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I'm trying to detect if the current document is fullscreen or not using:

document.addEventListener('webkitfullscreenchange mozfullscreenchange fullscreenchange', function(e) {
    if ((document.fullScreenElement && document.fullScreenElement !== null) || 
    (!document.mozFullScreenElement && !document.webkitFullScreenElement)) {
        console.log('fullscreen');
    } else {
        console.log('not fullscreen');
    }
}, false);

But the event NEVER gets fired no matter I do to enter or exit fullscreen.

Any ideas?

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1  
@Huangism: I disagree. I think this is about a specific problem, not the fullscreen functionality in general. –  Patrick Hofman Feb 13 at 21:05
    
NOT a duplicate as ALL of the answers talk about detecting rather than the actual EVENT listener (which is the question). –  Cameron Feb 13 at 21:05
    
In that case it's a dupe of the docs / any docs regarding addEventListener()? –  PeeHaa Feb 13 at 21:06
    
Can't you then bind resize and in the resize function apply the detect full screen mode? Unless going into fullscreen does not trigger resize, although it would make sense that it does trigger it since there is a size difference –  Huangism Feb 13 at 21:08
    

2 Answers 2

Are you sure you didn't mean to use the jQuery bind?

The document.addEventListener does not support multiple events as far as I know.

Use this example (based on this question on SO) if you like to use jQuery:

$(document).on('webkitfullscreenchange mozfullscreenchange fullscreenchange', function(e)
{
    //do something;
});
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Oh. How would I do it then? Just copy the addEventListener for each event? –  Cameron Feb 13 at 21:06
    
@Cameron: updated the answer –  Patrick Hofman Feb 13 at 21:13
    
@Cameron: Did you get it working? –  Patrick Hofman Feb 13 at 22:50
    
Yeah, thanks. I was avoiding jQuery deliberately in my question, but usually use it exclusively in my projects. I've opted to use multiple event listeners for the sake of the question (rather than a complex for loop) but in a production environment I'd use jQuery. –  Cameron Feb 13 at 23:31
    
You are welcome. Hope it was helpful to you. –  Patrick Hofman Feb 13 at 23:39

This is what I have gone with at the moment:

function check() {

    if (!window.screenTop && !window.screenY) {
       console.log('not fullscreen');
    } else {
         console.log('fullscreen');
    }
}

document.addEventListener('webkitfullscreenchange', function(e) {

    check();

}, false);

document.addEventListener('mozfullscreenchange', function(e) {

    check();

}, false);

document.addEventListener('fullscreenchange', function(e) {

    check();

}, false);

This isn't necessarily the best solution to the question, but it does work!

I'd almost ALWAYS use jQuery and bind the events all together as shown by Patrick Hofman.

E.g.

$(document).on('webkitfullscreenchange mozfullscreenchange fullscreenchange', function(e)    
{
    if (!window.screenTop && !window.screenY) {
           console.log('not fullscreen');
    } else {
           console.log('fullscreen');
    }
});

But for the sake of keeping it library-free I've not included it in my answer, as the question was double ended and trying to figure out how to detect fullscreen in native JavaScript.

Thanks for the help, and feel free to add additional solutions / suggestions for others who are trying to achieve the same.

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