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I want to validate a password using regular expression in c#.

These are the conditions :

  1. should not start with digit or special character
  2. should not end with special character
  3. must contain any of these three at least once('@','#','_') and no other special characters are allowed.
  4. must contain at least one letter
  5. must contain at least one digit
  6. length should be minimum 8 character

Here is my try :

^(?=.*[A-Za-z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*[@#_])

I know it is not even close to satisfy the above mentioned conditions. So please can anyone modify this regex so that it satisfies all the above conditions.

Thanks in advance.

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7  
a simple c# method would be easier to read, easier to maintain. –  L.B Feb 13 at 17:04
2  
Not answering your question, but just wanted to mention this tool that is very useful for testing regular expressions... gskinner.com/RegExr –  KristoferA Feb 13 at 17:07
    
Sorry for being slightly off-topic here, but are rules 1, 2 and the second part of 3 ("no other special characters are allowed") really necessary? Personally, I hate password restrictions like that! And I do not see a reason for them. –  gehho Feb 14 at 9:49
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Give this a whirl

^(?i)(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[@#_])[a-z][a-z0-9@#_]{6,}[a-z0-9]$

Fits your specification I believe. From the look of your current regex youll be able to understand it but if not comment and ill explain.

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Thanks. Can you explain this part : "[a-z][a-z0-9@#_]{6}[a-z0-9]" –  Ajay Feb 13 at 17:14
    
This will mean the password can only begin with a letter(no digit or special character)[a-z]. Then 6 more characters that are either number letter or @,#,_ [a-z0-9@#_]{6}. The {6} means repeat previous items 6 times. And finally end with no special character so only letter or number [a-z0-9]. This all together will be 8 characters. –  Srb1313711 Feb 13 at 17:17
    
Someone commented a good regex tester on your question, try giving any responses a test there:-) –  Srb1313711 Feb 13 at 17:20
    
Will this expression work with passwords > 8 characters, as per the requirement 6 "6.length should be minimum 8 character"? –  ShellShock Feb 13 at 17:28
    
Oops yes it will now missed the comma after the 6! Thanks for raising this! –  Srb1313711 Feb 13 at 17:30
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Others have suggested regex answers for you and maybe that's an immovable constraint of your problem. However, this chunk of C# does what you ask and is different from the regular expressions in that it is far more readable. I would expect a junior level programmer to be able to read it and understand it (and it's also easier to modify it to, say, not return false but return null on success and a string describing how the password fails). It also runs in O(n) (this is a minor thing considering that your typical password will be << 100 characters.

private const int kMinimumLength = 8;
private static string _specialChars = "@#_";
private static bool IsSpecialChar(char c) { return _specialChars.IndexOf(c) >= 0; }
private static bool IsValidPasswordChar(char c) { return IsSpecialChar(c) || Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c); }

public static bool IsPasswordValid(string password)
{
    if (password == null || password.Length < kMinimumLength || IsSpecial(password[0])
        || IsSpecial(password[password.Length - 1]))
             return false;
    bool hasLetter = false, hasDigit = false;
    int specials = 0;
    foreach (char c in password)
    {
       hasDigit = hasDigit || Char.IsDigit(c);
       hasLetter = hasLetter || Char.IsLetter(c);
       specials += IsSpecialChar(c) ? 1 : 0;
       if (!IsValidPasswordChar(c)) return false;
    }
    return hasDigit && hasLetter && specials > 1;
}

Now if you think about this process and understand that in such a small problem domain, you might be better off for readability to do something like this:

public class Rule {
    public Func<string, bool> Predicate { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

private List<Rule> rules = new List<Rule>() {
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => s != null),
      Description = "Password must not be null" },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => s.Length >= kMinimumLength ),
      Description = "Password must have at least " + kMinimumLength + " characters." },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => s.Count(c => IsSpecialChar(c)) >= 1),
      Description = "Password must contain at least one of " + _specialChars },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => !IsSpecialChar(s[0]) && !IsSpecialChar(s[s.Length - 1])),
      Description = "Password must not start or end with " + _specialChars },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => s.Count(c => Char.IsLetter(c)) > 0),
      Description = "Password must contain at least one letter." },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s => s.Count(c => Char.IsDigit(c)) > 0),
      Description = "Password must contain at least one digit." },
    new Rule(){ Predicate = (s =>s.Count(c => !IsValidPasswordChar(c)) == 0),
      Description = "Password must contain letters, digits, or one of " + _specialChars }
}

public bool IsPasswordValid(string s, ref string failureReason)
{
    foreach (Rule r in rules) {
        if (!r.Predicate(s)) {
          failureReason = r.Description;
          return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

And before you start thinking that I've gone all entertrpisey on you, you can look at this code immediately and each rule is self-documenting. It's easy to modify. It's easy to maintain. All the rules are isolated from each other, and if you choose to use static methods for the predicates instead of lambdas, you can easily unit test each rule on its own.

Running this code:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string reason = null;
        if (!IsPasswordValid(null, ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("aaaaaaaa", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("_aaaaaaa", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("aaaaaaa_", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("1aaa!aaa", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("11111111", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("a1a1a1a1", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);
        if (!IsPasswordValid("a1a1@1a1", ref reason)) Console.WriteLine(reason);

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.Append('a');
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) { sb.Append('@'); }
        sb.Append('a');
        sb.Append('1');
        string pass = sb.ToString();
        long ticks = Environment.TickCount;
        if (IsPasswordValid(pass, ref reason)) Console.WriteLine("Valid.");
        long endticks = Environment.TickCount;
        Console.WriteLine("Time elapsed: " + (endticks - ticks));
    }

gives:

Password must not be null
Password must have at least 8 characters.
Password must contain at least one of @#_
Password must not start or end with @#_
Password must not start or end with @#_
Password must contain at least one of @#_
Password must contain at least one of @#_
Password must contain at least one of @#_
Valid.
Time elapsed: 62

So if you're worried about performance, this can check a 1Mb password in 62 milliseconds (on my machine, which is pretty beefy).

tl;dr - "Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems." - Jamie Zawinksi

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^(?=.*[A-Za-z])(?=.*[0-9])(?=.*[@#_])[a-zA-Z][\w@#]{6,}[a-zA-Z0-9]$
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Thanks. Can you explain this part : "[a-zA-Z][\w@#]{6,}[a-zA-Z0-9]$" –  Ajay Feb 13 at 17:14
    
[a-zA-Z] = starts with alphabet. [\w@#]{6,} = a-zA-Z0-9_@# 6 or more times. a-zA-Z0-9 = alphanumeric at the end. –  Sabuj Hassan Feb 13 at 17:18
    
\w means a-zA-Z0-9_ –  Sabuj Hassan Feb 13 at 17:18
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