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I'm trying to make a C++ function that accepts an unknown number of parameters total, but that they are always paired with specific types.

// logically, this is what the template Pair would be
// template<int, std::string> struct Pair {};

// desired:
// accept a const char * as a first parameter, and then in pairs ...
//     integer, const char *
template <typename... Arguments> unsigned int onlyInPairs
    (const std::string name, const Arguments& ... args)  {

    const unsigned numargs = sizeof...(Arguments);
    // more magic would happen here with the parameters :)
    return numargs;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    // only string, [num, string] [num, string] should work

    // desire that the syntax be as simple as shown, and not require
    // extra classes to be created (like a Tuple) for each pair.

    // this should work...
    auto count = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", 2, "HIJ"); // works

    // this should not work, as it's not number, string
    count = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", "NOTRIGHT", 2); 
    return 0;
}

I've looked at parameter packs (reference), but can't seem to apply the documentation I've found to my specific problem. I'd like to try to catch the problem at compile time if the parameters are not specified correctly.

The goal was to use a syntax that was free of template noise as much as possible as the "pairs" will always be this way (and the programmer will know that). So, we wanted to just have int, string (repeat).

Ideally, the solution would work with Visual Studio 2013's C++ compiler, but I'd accept any answer that works and demonstrates the current possible shortcomings of VS C++ related to this issue.

Appendix - More details

The code being written would ultimately be often read by tech-savvy, but not formally trained C/C++ programmers (like a technical support). So, we're trying to get it to be distraction free as much as possible. There can be 2-16 pairs of values ... so keeping it distraction free and just the data is desirable.

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1  
Why not using std::Pair Template class? cplusplus.com/reference/utility/pair –  Nick L. Feb 13 at 15:47
1  
Constraining template argument types is typically a non-trivial task (that's why there are proposal for a standardized, simple way to write template constraints for C++17). A first step for simplification could be to pass std:pairs. Still, you'd had to check via static_assert or SFINAE for convertibility of the arguments to the wanted types. –  dyp Feb 13 at 15:49
    
@NickL - It is a desire to not use extra templates/classes in the call to the function that distract from the data. –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 15:53
    
I'm only speaking for myself, but I generally find hand-rolled code more distracting than using standard libraries. Part of that is I always assume that if a programmer hand-rolled something, they did so because the standard library didn't meet their needs; not because they found the standard library distracting. –  Max Lybbert Feb 13 at 15:58
1  
OK -- care to share why the downvote? What makes this a bad question? I'd like to fix it to make it better. –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's one possibility. Class template Enforce recursively inherits from itself and applies static_assert on pairs of template arguments until the specialization is picked that doesn't do anything:

#include <type_traits>
#include <string>

template<typename...Args>
struct Enforce;

template<typename T, typename T1, typename T2, typename... Args>
struct Enforce<T, T1, T2, Args...> : Enforce<T, Args...> {
    static_assert( std::is_constructible<T, T2>::value, "Wrong T2!");
};

template<typename T>
struct Enforce<T> {
};


template <typename... Arguments>
void onlyInPairs (const std::string name, const Arguments& ... args)
{
    Enforce<std::string, Arguments...>();
}


int main()
{
    onlyInPairs("this", 1, "works", 2, "fine");
    //onlyInPairs("this", 1, "doesn't", 2, 3);
}

Instead of recursive inheritance, you can use recursive typedef instead. At least in gcc, that ought to compile faster and with less noise (warning about non-virtual destructor in base class, etc.).

EDIT:

Here's another version that ANDs the checks together and saves the result:

template<typename...Args>
struct Enforce;

template<typename T, typename T1, typename T2, typename... Args>
struct Enforce<T, T1, T2, Args...> {
    static const bool value =
        std::is_constructible<T,T2>::value &&
        Enforce<T, Args...>::value;
};

template<typename T>
struct Enforce<T> : std::true_type {
};

Now you can move the assert closer, inside onlyInPairs:

template <typename... Arguments>
void onlyInPairs (const std::string name, const Arguments& ... args)
{
    static_assert( Enforce<std::string, Arguments...>::value , "Wrong second arg..." );
}
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@dyp You're right, that's better, fixed. And now I can remove the casts :) Thanks for heads up. –  jrok Feb 13 at 16:10
    
Very interesting! I like the use of static_assert. Any way to get the compile error to point at the offending line of code rather than the static_assert failure? –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:13
    
