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How do I expand the hexadecimal number 0x1234 to 0x11223344 in a high-performance way?

unsigned int c = 0x1234, b;
b = (c & 0xff) << 4 | c & 0xf | (c & 0xff0) << 8
        | (c & 0xff00) << 12 | (c & 0xf000) << 16;
printf("%p -> %p\n", c, b);

Output:

0x1234 -> 0x11223344

I need this for color conversion. Users provide their data in the form 0xARGB, and I need to convert it to 0xAARRGGBB. And yes, there could be millions, because each could be a pixel. 1000x1000 pixels equals to one million.

The actual case is even more complicated, because a single 32-bit value contains both foreground and background colors. So 0xARGBargb become: [ 0xAARRGGBB, 0xaarrggbb ]

Oh yes, one more thing, in a real application I also negate alpha, because in OpenGL 0xFF is non-transparent and 0x00 is most transparent, which is inconvenient in most cases, because usually you just need an RGB part and transparency is assumed to be non-present.

share|improve this question
55  
I disagree that this belongs on code review unless the scope of SO is radically changing. Questions about the most efficient way to perform operations like this have always been on-topic in the past. –  R.. Feb 14 at 4:28
3  
@exebook 'What if I remove my code' No, I don't think this would be a good idea! Better try to point out your particular doubts you have with your code actually! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 14 at 4:32
2  
You shouldn't be using %p to print unsigned int values - use %#x to get hexadecimal output with leading 0x from an unsigned int. –  caf Feb 14 at 5:06
2  
It's worth mentioning that unless you need this to run millions of times every second on some kind of real time software, the performance cost of your implementation will be close to nothing. Saving one or two &'s at a cost of readability is ridiculous when our code runs on processors that can do video effects in real time. –  Linuxios Feb 14 at 5:33
11  
Another approach would be to use a lookup table (if you can spare 256kB)... –  Dmitri Feb 14 at 6:34

13 Answers 13

up vote 49 down vote accepted

This can be done using SSE2 as follows:

void ExpandSSE2(unsigned __int64 in, unsigned __int64 &outLo, unsigned __int64 &outHi) {
  __m128i const mask = _mm_set1_epi16((short)0xF00F);
  __m128i const mul0 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x0011);
  __m128i const mul1 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x1000);
  __m128i       v;

  v = _mm_cvtsi64_si128(in);    // move the 64-bit value to a 128-bit register
  v = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(v, v);  // 0x12   -> 0x1212
  v = _mm_and_si128(v, mask);   // 0x1212 -> 0x1002
  v = _mm_mullo_epi16(v, mul0); // 0x1002 -> 0x1022
  v = _mm_mulhi_epu16(v, mul1); // 0x1022 -> 0x0102
  v = _mm_mullo_epi16(v, mul0); // 0x0102 -> 0x1122

  outLo = _mm_extract_epi64(v, 0);
  outHi = _mm_extract_epi64(v, 1);
}

Of course you’d want to put the guts of the function in an inner loop and pull out the constants. You will also want to skip the x64 registers and load values directly into 128-bit SSE registers. For an example of how to do this refer to the SSE2 implementation in the performance test below.

At its core, there are 5 instructions, which perform the operation on 4 color values at a time. So, that is only about 1.25 instructions per color value. It should also be noted that SSE2 is available anywhere x64 is available.

Performance tests for an assortment of the solutions here
A few people have mentioned that the only way to know what's faster is to run the code, this is unarguably true. So I've compiled a few of the solutions into a performance test so we can compare apples to apples. I chose solutions which I felt were significantly different from the others enough to require testing. All the solutions read from memory, operate on the data, and write back to memory. In practice some of the SSE solutions will require additional care around the alignment and handling cases when there aren't another full 16 bytes to process in the input data. The code I tested is x64 compiled under release using VS2013 running on a 4+GHz i7.

Here are my results:

ExpandOrig:               56.234 seconds  // from askers original question
ExpandSmallLUT:           30.209 seconds  // from Dmitry's answer
ExpandLookupSmallOneLUT:  33.689 seconds  // from Dmitry's answer
ExpandLookupLarge:        51.312 seconds  // a straightforward lookup table
ExpandAShelly:            43.829 seconds  // from AShelly's answer
ExpandAShellyMulOp:       43.580 seconds  // AShelly's answer with an optimization
ExpandSSE4:               17.854 seconds  // my original SSE4 answer
ExpandSSE4Unroll:         17.405 seconds  // my original SSE4 answer with loop unrolling
ExpandSSE2:               17.281 seconds  // my current SSE2 answer
ExpandSSE2Unroll:         17.152 seconds  // my current SSE2 answer with loop unrolling

In the test results above you'll see I included the askers code, three lookup table implementations including the small lookup table implementation proposed in Dmitry's answer. AShelly's solution is included too, as well as a version with an optimization I made (an operation can be eliminated). I included my original SSE4 implementation, as well as a superior SSE2 version I made later (now reflected as the answer), as well as unrolled versions of both since they were the fastest here and I wanted to see how much unrolling sped them up. I also included an SSE4 implementation of AShelly's answer.

