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I'm tasked to create a program which dynamically allocates memory for a structure. normally we would use

x=malloc(sizeof(int)*y);

However, what do I use for a structure variable? I don't think its possible to do

struct st x = malloc(sizeof(struct)); 

Could someone help me out? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
when in doubt, try it out! – Anthony Forloney Feb 1 '10 at 14:40
1  
@Blackbinary: Almost there. The correct syntax is malloc(sizeof(struct st)). Of course sizeof *x stated below is preferred. – kennytm Feb 1 '10 at 14:42
    
+1 from me...good question and useful for a beginner! – t0mm13b Feb 1 '10 at 15:09
up vote 50 down vote accepted

My favorite:

#include <stdlib.h>

struct st *x = malloc(sizeof *x); 

Note that:

  • x must be a pointer
  • no cast is required
  • include appropriate header
share|improve this answer
4  
One nice thing is that it enforces x being a pointer. – David Thornley Feb 1 '10 at 14:41
7  
Don't let kids play with sharp objects :) – Nikolai N Fetissov Feb 1 '10 at 14:42
    
Interesting - had forgotten that trick. – Martin Beckett Feb 1 '10 at 14:43
3  
The thing I like the most is the fact that even if you rename the structure later, the RHS still works. Arguably, with modern editors this is not much of a problem. – dirkgently Feb 1 '10 at 14:45
1  
Won't RHS lead you to trouble if you do a typo error and miss *? I always thought instead of doing *x mentioning the struct name is a better way as it will protect against the typo error. Am I missing something here? – Jay Feb 1 '10 at 15:04

You're not quite doing that right. struct st x is a structure, not a pointer. It's fine if you want to allocate one on the stack. For allocating on the heap, struct st * x = malloc(sizeof(struct st));.

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struct st* x = malloc( sizeof( struct st ));

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This should do:

struct st *x = malloc(sizeof *x); 
share|improve this answer

It's exactly possible to do that - and is the correct way

Assuming you meant to type

struct st *x = malloc(sizeof(struct st)); 

ps. You have to do sizeof(struct) even when you know the size of all the contents because the compiler may pad out the struct so that memebers are aligned.

struct tm {
  int x;
  char y;
}

might have a different size to

struct tm {
  char y;
  int x;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Nope: sizeof(struct) is not legal. sizeof(struct st) is. – David Thornley Feb 1 '10 at 14:41
    
you mean struct st *x = malloc(sizeof(struct st)); struct itself doesn't actually have a size. – mechko Feb 1 '10 at 14:43
    
Sorry - skimmed reading the op. I was concentrating on them asking if sizeof(any struct) was legal – Martin Beckett Feb 1 '10 at 14:46
    
Is is struct st or struct tm? :-) – Alok Singhal Feb 1 '10 at 14:48

struct st *x = (struct st *)malloc(sizeof(struct st));

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2  
Do not cast malloc(): 1. It's not needed (C void* is different than C++ void*), 2. Lint-like analysis tools could detect giving malloc() the wrong size, and 3. including the proper header will give the compiler the right hints that you mean the system malloc, which may produce better code. – geocar Feb 1 '10 at 15:00

I believe, when you call sizeof on a struct type, C recursively calls sizeof on the fields of the struct. So, struct st *x = malloc(sizeof(struct st)); only really works if struct st has a fixed size. This is only significant if you have something like a variable sized string in your struct and you DON'T want to give it the max length each time.

In general,

struct st *x = malloc(sizeof(struct st));

works. Occasionally, you will run into either variable sized structs or 'abstract' structs (think: abstract class from Java) and the compiler will tell you that it cannot determine the size of struct st. In these cases, Either you will have to calculate the size by hand and call malloc with a number, or you will find a function which returns a fully implemented and malloc'd version of the struct that you want.

share|improve this answer
    
AFAIK in C there's no such a thing as variable sized structs or abstract structs (you can fake them, but they are not supported at language level); the only case in which the compiler will tell you that it doesn't know the size of a struct is when the struct is only declared but not defined (useful if in the current compilation unit you just handle pointers to the struct). – Matteo Italia Feb 2 '10 at 12:52

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