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I'm trying to take getbits from K&R C 2.9 and pass a text file containing ints through, check to make sure getbits() can handle them, and format the ouput to another txt file. I'm stumped and my instructor told me NOT to use fscanf, use stdin and maybe scanf.

Here's my code

include <stdio.h>


unsigned int getbits(unsigned int x, int p, int n) 
{
  return (x >> (p + 1 - n)) &  ~(~0 << n);
}


int main()
{
  File * ipf = fopen("input.txt", "r");
  int x = 0 , p = 0, n = 0, b = 0;

  while(fscanf(ipf, "%d, %d, %u", &p, &n, &x) != EOF)
  {

    if(x < 4294967296 && p < 32 && n < p + 2)
    { 
      b = getbits(x,p,n);
      printf("gebits( x = %u, p = %d, n =  %d) = %u\n", x, p, n, b);
    } 
    else { printf("ERROR"); }
  }

  return 0;
}

input.txt

2,1,127
2,4,127
31,3,1431655765
32,3,1431655765

output.txt

getbits(x=127, p=2, n=1) = 1
ERROR
getbits(x=1431655765, p=31, n=3) = 2
ERROR

I know this is all basic but I really apreciate any help :)

share|improve this question
    
Your loop condition is wrong, you have to think about what will happen when there is an error in the file so it has, for example, more or less values in a single line. I recommend you read e.g. this fscanf reference. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '14 at 5:38
    
Also, be careful with your comparison with 4294967296, as that literal is not an int but a long long (if your compiler have that type). Besides, x is of type int and not unsigned int (which you read and print it as). –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '14 at 5:39
    
As for how to read integers without using fscanf, you might want to read about fgets, strtok and strtol. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '14 at 5:42
    
i think your output is as expected as per your code.So what is wrong you feel and error?. you not want to use fscanf because your instructor not allow it right. –  Jayesh Feb 14 '14 at 5:52
    
If I'm on a 32bit system won't my ints be 4 bytes @JoachimPileborg? –  Lsooties Feb 14 '14 at 5:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also read an integer from the file without using fscanf. Here is some code which reads content from the file, without using fscanf. I also corrected some data type declaration for your value in which you compared int data to long long.

int main()
{
    FILE * ipf = fopen("input.txt", "r");
    long long x = 0 , p = 0, n = 0, b = 0;
    char * line = NULL;
    size_t len = 0;
    ssize_t read;
    char *token;

      while ((read = getline(&line, &len, ipf)) != -1)
      {   
            token=strtok(line,",");
            p=atoi(token);

            token=strtok(NULL,",");
            n=atoi(token);

            token=strtok(NULL,"");
            x=atoi(token);

            if(x < 4294967296 && p < 32 && n < p + 2)
            { 
              b = getbits(x,p,n);
              printf("gebits( x = %lld, p = %lld, n =  %lld) = %lld\n", x, p, n, b);
            } 
            else { printf("ERROR\n"); }
      }

  return 0;
}

For Windows, use the following solution:

int main()
{
    FILE * ipf = fopen("input.txt", "r");
    long long x = 0 , p = 0, n = 0, b = 0;
    char line [256];
    size_t len = 0;
    ssize_t read;
    char *token;

  while ((fgets(line,256, ipf)) != 0)
  {   
        token=strtok(line,",");
        p=atoi(token);

        token=strtok(NULL,",");
        n=atoi(token);

        token=strtok(NULL,"");
        x=atoi(token);

        if(x < 4294967296 && p < 32 && n < p + 2)
        { 
          b = getbits(x,p,n);
          printf("gebits( x = %lld, p = %lld, n =  %lld) = %lld\n", x, p, n, b);
        } 
        else { printf("ERROR\n"); }
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that getline is not a C standard function, and will not exist on platforms such as Windows. –  Joachim Pileborg Feb 14 '14 at 6:28
    
@JoachimPileborg yes you are right,getline() is not in the C standard library, but is a POSIX 2008 extension.So it will help OP if he not use windows else may require different solution. –  Jayesh Feb 14 '14 at 6:36

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