If you want to reduce compilation times, you can use the indices trick and do sideways (multiple) inheritance. Differentiate between odd and even indices (or use a metafunction). –  dyp Feb 13 at 16:18
    
static_assert is not needed. I do not see request that the first argument has to be constructible from the 3rd –  BЈовић Feb 13 at 16:23
    
@BЈовић The idea is to error out if the second argument of the pair is not a string (or can't be converted to). We can achieve the same thing with function overloading, but with less pretty error messages. –  jrok Feb 13 at 16:35

What template noise do you speak of?

void onlyInPairs(std::initializer_list<std::pair<int, std::string>>&& pairs) {}

int main() {
    onlyInPairs({
        {1, "abc"},
        {2, "def"},
        {3, "foo"},
    });
}
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I'd admittedly forgotten about the short initializer option. Can this be used without the outer list (and avoiding creating an unnecessary list)? –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:49
    
@WiredPrairie I don't think so, braced-init-list cannot be used for template type deduction, and thus cannot be forwarded. Don't worry though, std::initializer_list doesn't have any real overhead, aside from you having to move or copy it's elements, as opposed to direct construction via forwarded arguments. –  yuri kilochek Feb 13 at 17:13

Use compile time recursion:

void processArgPairs() {
    // to stop recursion
}

template <typename Arg1, typename Arg2, typename... Arguments>
void processArgPairs(Arg1 a, Arg2 b, Arguments&& ...args){
    static_assert(std::is_constructible<int, Arg1>::value, "Wrong type of first argument - int expected");
    static_assert(std::is_constructible<std::string, Arg2>::value, "Wrong type of second argument - string expected

    processArgPairs(std::forward<Arguments>(args)...);
}

template <typename... Arguments> unsigned int onlyInPairs
    (const std::string name, Arguments&& ... args)  {

    const unsigned numargs = sizeof...(Arguments);
    processArgPairs(std::forward<Arguments>(args)...);
    return numargs;
}
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2  
You should use perfect forwarding, otherwise you might get unwanted copies (at least, semantically). –  dyp Feb 13 at 16:19
    
@dyp Good call! –  Johny Feb 13 at 16:27
    
Can't get this one to compile -- "processArgPairs": function does not take 4 arguments? –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:47

Something like this?

template <typename... Arguments> 
unsigned int onlyInPairs(const std::string name, const Arguments& ... args)  
{

    const unsigned numargs = sizeof...(Arguments);
    check(args...);
    return numargs;
}
template <typename... Arguments>
void check(const int i, const std::string name, const Arguments& ... args)
{
    check(args...);
}
void check(const int i, const std::string name)
{

}

int main()
{
    auto count = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", 2, "HIJ"); // works

    count = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", "NOTRIGHT", 2); //compile error
    return 0;
}
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Maybe -- it doesn't compile with Visual Studio 2013. Did you expect it to? error C2665: 'check' : none of the 2 overloads could convert all the argument types. It's pointing to the check(args...) call. –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:02
    
It compiles fine without the second call: count = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", "NOTRIGHT", 2); –  awesomeyi Feb 13 at 16:03
    
Ah. It does in fact. But the error isn't pointing at the line that caused it. Interesting. That could be a real challenge. –  WiredPrairie Feb 13 at 16:05

This is a fairly old-school solution: using is_convertible should be cleaner

#include <string>

template <typename... Args> struct EnforcePairsHelper;
// terminal case
template <> struct EnforcePairsHelper<> {
    enum { size = 0 };
};
// multiple specializations for reliable matching:
// only the last is really required here
template <typename... ArgTail>
struct EnforcePairsHelper<int, const char *, ArgTail...> {
    enum { size = 2 + EnforcePairsHelper<ArgTail...>::size };
};
template <typename... ArgTail>
struct EnforcePairsHelper<int, char *, ArgTail...> {
    enum { size = 2 + EnforcePairsHelper<ArgTail...>::size };
};
template <int N, typename... ArgTail>
struct EnforcePairsHelper<int, char [N], ArgTail...> {
    enum { size = 2 + EnforcePairsHelper<ArgTail...>::size };
};

template <typename... Args> unsigned onlyInPairs (const std::string name,
                                                  const Args& ... args) {

    const unsigned numargs = EnforcePairsHelper<Args...>::size;

    // more magic would happen here with the parameters :)
    return numargs;
}

int main() {
    unsigned ok = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", 2, "HIJ");
    // unsigned no = onlyInPairs("ABC", 1, "DEF", "NOTRIGHT", 2);
}
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