So far I have to declare myself the winner. But the source is below, so anyone can test it out on their platform, and include their own solution into the testing to see if they've made a solution that's even faster.

#define DATA_SIZE_IN  ((unsigned)(1024 * 1024 * 128))
#define DATA_SIZE_OUT ((unsigned)(2 * DATA_SIZE_IN))
#define RERUN_COUNT   500
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <emmintrin.h> // SSE2
#include <tmmintrin.h> // SSSE3
#include <smmintrin.h> // SSE4

void ExpandOrig(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v;
  do {
    // read in data
    u  = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v  = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    u  =   (u & 0x00FF) << 4
         | (u & 0x000F)
         | (u & 0x0FF0) << 8
         | (u & 0xFF00) << 12
         | (u & 0xF000) << 16;
    v  =   (v & 0x00FF) << 4
         | (v & 0x000F)
         | (v & 0x0FF0) << 8
         | (v & 0xFF00) << 12
         | (v & 0xF000) << 16;

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out)      = u;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4)  = v;
    in                    += 4;
    out                   += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

unsigned LutLo[256],
         LutHi[256];
void MakeLutLo(void) {
  for (unsigned i = 0, x; i < 256; ++i) {
    x        = i;
    x        = ((x & 0xF0) << 4) | (x & 0x0F);
    x       |= (x << 4);
    LutLo[i] = x;
  }
}
void MakeLutHi(void) {
  for (unsigned i = 0, x; i < 256; ++i) {
    x        = i;
    x        = ((x & 0xF0) << 20) | ((x & 0x0F) << 16);
    x       |= (x << 4);
    LutHi[i] = x;
  }
}

void ExpandLookupSmall(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v;
  do {
    // read in data
    u  = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v  = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    u = LutHi[u >> 8] | LutLo[u & 0xFF];
    v = LutHi[v >> 8] | LutLo[v & 0xFF];

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out)      = u;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4)  = v;
    in                    += 4;
    out                   += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandLookupSmallOneLUT(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v;
  do {
    // read in data
    u = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    u = ((LutLo[u >> 8] << 16) | LutLo[u & 0xFF]);
    v = ((LutLo[v >> 8] << 16) | LutLo[v & 0xFF]);

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out) = u;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4) = v;
    in  += 4;
    out += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

unsigned LutLarge[256 * 256];
void MakeLutLarge(void) {
  for (unsigned i = 0; i < (256 * 256); ++i)
    LutLarge[i] = LutHi[i >> 8] | LutLo[i & 0xFF];
}

void ExpandLookupLarge(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v;
  do {
    // read in data
    u  = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v  = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    u = LutLarge[u];
    v = LutLarge[v];

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out)      = u;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4)  = v;
    in                    += 4;
    out                   += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandAShelly(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v, w, x;
  do {
    // read in data
    u  = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v  = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    w  = (((u & 0xF0F) * 0x101) & 0xF000F) + (((u & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00);
    x  = (((v & 0xF0F) * 0x101) & 0xF000F) + (((v & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00);
    w += w * 0x10;
    x += x * 0x10;

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out)      = w;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4)  = x;
    in                    += 4;
    out                   += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandAShellyMulOp(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  unsigned u, v;
  do {
    // read in data
    u = *(unsigned const*)in;
    v = u >> 16;
    u &= 0x0000FFFF;

    // do computation
    u = ((((u & 0xF0F) * 0x101) & 0xF000F) + (((u & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00)) * 0x11;
    v = ((((v & 0xF0F) * 0x101) & 0xF000F) + (((v & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00)) * 0x11;

    // store data
    *(unsigned*)(out) = u;
    *(unsigned*)(out + 4) = v;
    in += 4;
    out += 8;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandSSE4(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  __m128i const mask0 = _mm_set1_epi16((short)0x8000),
                mask1 = _mm_set1_epi8(0x0F),
                mul = _mm_set1_epi16(0x0011);
  __m128i       u, v, w, x;
  do {
    // read input into low 8 bytes of u and v
    u = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)in);

    v = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u, u);      // expand each single byte to two bytes
    u = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u, u);      // do it again for v
    w = _mm_srli_epi16(u, 4);         // copy the value into w and shift it right half a byte
    x = _mm_srli_epi16(v, 4);         // do it again for v
    u = _mm_blendv_epi8(u, w, mask0); // select odd bytes from w, and even bytes from v, giving the the desired value in the upper nibble of each byte
    v = _mm_blendv_epi8(v, x, mask0); // do it again for v
    u = _mm_and_si128(u, mask1);      // clear the all the upper nibbles
    v = _mm_and_si128(v, mask1);      // do it again for v
    u = _mm_mullo_epi16(u, mul);      // multiply each 16-bit value by 0x0011 to duplicate the lower nibble in the upper nibble of each byte
    v = _mm_mullo_epi16(v, mul);      // do it again for v

