanted to post it showing that you don't necesarily have to chose one or the other:

public IHttpActionResult SomeAction()
{
   IHttpActionResult response;
   //we want a 303 with the ability to set location
   HttpResponseMessage responseMsg = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.RedirectMethod);
   responseMsg.Headers.Location = new Uri("http://customLocation.blah");
   response = ResponseMessage(responseMsg);
   return response;
}
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1  
Just what I needed. Cheers AaronLS ! –  JTech May 13 at 11:18
1  
This is just what I wanted. Thanks!.. –  Krishh Jul 14 at 22:16

You can still use HttpResponseMessage. That capability will not go away. I felt the same way as you and argued extensively with the team that there was no need for an additional abstraction. There were a few arguments thrown around to try and justify its existence but nothing that convinced me that it was worthwhile.

That is, until I saw this sample from Brad Wilson. If you construct IHttpActionResult classes in a way that can be chained, you gain the ability to create a "action-level" response pipeline for generating the HttpResponseMessage. Under the covers, this is how ActionFilters are implemented however, the ordering of those ActionFilters is not obvious when reading the action method which is one reason I'm not a fan of action filters.

However, by creating IHttpActionResults that can be explicitly chained in your action method you can compose all kinds of different behaviour to generate your response.

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This is just my personal opinion and folks from web API team can probably articulate it better but here is my 2c.

First of all, I think it is not a question of one over another. You can use them both depending on what you want to do in your action method but in order to understand the real power of IHttpActionResult, you will probably need to step outside those convenient helper methods of ApiController such as Ok, NotFound, etc.

Basically, I think a class implementing IHttpActionResult as a factory of HttpResponseMessage. With that mind set, it now becomes an object that need to be returned and a factory that produces it. In general programming sense, you can create the object yourself in certain cases and in certain cases, you need a factory to do that. Same here.

If you want to return a response which needs to be constructed through a complex logic, say lots of response headers, etc, you can abstract all those logic into an action result class implementing IHttpActionResult and use it in multiple action methods to return response.

Another advantage of using IHttpActionResult as return type is that it makes ASP.NET Web API action method similar to MVC. You can return any action result without getting caught in media formatters.

Of course, as noted by Darrel, you can chain action results and create a powerful micro-pipeline similar to message handlers themselves in the API pipeline. This you will need depending on the complexity of your action method.

Long story short - it is not IHttpActionResult versus HttpResponseMessage. Basically, it is how you want to create the response. Do it yourself or through a factory.

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The problem I had with the factory justfication is that I can easily create static methods like ResponseFactory.CreateOkResponse() that return HttpResponseMessage, and I didn't have to deal with the async stuff when creating the response. One team member did mention the fact that the async can be useful if you need to do I/O in order to generate header values. Not sure how often that happens though. –  Darrel Miller Feb 13 at 17:32
    
I think it is same as saying why do we need factory method pattern. Why not just use static methods to create objects. Sure, it is doable - every object creation does not merit a proper factory pattern. But then IMHO it depends on how you want to model your classes. Do you want to have logic to create different types of responses all crammed into a class in the form of multiple static methods or have different classes based on an interface. Again, there is no good or bad. It all depends. Anyways, my point is that it is not one over another and I personally like factory thing better :) –  Badri Feb 13 at 17:53
return ResponseMessage(httpResponseMessage); // Will return HttpResponseMessage as IHttpActionResult
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