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I have a csh script which is trying to identify entries in a logfile between two dates

(in the script they are $start_date and $end_date entered as DD/MM/YYYY but I have simplified here)

more text_B_14_FEB_03.dt | grep TMYO 

TMYO140043J:=TMYO140043J     P33BJm SOLO            03/02/2014 
TMYO140044J:=TMYO140044J     P4m    FINL            03/02/2014 
TMYO140044M:=TMYO140044M     P3BJ   FINL            03/02/2014 
TMYO140045M:=TMYO140045M     P33BJq MARS            04/02/2014 
TMYO140046M:=TMYO140046M     P33BJq RENN            04/02/2014 
TMYO140047M:=TMYO140047M     P33BJl AKHT            05/02/2014 
TMYO140048M:=TMYO140048M     P3l    MACL            05/02/2014 
TMYO140049M:=TMYO140049M     P3q    HAYE            06/02/2014 
TMYO140050M:=TMYO140050M     P3q    ROCH            06/02/2014 
TMYO140051M:=TMYO140051M     P3q    FORR            06/02/2014 
TMYO140052L:=TMYO140052L     P3v    ROSE            07/02/2014 
TMYO140053L:=TMYO140053L     P3v    CAIR            07/02/2014 
TMYO140054L:=TMYO140054L     P3v    MURR            07/02/2014 

I have tried the following but it can't handle dates properly from previous year?

more text_B_14_FEB_03.dt | grep TMYO | awk '$5>="02/01/2013" && $5<="13/02/2014"'

TMYO140043J:=TMYO140043J     P33BJm SOLO            03/02/2014 
TMYO140044J:=TMYO140044J     P4m    FINL            03/02/2014 
TMYO140044M:=TMYO140044M     P3BJ   FINL            03/02/2014 
TMYO140045M:=TMYO140045M     P33BJq MARS            04/02/2014 
TMYO140046M:=TMYO140046M     P33BJq RENN            04/02/2014 
TMYO140047M:=TMYO140047M     P33BJl AKHT            05/02/2014 
TMYO140048M:=TMYO140048M     P3l    MACL            05/02/2014 
TMYO140049M:=TMYO140049M     P3q    HAYE            06/02/2014 
TMYO140050M:=TMYO140050M     P3q    ROCH            06/02/2014 
TMYO140051M:=TMYO140051M     P3q    FORR            06/02/2014 
TMYO140052L:=TMYO140052L     P3v    ROSE            07/02/2014 
TMYO140053L:=TMYO140053L     P3v    CAIR            07/02/2014 
TMYO140054L:=TMYO140054L     P3v    MURR            07/02/2014   

here it wrongly misses date entries from 03/02/2014 when i change start date to 04/01/2013??

more text_B_14_FEB_03.dt | grep TMYO | awk '$5>="04/01/2013" && $5<="13/02/2014"'

TMYO140045M:=TMYO140045M     P33BJq MARS            04/02/2014 
TMYO140046M:=TMYO140046M     P33BJq RENN            04/02/2014 
TMYO140047M:=TMYO140047M     P33BJl AKHT            05/02/2014 
TMYO140048M:=TMYO140048M     P3l    MACL            05/02/2014 
TMYO140049M:=TMYO140049M     P3q    HAYE            06/02/2014 
TMYO140050M:=TMYO140050M     P3q    ROCH            06/02/2014 
TMYO140051M:=TMYO140051M     P3q    FORR            06/02/2014 
TMYO140052L:=TMYO140052L     P3v    ROSE            07/02/2014 
TMYO140053L:=TMYO140053L     P3v    CAIR            07/02/2014 
TMYO140054L:=TMYO140054L     P3v    MURR            07/02/2014 

Any idea where is the awk part is going wrong? I appreciate perl is probably the most flexible answer to this, but my perk scripting is not there yet, and I would like to solve this using awk first.

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1  
more is completely useless here, and the grep can also easily be factored out; awk '/TMYO/ && ...' file –  tripleee Feb 13 '14 at 17:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should transform date to a format YYYYMMDD so it can be lexicographilly ordered. You can do it with gawk and regex, or by doing substrings operations with awk. Here is the gawk way

more text_B_14_FEB_03.dt | grep TMYO | gawk 'match($5, "([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)", ary) {B
=ary[3] ary[2] ary[1]; if (B < 20140213 && B> 20130104) print }'
share|improve this answer
    
This works well as shown - i then tried feeding my converted variable into it but it does not like that... more text_B_14_FEB_03.dt| grep TMYO | gawk 'match($5, "([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)", ary) {B=ary[3] ary[2] ary[1]; if (B < "$end_date_mod" && B> "$start_date_mod") print $1}' –  scottyjock Feb 13 '14 at 18:05
    
@scottyjock I think single quotes are preventing bash to substitue your variables. You should then double quote awk statement and escape existing quotes, as in a=s awk "BEGIN{print \"$a\"}"</dev/null, or simply double quote statement and single quoge regex –  Raul Andres Feb 13 '14 at 18:29

You need to parse dates to seconds and compare them. You have to use mktime() function, that accepts a string with each part of a date, so you will have to split() it first. This program is weird because it has much repeated code, but it seems to work, and I hope you get the idea:

awk '
    BEGIN { 
        date1 = "04/02/2014"
        split(date1, arr, "/")
        seconds1 = mktime(arr[3] " " arr[2] " " arr[1] " 0 0 0") 

        date2 = "06/02/2014"
        split(date2, arr, "/")
        seconds2 = mktime(arr[3] " " arr[2] " " arr[1] " 0 0 0")
    }

    {
        split($NF, arr, "/")
        s = mktime(arr[3] " " arr[2] " " arr[1] " 0 0 0")

        if (s >= seconds1 && s <= seconds2) {
            print $0
        }
    }
' infile

With your second example data, it yields:

TMYO140045M:=TMYO140045M     P33BJq MARS            04/02/2014 
TMYO140046M:=TMYO140046M     P33BJq RENN            04/02/2014 
TMYO140047M:=TMYO140047M     P33BJl AKHT            05/02/2014 
TMYO140048M:=TMYO140048M     P3l    MACL            05/02/2014 
TMYO140049M:=TMYO140049M     P3q    HAYE            06/02/2014 
TMYO140050M:=TMYO140050M     P3q    ROCH            06/02/2014 
TMYO140051M:=TMYO140051M     P3q    FORR            06/02/2014 
share|improve this answer

Following two links might be helpful for you to write your own code may be in future, if you are familiar with awk then you can modify and implement it.

http://www.unix.com/302884083-post2.html

http://www.unix.com/302884396-post6.html

share|improve this answer
    
The links may be pretty useful, but just a link is not enough for a Stack Overflow answer. Hence, I suggest you to write an answer based on the links or just move the text to the "comments" section. –  fedorqui Feb 13 '14 at 22:41

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