    // write output
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out     ), u);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 16), v);
    in  += 16;
    out += 32;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandSSE4Unroll(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  __m128i const mask0  = _mm_set1_epi16((short)0x8000),
                mask1  = _mm_set1_epi8(0x0F),
                mul    = _mm_set1_epi16(0x0011);
  __m128i       u0, v0, w0, x0,
                u1, v1, w1, x1,
                u2, v2, w2, x2,
                u3, v3, w3, x3;
  do {
    // read input into low 8 bytes of u and v
    u0 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in     ));
    u1 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in + 16));
    u2 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in + 32));
    u3 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in + 48));

    v0 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u0, u0);      // expand each single byte to two bytes
    u0 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u0, u0);      // do it again for v
    v1 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u1, u1);      // do it again 
    u1 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u1, u1);      // again for u1
    v2 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u2, u2);      // again for v1
    u2 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u2, u2);      // again for u2
    v3 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u3, u3);      // again for v2
    u3 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u3, u3);      // again for u3
    w0 = _mm_srli_epi16(u0, 4);          // copy the value into w and shift it right half a byte
    x0 = _mm_srli_epi16(v0, 4);          // do it again for v
    w1 = _mm_srli_epi16(u1, 4);          // again for u1
    x1 = _mm_srli_epi16(v1, 4);          // again for v1
    w2 = _mm_srli_epi16(u2, 4);          // again for u2
    x2 = _mm_srli_epi16(v2, 4);          // again for v2
    w3 = _mm_srli_epi16(u3, 4);          // again for u3
    x3 = _mm_srli_epi16(v3, 4);          // again for v3
    u0 = _mm_blendv_epi8(u0, w0, mask0); // select even bytes from w, and odd bytes from v, giving the the desired value in the upper nibble of each byte
    v0 = _mm_blendv_epi8(v0, x0, mask0); // do it again for v
    u1 = _mm_blendv_epi8(u1, w1, mask0); // again for u1
    v1 = _mm_blendv_epi8(v1, x1, mask0); // again for v1
    u2 = _mm_blendv_epi8(u2, w2, mask0); // again for u2
    v2 = _mm_blendv_epi8(v2, x2, mask0); // again for v2
    u3 = _mm_blendv_epi8(u3, w3, mask0); // again for u3
    v3 = _mm_blendv_epi8(v3, x3, mask0); // again for v3
    u0 = _mm_and_si128(u0, mask1);       // clear the all the upper nibbles
    v0 = _mm_and_si128(v0, mask1);       // do it again for v
    u1 = _mm_and_si128(u1, mask1);       // again for u1
    v1 = _mm_and_si128(v1, mask1);       // again for v1
    u2 = _mm_and_si128(u2, mask1);       // again for u2
    v2 = _mm_and_si128(v2, mask1);       // again for v2
    u3 = _mm_and_si128(u3, mask1);       // again for u3
    v3 = _mm_and_si128(v3, mask1);       // again for v3
    u0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u0, mul);       // multiply each 16-bit value by 0x0011 to duplicate the lower nibble in the upper nibble of each byte
    v0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v0, mul);       // do it again for v
    u1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u1, mul);       // again for u1
    v1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v1, mul);       // again for v1
    u2 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u2, mul);       // again for u2
    v2 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v2, mul);       // again for v2
    u3 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u3, mul);       // again for u3
    v3 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v3, mul);       // again for v3

    // write output
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out      ), u0);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  16), v0);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  32), u1);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  48), v1);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  64), u2);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  80), v2);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out +  96), u3);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 112), v3);
    in  += 64;
    out += 128;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandSSE2(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  __m128i const mask = _mm_set1_epi16((short)0xF00F),
                mul0 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x0011),
                mul1 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x1000);
  __m128i       u, v;
  do {
    // read input into low 8 bytes of u and v
    u = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)in);

    v = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u, u);      // expand each single byte to two bytes
    u = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u, u);      // do it again for v

    u = _mm_and_si128(u, mask);
    v = _mm_and_si128(v, mask);
    u = _mm_mullo_epi16(u, mul0);
    v = _mm_mullo_epi16(v, mul0);
    u = _mm_mulhi_epu16(u, mul1);     // this can also be done with a right shift of 4 bits, but this seems to mesure faster
    v = _mm_mulhi_epu16(v, mul1);
    u = _mm_mullo_epi16(u, mul0);
    v = _mm_mullo_epi16(v, mul0);

