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I'm currently writing API code which, several layers deep, wraps $.ajax() calls.

One requirement is that the user must be able to cancel any request (if it's taking too long, for example).

Normally this is accomplished via something simple, like:

var jqXHR = $.ajax(..);
$(mycancelitem).click(function () {
     jqXHR.abort();
});

However my code looks more like this:

function myapicall() {

    var jqxhr = $.ajax(…);
    var prms = def.then(function (result) {
        // modify the result here
        return result + 5;
    });

    return prms;
}

The problem here is someone calling myapicall() only gets a jQuery.Promise with no way to abort it. And while the sample above is very simple, in my actual code there are several layers of chaining, in many places.

Is there a solution to this?

share|improve this question
    
myapicall() returns the jqXHR object. Why wouldn't var api = myapicall(); api.abort(); work? Also, I don't think your return result + 5; does anything. – Rocket Hazmat Feb 13 '14 at 22:03
1  
the line def = def.then(...) means it's a chained promise. if you try it in code, you'll see what you get back is not a jqXHR, but rather a real jQuery.Promise, without abort. it doesn't return the jqXHR from the ajax request, but the chained promise. – automaton Feb 13 '14 at 22:06
    
Ah! I didn't notice that. What if you removed the def= before def.then()? Would that work? – Rocket Hazmat Feb 13 '14 at 22:09
1  
A solution would be to use a proper Promise library that does support cancellation and can assimilate jQuery deferreds. Unfortunately, I can't name one yet; but maybe you have more luck at searching. – Bergi Feb 13 '14 at 23:32
1  
Hi @automaton, any news with this question? I stumbled at same problem – Strajk Nov 25 '14 at 9:37

you could return a object that has both the jqXHR and promise

function myapicall() {

    var jqXHR = $.ajax(..);
    var promise = jqXHR.then(function (result) {
        // modify the result here
        return result + 5;
    });

    return {jqXHR:jqXHR,promise:promise};
}
share|improve this answer
2  
ideally yes, this is what I would do. however, as I mentioned in my original question, unfortunately the calls span several layers, different files, etc. so I would have to update every call chain to start returning this object instead of just a promise, which isn't really feasible – automaton Feb 18 '14 at 16:29

Basically, you have you make your own promise which will represent the entire operation and add a special abort function to it. Something like the following:

function myapicall() {
    var currentAjax = $.ajax({ ... })
        .then(function(data) {
            ...
            return currentAjax = $.ajax({ ... });
        },
        function(reason) { wrapper.reject(reason); })
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(...)
        .then(function(data) {
            ...
            wrapper.resolve(data);
        },
        function(reason) { wrapper.reject(reason); });

    // haven't used jQuery promises, not sure if this is right
    var wrapper = new $.Deferred();
    wrapper.promise.abort = function() {
        currentAjax.abort();
        wrapper.reject('aborted');
    };
    return wrapper.promise;
}

This pattern (updating the currentAjax variable) must be continued at each stage of the $.ajax chain. In the last AJAX call, where everything has finally been loaded, you will resolve the wrapper promise with whatever data you wish.

share|improve this answer

My solution inspired from all the

With jQuery promises

client.js

var self = this;
function search() {
  if (self.xhr && self.xhr.state() === 'pending') self.xhr.abort();
  var self.xhr = api.flights(params); // Store xhr request for possibility to abort it in next search() call
  self.xhr.then(function(res) {
    // Show results
  });
}
// repeatedly call search()

api.js

var deferred = new $.Deferred();
var xhr = $.ajax({ });
xhr.then(function (res) { // Important, do not assign and call .then on same line
  var processed = processResponse(res);
  deferred.resolve(processed);
});
var promise = deferred.promise();
promise.abort = function() {
  xhr.abort();
  deferred.reject();
};
return promise;

With Q + jQuery promises

client.js

var self = this;
function search() {
  if (self.xhr && self.xhr.isPending()) self.xhr.abort();
  var self.xhr = api.flights(params); // Store xhr request for possibility to abort it in next search() call
  self.xhr.then(function(res) {
    // Show results
  });
}
// repeatedly call search()

api.js

var deferred = Q.defer();
var xhr = $.ajax({ });
xhr.then(function (res) { // Important, do not assign and call .then on same line
  var processed = processResponse(res);
  deferred.resolve(processed);
});
deferred.promise.abort = function() {
  xhr.abort();
  deferred.reject();
};
return deferred.promise;
share|improve this answer

Looked for solution to similar problem and solved it like this:

var xhr = $.ajax({ });
return xhr.then(function (res) { 
  var processed = processResponse(res);
  return $.Deferred().resolve(processed).promise();
}).promise(xhr);            // this is it. Extends xhr with new promise 

This will return standard jqXHR object with abort and such + all promise functions.

Note that you may or may not want to return .promise(xhr) from .then() as well. Depends on how you want to treat response in .done() functions from API.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach, but very confusing. I would not rely on this to continue working in the future. – Bergi Sep 28 '15 at 12:49
    
This is actually a really neat solution, with jQuery as it stands. The code can be simplified by removing the Deferred from the .then() callback and returning processResponse(res), which is then free to be either synch or async - ie to return either a promise or a value. – Roamer-1888 Sep 29 '15 at 2:42
    
It will be interesting to see if jQuery manages to retain its .promise(obj) capability when they go to v3. – Roamer-1888 Sep 29 '15 at 2:47

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