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I am using Test.QuickCheck to generate random Sudoku puzzles.

data Sudoku = Sudoku { getSudoku :: [[Maybe Int]] } deriving (Show, Eq)

rows :: Sudoku -> [[Maybe Int]]
rows (Sudoku rs) = rs

--B1
printSudoku :: Sudoku -> IO ()
printSudoku s = do
    putStrLn . unlines . map (map (maybe '.' (head . show))) $ rows s

--C1
cell :: Gen (Maybe Int)
cell = suchThatMaybe (frequency [(90, choose (0,0)),(10, choose(1,9))]) (/=0)

--C2
instance Arbitrary Sudoku where
    arbitrary = do
        rows <- sequence [ sequence [ cell | j <- [1..9] ] | i <- [1..9] ]
        return (Sudoku rows)

--C3
prop_Sudoku :: Sudoku -> Bool
prop_Sudoku = isSudoku

checkRandomSudoku :: IO [Bool]
checkRandomSudoku = do
    s <- sample' (arbitrary :: Gen Sudoku)
    return $ map isSudoku s

The code runs fine. However, when I perform

a <- sample' (arbitrary :: Gen Sudoku)

sequence $ map printSudoku a

it returns something like this :

....5..3.
...4.....
...2.....
...5.....
.........
...33....
...5.....
...2.4...
.........

.........
.343.....
.........
......9.2
.........
45....5.1
.2......7
.7..88.34
.9....6..

....2..8.
.2121638.
.7.7...9.
4..45.6..
.....6.2.
..6.6....
53..9.6..
..9....7.
.47892...

.373411..
5...3282.
...45..9.
8989..18.
31.8113..
9..35.6..
4.685....
.4....39.
7..6.5.76

48.178.53
1.871.4.4
3165.17..
.1...7.59
.98126.51
6.6...775
9.4636952
.5..239..
372.....8

.34.73129
.5.8.27.1
344.34931
28.6.94.1
6327.3..8
3743.5496
93...7984
..82.8...
..3.54.93

273847853
5568.7465
832.73515
3766..6.7
.7.196256
1.96.9.3.
.7156.268
1615.196.
.392..633

731652284
863.8.768
31..5.5.6
961.5.467
1245.1159
5..275471
52.727759
6.656.849
99.72352.

which obviously is not random at all. The distribution of empty cells is very high initially and then slowly decreases. Am I using the wrong function or in the wrong way? Thanks

share|improve this question
    
As a comment on your approach (rather than your description of the current problem): I suspect this isn't a great idea. Generating correct sudoku puzzles seems like one of those things that sound easy but isn't, and I bet you're going to run into a dozen weird problems once you solve this one. But there's lots of puzzles already out there in the wild -- can you skip all the problems by just using an existing corpus? –  Daniel Wagner Feb 14 at 0:59
    
I'm just following the exercise found here. I kinda agree with you. In my example, you could see that it is not even checking if there are repeated numbers in a row/column/box, but I would still like to understand why the it didn't generate the random numbers as I would expect it to. Especially frequency, I would have expected more unfilled entries since I have it much more weight than numbered entries –  dtan Feb 14 at 1:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason you are seeing this behaviour is that QuickCheck tries progressively bigger test cases. This is described in the resizing section of the manual.

In the case of suchThatMaybe increasing the size makes it retry generating an arbitrary to match the predicate you passed to it. You can see that in the source http://hackage.haskell.org/package/QuickCheck-2.6/docs/src/Test-QuickCheck-Gen.html#suchThatMaybe. The interesting code is:

try _ 0 = return Nothing
try k n = do x <- resize (2*k+n) gen
             if p x then return (Just x) else try (k+1) (n-1)

What's happening is that suchThatMaybe retries n times where n depends on the size parameter passed to the generator.

sample' tries the sizes [0,2..20] which get propagated all the way to suchThatMaybe.

You can override the increasing sizes by calling resize on a generator:

>>> a <- sample' $ (resize 2 arbitrary :: Gen Sudoku)
>>> sequence $ map printSudoku a
.....8.5.
.......4.
.........
4..25...5
......9..
....5....
........7
.....7...
...4.....

...5.....
.......4.
...6...6.
..14.....
...7...7.
....2....
.....6...
...4..572
.4.....6.

..6..8...
..4......
.........
......9..
839......
67..4....
.5.......
....5....
........3

4...1....
7..9.39..
....6....
...4.1...
.........
.........
..9....6.
.2.9...84
.....8...

.64......
..3.44...
4.......4
....1..8.
.9.......
34.......
.....6...
18.2..593
.4.7.....

.........
...8..6..
.2......5
...5.....
.2.......
........6
.3....13.
8.1.2..85
....5....

..7......
..67...5.
..6......
27....1.9
.9.......
78.....7.
......34.
.......2.
..81...81

3.1......
.........
.....6...
.........
.16.71...
.........
.2.......
.........
.....9.1.

..65..6.9
........5
..1.4....
....86...
.2..2..2.
.....9...
..6......
.........
...7..855

.......94
...14..8.
.....4...
...3....9
.........
.....5...
.5.......
45.....8.
..48.....

4........
......3..
5......4.
.4..6..2.
..3......
.........
..9......
6..9.....
....7....
share|improve this answer
    
I see. I think it's rather unintuitive because the description for the function on hackage doesn't suggest it affects probability on its predicate. I'm curious to understand what suchThatMaybe could be used for without using resize though? If you would be so kind could you spare me an example? Thanks –  dtan Feb 18 at 0:59
    
The idea of suchThatMaybe is to cover as many different test cases as possible. So if you have a predicate that is very rarely satisfied it would be more likely to hit a positive test case by retrying. –  Daniel Velkov Feb 18 at 2:02

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