    // write output
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out     ), u);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 16), v);
    in  += 16;
    out += 32;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandSSE2Unroll(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  __m128i const mask = _mm_set1_epi16((short)0xF00F),
                mul0 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x0011),
                mul1 = _mm_set1_epi16(0x1000);
  __m128i       u0, v0,
                u1, v1;
  do {
    // read input into low 8 bytes of u and v
    u0 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in     ));
    u1 = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)(in + 16));

    v0 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u0, u0);      // expand each single byte to two bytes
    u0 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u0, u0);      // do it again for v
    v1 = _mm_unpackhi_epi8(u1, u1);      // do it again 
    u1 = _mm_unpacklo_epi8(u1, u1);      // again for u1

    u0 = _mm_and_si128(u0, mask);
    v0 = _mm_and_si128(v0, mask);
    u1 = _mm_and_si128(u1, mask);
    v1 = _mm_and_si128(v1, mask);

    u0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u0, mul0);
    v0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v0, mul0);
    u1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u1, mul0);
    v1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v1, mul0);

    u0 = _mm_mulhi_epu16(u0, mul1);
    v0 = _mm_mulhi_epu16(v0, mul1);
    u1 = _mm_mulhi_epu16(u1, mul1);
    v1 = _mm_mulhi_epu16(v1, mul1);

    u0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u0, mul0);
    v0 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v0, mul0);
    u1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(u1, mul0);
    v1 = _mm_mullo_epi16(v1, mul0);

    // write output
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out     ), u0);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 16), v0);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 32), u1);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 48), v1);

    in  += 32;
    out += 64;
  } while (in != past);
}

void ExpandAShellySSE4(unsigned char const *in, unsigned char const *past, unsigned char *out) {
  __m128i const zero      = _mm_setzero_si128(),
                v0F0F     = _mm_set1_epi32(0x0F0F),
                vF0F0     = _mm_set1_epi32(0xF0F0),
                v0101     = _mm_set1_epi32(0x0101),
                v1010     = _mm_set1_epi32(0x1010),
                v000F000F = _mm_set1_epi32(0x000F000F),
                v0F000F00 = _mm_set1_epi32(0x0F000F00),
                v0011 = _mm_set1_epi32(0x0011);
  __m128i       u, v, w, x;
  do {
    // read in data
    u = _mm_load_si128((__m128i const*)in);
    v = _mm_unpackhi_epi16(u, zero);
    u = _mm_unpacklo_epi16(u, zero);

    // original source: ((((a & 0xF0F) * 0x101) & 0xF000F) + (((a & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00)) * 0x11;
    w = _mm_and_si128(u, v0F0F);
    x = _mm_and_si128(v, v0F0F);
    u = _mm_and_si128(u, vF0F0);
    v = _mm_and_si128(v, vF0F0);
    w = _mm_mullo_epi32(w, v0101); // _mm_mullo_epi32 is what makes this require SSE4 instead of SSE2
    x = _mm_mullo_epi32(x, v0101);
    u = _mm_mullo_epi32(u, v1010);
    v = _mm_mullo_epi32(v, v1010);
    w = _mm_and_si128(w, v000F000F);
    x = _mm_and_si128(x, v000F000F);
    u = _mm_and_si128(u, v0F000F00);
    v = _mm_and_si128(v, v0F000F00);
    u = _mm_add_epi32(u, w);
    v = _mm_add_epi32(v, x);
    u = _mm_mullo_epi32(u, v0011);
    v = _mm_mullo_epi32(v, v0011);

    // write output
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out     ), u);
    _mm_store_si128((__m128i*)(out + 16), v);
    in  += 16;
    out += 32;
  } while (in != past);
}

int main() {
  unsigned char *const indat   = new unsigned char[DATA_SIZE_IN ],
                *const outdat0 = new unsigned char[DATA_SIZE_OUT],
                *const outdat1 = new unsigned char[DATA_SIZE_OUT],
                *      curout  = outdat0,
                *      lastout = outdat1,
                *      place;
  unsigned             start,
                       stop;

  place = indat + DATA_SIZE_IN - 1;
  do {
    *place = (unsigned char)rand();
  } while (place-- != indat);
  MakeLutLo();
  MakeLutHi();
  MakeLutLarge();

  for (unsigned testcount = 0; testcount < 1000; ++testcount) {
    // solution posted by asker
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandOrig(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandOrig:\t\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);

    // Dmitry's small lookup table solution
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandLookupSmall(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandSmallLUT:\t\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // Dmitry's small lookup table solution using only one lookup table
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandLookupSmallOneLUT(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandLookupSmallOneLUT:\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // large lookup table solution
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandLookupLarge(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandLookupLarge:\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // AShelly's Interleave bits by Binary Magic Numbers solution
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandAShelly(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandAShelly:\t\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // AShelly's Interleave bits by Binary Magic Numbers solution optimizing out an addition
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandAShellyMulOp(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandAShellyMulOp:\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // my SSE4 solution
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandSSE4(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandSSE4:\t\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // my SSE4 solution unrolled
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandSSE4Unroll(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandSSE4Unroll:\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // my SSE2 solution
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandSSE2(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandSSE2:\t\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // my SSE2 solution unrolled
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandSSE2Unroll(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandSSE2Unroll:\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;

