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I have a solution in VS 2010 containing 5 C# projects, 1 C++ project and 1 VB project. My solution has a solution folder "Dependencies" that replicates a file-system folder with the same name. The solution folder has a number of .dll files and some .xml files in it.

When I build my solution, all but one of the .dll files are copied from that folder to my output directory. I've looked at the file in Visual Studio for Copy Local property that is referenced here, the property is not there for any of that files in that folder.

I've looked at all the projects in my solution, and none of them are actually referencing that dll directly which I'm assuming is why it's not being copied. The problem lies in that one of the dlls that IS referenced by one of my projects depends on the dll not being copied.

I tried to add the problem dll as a reference in my projects and I get the following error

A reference to "dll" could not be added, Please make sure that the file is accessible, and that it is a valid assembly or COM component.

I don't really care if it's a COM component or that it's valid etc... because I need it to output.

My question is: How can I beat Visual Studio into submission and force it to copy the dll?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No need to beat anything, just add the DLL to one of the projects with Project + Add Existing Item. Any will do but you'd normally favor the one that has the dependency on this DLL. Your EXE project if you are not sure. it isn't clear if it matters, but use the arrow on the Add button to select "Add as Link" so the file doesn't get copied to the project directory. Afterwards, select it and change its Copy to Output Directory property to "Copy if Newer".

Do keep an eye on source control, this DLL probably needs to be checked-in. So having it in the dependent project directory is actually a good place for it.

Using xcopy.exe in a Post-Build event is otherwise a general way to copy dependent files that the build system doesn't know about or puts in the wrong place.

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Why didn't I just think of adding it as a Link?... Either way, I added it (and VS didn't complain). It's already been checked into source control from that dependencies folder so I don't anticipate any more issues. I'm working on something else right now but I'll come back and mark answered when I can fully test it with my build server. –  Brandon Feb 13 at 16:56
    
I just verified on my build server. Works. Thanks a bunch –  Brandon Feb 14 at 15:24

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