    // AShelly's Interleave bits by Binary Magic Numbers solution implemented using SSE2
    start = clock();
    for (unsigned rerun = 0; rerun < RERUN_COUNT; ++rerun)
      ExpandAShellySSE4(indat, indat + DATA_SIZE_IN, curout);
    stop = clock();
    std::cout << "ExpandAShellySSE4:\t\t" << (((stop - start) / 1000) / 60) << ':' << (((stop - start) / 1000) % 60) << ":." << ((stop - start) % 1000) << std::endl;

    std::swap(curout, lastout);
    if (memcmp(outdat0, outdat1, DATA_SIZE_OUT))
      std::cout << "INCORRECT OUTPUT" << std::endl;
  }

  delete[] indat;
  delete[] outdat0;
  delete[] outdat1;
  return 0;
}

NOTE:
I had an SSE4 implementation here initially. I found a way to implement this using SSE2, which is better because it will run on more platforms. The SSE2 implementation is also faster. So, the solution presented at the top is now the SSE2 implementation and not the SSE4 one. The SSE4 implementation can still be seen in the performance tests or in the edit history.

share|improve this answer
2  
Nice Job. Thanks for doing the tests. If I've learned one thing from them its this: I don't want to write SSE code unless I absolutely have to have that last iota of performance :) It is sure not easy to read. –  AShelly Feb 15 at 15:21
2  
@AShelly: Nobody does, especially if portability is a concern. There are a wide range of SIMD instruction sets... SSE is only valid in the x86 world. You have to deal with AltiVec (VMX) on PPC and NEON on ARM to name a few. Interfacing directly with instruction set extensions is ugly on any architecture though ;) –  Andon M. Coleman Feb 15 at 16:25
    
@AShelly Thank you. The SSE isn't so bad once you start to memorize what some of the operations are and their naming conventions. I only really started using it a few months back. It also helps when working with the ordering of vector elements becomes more second nature. The small LUT was a pretty fast solution too. There is a vectorized lookup, _mm_i32gather_epi32, which will do 4 lookups in parallel (AVX is the successor to SSE). It would be interesting to see how a solution involving this performs. However it requires AVX2 instructions, and I don't yet have access to a processor that new. –  Apriori Feb 15 at 16:29
4  
Stunning job. This deserves a lot more upvotes –  sehe Feb 15 at 22:10
3  
I ran your performance test on my system (a later Core 2, 64-bit linux, gcc 4.8.1 using -O3 -march=native). While your SSE4 code was fastest, many of the bit-manipulation solutions were almost as fast (within a few percent)... apparently gcc does a reasonable job of vectorizing the code on it's own when the relevant features and optimizations are enabled. –  Dmitri Feb 15 at 23:26

I'm not sure what the most efficient way would be, but this is a little shorter:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  unsigned x = 0x1234;

  x = (x << 8) | x;
  x = ((x & 0x00f000f0) << 4) | (x & 0x000f000f);
  x = (x << 4) | x;

  printf("0x1234 -> 0x%08x\n",x);

  return 0;
}

If you need to do this repeatedly and very quickly, as suggested in your edit, you could consider generating a lookup table and using that instead. The following function dynamically allocates and initializes such a table:

unsigned *makeLookupTable(void)
{
  unsigned *tbl = malloc(sizeof(unsigned) * 65536);
  if (!tbl) return NULL;
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < 65536; i++) {
    unsigned x = i;
    x |= (x << 8);
    x = ((x & 0x00f000f0) << 4) | (x & 0x000f000f);
    x |= (x << 4);

    /* Uncomment next line to invert the high byte as mentioned in the edit. */
    /* x = x ^ 0xff000000; */

    tbl[i] = x;
  }
  return tbl;
}

After that each conversion is just something like:

result = lookuptable[input];

..or maybe:

result = lookuptable[input & 0xffff];

Or a smaller, more cache-friendly lookup table (or pair) could be used with one lookup each for the high and low bytes (as noted by @LưuVĩnhPhúc in the comments). In that case, table generation code might be:

unsigned *makeLookupTableLow(void)
{
  unsigned *tbl = malloc(sizeof(unsigned) * 256);
  if (!tbl) return NULL;
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
    unsigned x = i;
    x = ((x & 0xf0) << 4) | (x & 0x0f);
    x |= (x << 4);
    tbl[i] = x;
  }
  return tbl;
}

...and an optional second table:

unsigned *makeLookupTableHigh(void)
{
  unsigned *tbl = malloc(sizeof(unsigned) * 256);
  if (!tbl) return NULL;
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
    unsigned x = i;
    x = ((x & 0xf0) << 20) | ((x & 0x0f) << 16);
    x |= (x << 4);

    /* uncomment next line to invert high byte */
    /* x = x ^ 0xff000000; */

    tbl[i] = x;
  }
  return tbl;
}

...and to convert a value with two tables:

result = hightable[input >> 8] | lowtable[input & 0xff];

...or with one (just the low table above):

result = (lowtable[input >> 8] << 16) | lowtable[input & 0xff];
result ^= 0xff000000; /* to invert high byte */

If the upper part of the value (alpha?) doesn't change much, even the single large table might perform well since consecutive lookups would be closer together in the table.


I took the performance test code @Apriori posted, made some adjustments, and added tests for the other responses that he hadn't included originally... then compiled three versions of it with different settings. One is 64-bit code with SSE4.1 enabled, where the compiler can make use of SSE for optimizations... and then two 32-bit versions, one with SSE and one without. Although all three were run on the same fairly recent processor, the results show how the optimal solution can change depending on the processor features:

                           64b SSE4.1  32b SSE4.1  32b no SSE
-------------------------- ----------  ----------  ----------
ExpandOrig           time:  3.502 s     3.501 s     6.260 s
ExpandLookupSmall    time:  3.530 s     3.997 s     3.996 s
ExpandLookupLarge    time:  3.434 s     3.419 s     3.427 s
ExpandIsalamon       time:  3.654 s     3.673 s     8.870 s
ExpandIsalamonOpt    time:  3.784 s     3.720 s     8.719 s
ExpandChronoKitsune  time:  3.658 s     3.463 s     6.546 s
ExpandEvgenyKluev    time:  6.790 s     7.697 s    13.383 s
ExpandIammilind      time:  3.485 s     3.498 s     6.436 s
ExpandDmitri         time:  3.457 s     3.477 s     5.461 s
ExpandNitish712      time:  3.574 s     3.800 s     6.789 s
ExpandAdamLiss       time:  3.673 s     5.680 s     6.969 s
ExpandAShelly        time:  3.524 s     4.295 s     5.867 s
ExpandAShellyMulOp   time:  3.527 s     4.295 s     5.852 s
ExpandSSE4           time:  3.428 s
ExpandSSE4Unroll     time:  3.333 s
ExpandSSE2           time:  3.392 s
ExpandSSE2Unroll     time:  3.318 s
ExpandAShellySSE4    time:  3.392 s

The executables were compiled on 64-bit Linux with gcc 4.8.1, using -m64 -O3 -march=core2 -msse4.1, -m32 -O3 -march=core2 -msse4.1 and -m32 -O3 -march=core2 -mno-sse respectively. @Apriori's SSE tests were omitted for the 32-bit builds (crashed on 32-bit with SSE enabled, and obviously won't work with SSE disabled).

Among the adjustments made was to use actual image data instead of random values (photos of objects with transparent backgrounds), which greatly improved the performance of the large lookup table but made little difference for the others.

Essentially, the lookup tables win by a landslide when SSE is unnavailable (or unused)... and the manually coded SSE solutions win otherwise. However, it's also noteworthy that when the compiler could use SSE for optimizations, most of the bit manipulation solutions were almost as fast as the manually coded SSE -- still slower, but only marginally.

share|improve this answer
1  
Anything involving malloc will be horribly inefficient, in comparison to what the OP already got. –  Lundin Feb 14 at 7:33
14  
@Lundin It's a one-time malloc to setup the table, it's not part of the conversions. –  Dmitri Feb 14 at 7:42
11  
@Lundin It only has to be done once at runtime though... it'll just take a fraction of a second at program start. A static const table would work too, but you'd want to write a program to generate the source code given the size of the table. –  Dmitri Feb 14 at 7:58
6  
Just 256 entry lookup table is enough. You can lookup the low and high byte seperately. Too large table may not fit in cache and performance may be worse –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Feb 14 at 8:36
1  
@Apriori The image data is loaded from a separate file before the tests run. –  Dmitri Feb 19 at 8:05

Here's another attempt, using eight operations:

b = (((c & 0x0F0F) * 0x0101) & 0x00F000F) + 
    (((c & 0xF0F0) * 0x1010) & 0xF000F00);
b += b * 0x10;

printf("%x\n",b); //Shows '0x11223344'

*Note, this post originally contained quite different code, based on Interleave bits by Binary Magic Numbers from Sean Anderson's bithacks page. But that wasn't quite what the OP was asking. so it has ben removed. The majority of the comments below refer to that missing version.

share|improve this answer
3  
That's some seriously ugly code there. No matter how efficient this turns out to be, it looks like premature optimization. I'd seriously consider using less efficient code for the sake of readability, maintenance and bug free code. –  Lundin Feb 14 at 7:31
2  
@Lundin the codes overthere are already debugged, just use and if there is any problem, it's in your code. You can always leave a comment in the code to describe what the function do and where did you take it from –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Feb 14 at 7:52
    
@LưuVĩnhPhúc Indeed any bug will be in my code. And how do you propose that I smoothly debug said code, if my program is one big goo of magic numbers? –  Lundin Feb 14 at 7:55
4  
The proposed code would duplicate single bits of 8-bit value. While OP asks for duplicating 4-bit nibbles of 16-bit value. –  Evgeny Kluev Feb 14 at 10:46
1  
You are absolutely right @EvgenyKluev. This won't work. –  AShelly Feb 14 at 11:55

I wanted to add this link into the answer pool because I think it is extremely important when talking about optimization, to remember the hardware we are running on, as well as the technologies compiling our code for said platform. This link is a blog about looking into optimizing a set of code for the CPU pipelining. I actually shows an example of where he tries to simplify the math down to the fewest actual mathematical operations, yet it was FAR from the most optimal solution in terms of time. I have seen a couple of answers here speaking to that effect, and they may be correct, they may not. The only way to know is to actually measure the time from start to finish of your particular snippit of code, in comparison to others. Read this blog, it is EXTREMELY interesting.

http://lolengine.net/blog/2011/9/17/playing-with-the-cpu-pipeline

I think I should mention that I am in this particular case going to put ANY code up here unless I have truly tried multiple attempts, and actually gotten on that is particularly faster through multiple tries.

share|improve this answer
    
Although I agree with you about the need for profiling, this answer is not really an answer. –  AShelly Feb 14 at 18:56
    
@AShelly - I think everybody else here is giving answers, and they don't KNOW. The point I am trying to potentially make is that without working it for your particular architecture, you actually wont KNOW. Indeed just because it is x86 doesn't mean it will be the same either. An AMD may be different than an intel, indeed an i7 may be different than a core 2. Simply asking what is the fastest, is a much more difficult answer than the code itself. –  trumpetlicks Feb 14 at 20:06

I think that the lookup table approach suggested by Dimitri is a good choice, but I suggest to go one step further and generate the table in compile time; doing the work at compile time will obviously lessen the execution time.

First, we create a compile-time value, using any of the suggested methods:

constexpr unsigned int transform1(unsigned int x)
{
  return ((x << 8) | x);
}

constexpr unsigned int transform2(unsigned int x)
{
  return (((x & 0x00f000f0) << 4) | (x & 0x000f000f));
}

constexpr unsigned int transform3(unsigned int x)
{
  return ((x << 4) | x);
}

constexpr unsigned int transform(unsigned int x)
{
  return transform3(transform2(transform1(x)));
}

// Dimitri version, using constexprs
template <unsigned int argb> struct aarrggbb_dimitri
{
  static const unsigned int value = transform(argb);
};

// Adam Liss version
template <unsigned int argb> struct aarrggbb_adamLiss
{
  static const unsigned int value =
    (argb & 0xf000) * 0x11000 +
    (argb & 0x0f00) * 0x01100 +
    (argb & 0x00f0) * 0x00110 +
    (argb & 0x000f) * 0x00011;
};

And then, we create the compile-time lookup table with whatever method we have available, I'll wish to use the C++14 integer sequence but I don't know which compiler will the OP be using. So another possible approach would be to use a pretty ugly macro:

#define EXPAND16(x) aarrggbb<x + 0>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 1>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 2>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 3>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 4>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 5>::value, \
aarrggbb<x + 6>::value, \
... and so on

#define EXPAND EXPAND16(0), \
EXPAND16(0x10), \
EXPAND16(0x20), \
EXPAND16(0x30), \
EXPAND16(0x40), \
... and so on

... and so on

See demo here.

PS: The Adam Liss approach could be used without C++11.

share|improve this answer

If multiplication is cheap and 64-bit arithmetics available, you could use this code:

uint64_t x = 0x1234;
x *= 0x0001000100010001ull;
x &= 0xF0000F0000F0000Full;
x *= 0x0000001001001001ull;
x &= 0xF0F0F0F000000000ull;
x = (x >> 36) * 0x11;
std::cout << std::hex << x << '\n';

In fact, it uses the same idea as original attempt by AShelly.

share|improve this answer

This works and may be easier to understand, but bit manipulations are so cheap that I wouldn't worry much about efficiency.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void main() {
  unsigned int c = 0x1234, b;

  b = (c & 0xf000) * 0x11000 + (c & 0x0f00) * 0x01100 +
      (c & 0x00f0) * 0x00110 + (c & 0x000f) * 0x00011;

  printf("%x -> %x\n", c, b);
} 
share|improve this answer
3  
I believe the multiplication operations are expensive in the most architectures. Additionally, it may have to use a math processor. –  iammilind Feb 14 at 5:18
    
That's not nearly as true as it used to be. –  AShelly Feb 14 at 12:32
7  
Try this: write a quick C program that multiplies a number by 0x11. Write another that shifts it left 4 bits and adds the result to the original. Compile them both to assembly and compare the results. "Belief" isn't nearly as important as verification, especially when it comes to modern compiler optimization. –  Adam Liss Feb 14 at 14:00
    
@AdamLiss I do want to add here that I believe heavily in verification over belief, but it is a fairly well known fact that multiplication is indeed slower than addition no matter whether it is floating point or integer. I found it here software.intel.com/en-us/forums/topic/299987, that in a core 2 it is still 3 times slower than addition or bitwise operations. I think Adam is saying that in this case, the compiler will essentially optimize the multiplications to either an add or some bitwise operator. This code then can indeed be fast and easy to read. –  trumpetlicks Feb 14 at 17:48
2  
The point is that, depending on the multiplicands, the compiler may not generate multiply instructions at all. I spent quite a while as a new programmer trying to understand the assembly code that the compiler generated for the integer multiplication n *= 10. Then I realized it was smart enough to know that n * 10 = n * (2 + 8) = (n << 1) + (n << 3) and it preferred the more-efficient shifts and adds to the simpler but more expensive multiplication. I'd be amazed if a compiler didn't implement multiplication by 3 * 2^n, which is 0x11 << n, as shifts and adds. –  Adam Liss Feb 15 at 3:02

Perhaps this could be more simpler & efficient.

unsigned int g = 0x1234;
unsigned int ans = 0;

ans = ( ( g & 0xf000 ) << 16) + ( (g & 0xf00 ) << 12)
    + ( ( g&0xf0 ) << 8) + ( ( g&0xf ) << 4);

ans  = ( ans | ans>>4 );

printf("%p -> %p\n", g, ans);
share|improve this answer
    
This won't be efficient. You are using same number of | (or +), << (or >>) as the earlier solution. –  iammilind Feb 14 at 5:24

Assuming that, you want to always convert 0xWXYZ to 0xWWXXYYZZ, I believe that below solution would be little faster than the one you suggested:

unsigned int c = 0x1234;     
unsigned int b = (c & 0xf) | ((c & 0xf0) << 4) |
                 ((c & 0xf00) << 8) | ((c & 0xf000) << 12);
b |= (b << 4);

Notice that, one &(and) operation is saved from your solution. :-)
Demo.

share|improve this answer

Another way is:

DWORD OrVal(DWORD & nible_pos, DWORD input_val, DWORD temp_val, int shift)
{
    if (nible_pos==0)
        nible_pos = 0x0000000F;
    else
        nible_pos = nible_pos << 4;
    DWORD nible = input_val & nible_pos;
    temp_val |= (nible << shift);
    temp_val |= (nible << (shift + 4));
    return temp_val;
}

DWORD Converter2(DWORD input_val)
{
    DWORD nible_pos = 0x00000000;
    DWORD temp_val = 0x00000000;
    temp_val = OrVal(nible_pos, input_val, temp_val, 0);
    temp_val = OrVal(nible_pos, input_val, temp_val, 4);
    temp_val = OrVal(nible_pos, input_val, temp_val, 8);
    temp_val = OrVal(nible_pos, input_val, temp_val, 12);
    return temp_val;
}

DWORD val2 = Converter2(0x1234);

An optimized version (3 times faster):

DWORD Converter3(DWORD input_val)
{
    DWORD nible_pos = 0;
    DWORD temp_val = 0;
    int shift = 0;
    DWORD bit_nible[4] = { 0x000F, 0x000F0, 0x0F00, 0xF000 };

    for ( ; shift < 16; shift+=4 )
    {
        if (nible_pos==0)
            nible_pos = 0x0000000F;
        else
            nible_pos = nible_pos << 4;
        DWORD nible = input_val & nible_pos;
        temp_val |= (nible << shift);
        temp_val |= (nible << (shift + 4));
    }

    return temp_val;
}

share|improve this answer
unsigned long transform(unsigned long n)
{

    /* n: 00AR
     *    00GB
     */
    n = ((n & 0xff00) << 8) | (n & 0x00ff);

    /* n: 0AR0
     *    0GB0
     */
    n <<= 4;

    /* n: AAR0
     *    GGB0
     */
    n |= (n & 0x0f000f00L) << 4;

    /* n: AARR
     *    GGBB
     */
    n |= (n & 0x00f000f0L) >> 4;

    return n;
}

The alpha and red components are shifted into the higher 2 bytes where they belong, and the result is then shifted left by 4 bits, resulting in every component being exactly where it needs to be.

With a form of 0AR0 0GB0, a bit mask and left-shift combination is OR'ed with the current value. This copies the A and G components to the position just left of them. The same thing is done for the R and B components, except in the opposite direction.

share|improve this answer

If you are going to do this for OpenGL I suggest you to use a glTexImageXD function with type parameter set to GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT_4_4_4_4. Your OpenGL driver should do the rest. And about the transparency inversion you can always manipulate blending via glBlendFunc and glBlendEquation functions.

share|improve this answer
    
This should be marked as "Accepted answer" since this is what I need, but original formulation of a question was about numbers. –  exebook Feb 20 at 3:51

While others operate on hard-core optimization...

Take this as your best bet

std::string toAARRGGBB(const std::string &argb)
{
    std::string ret("0x");

    int start = 2; //"0x####";
                   // ^^ skipped

    for (int i = start;i < argb.length(); ++i)
    {
        ret += argb[i];
        ret += argb[i];
    }
    return ret;
}

int main()
{
    std::string argb = toAARRGGBB("0xACED"); //!!!
}

haha

share|improve this answer
1  
The question is not to convert the number to a string - it is to change one number to a different number by duplicating the nibbles. I think you completely missed the point with your answer. –  Floris Feb 19 at 1:46

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