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How to calculate modulus of 5^55 modulus 221 without much use of calculator?

I guess there are some simple principles in number theory in cryptography to calculate such things.

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Here is an explanation: devx.com/tips/Tip/39012 –  tur1ng Feb 1 '10 at 15:36
    
the devx link is not of much use, there are other simple methods in number theory for such things, AFAIK. –  Priyank Bolia Feb 1 '10 at 15:42
    
close for what, have you ever read cryptography? –  Priyank Bolia Feb 1 '10 at 15:50
1  
Yeah, many of us are aware that sometimes computer science involves mathematics. –  Jefromi Feb 1 '10 at 16:33
5  
@JB King: MathOverflow is for mathematics at the graduate-level and higher; this question would be frowned upon there. –  Jason Feb 1 '10 at 17:00

9 Answers 9

up vote 47 down vote accepted

Okay, so you want to calculate a^b mod m. First we'll take a naive approach and then see how we can refine it.

First, reduce a mod m. That means, find a number a1 so that 0 <= a1 < m and a = a1 mod m. Then repeatedly in a loop multiply by a1 and reduce again mod m. Thus, in pseudocode:

a1 = a reduced mod m
p = 1
for(int i = 1; i <= b; i++) {
    p *= a1
    p = p reduced mod m
}

By doing this, we avoid numbers larger than m^2. This is the key. The reason we avoid numbers larger than m^2 is because at every step 0 <= p < m and 0 <= a1 < m.

As an example, let's compute 5^55 mod 221. First, 5 is already reduced mod 221.

  1. 1 * 5 = 5 mod 221
  2. 5 * 5 = 25 mod 221
  3. 25 * 5 = 125 mod 221
  4. 125 * 5 = 183 mod 221
  5. 183 * 5 = 31 mod 221
  6. 31 * 5 = 155 mod 221
  7. 155 * 5 = 112 mod 221
  8. 112 * 5 = 118 mod 221
  9. 118 * 5 = 148 mod 221
  10. 148 * 5 = 77 mod 221
  11. 77 * 5 = 164 mod 221
  12. 164 * 5 = 157 mod 221
  13. 157 * 5 = 122 mod 221
  14. 122 * 5 = 168 mod 221
  15. 168 * 5 = 177 mod 221
  16. 177 * 5 = 1 mod 221
  17. 1 * 5 = 5 mod 221
  18. 5 * 5 = 25 mod 221
  19. 25 * 5 = 125 mod 221
  20. 125 * 5 = 183 mod 221
  21. 183 * 5 = 31 mod 221
  22. 31 * 5 = 155 mod 221
  23. 155 * 5 = 112 mod 221
  24. 112 * 5 = 118 mod 221
  25. 118 * 5 = 148 mod 221
  26. 148 * 5 = 77 mod 221
  27. 77 * 5 = 164 mod 221
  28. 164 * 5 = 157 mod 221
  29. 157 * 5 = 122 mod 221
  30. 122 * 5 = 168 mod 221
  31. 168 * 5 = 177 mod 221
  32. 177 * 5 = 1 mod 221
  33. 1 * 5 = 5 mod 221
  34. 5 * 5 = 25 mod 221
  35. 25 * 5 = 125 mod 221
  36. 125 * 5 = 183 mod 221
  37. 183 * 5 = 31 mod 221
  38. 31 * 5 = 155 mod 221
  39. 155 * 5 = 112 mod 221
  40. 112 * 5 = 118 mod 221
  41. 118 * 5 = 148 mod 221
  42. 148 * 5 = 77 mod 221
  43. 77 * 5 = 164 mod 221
  44. 164 * 5 = 157 mod 221
  45. 157 * 5 = 122 mod 221
  46. 122 * 5 = 168 mod 221
  47. 168 * 5 = 177 mod 221
  48. 177 * 5 = 1 mod 221
  49. 1 * 5 = 5 mod 221
  50. 5 * 5 = 25 mod 221
  51. 25 * 5 = 125 mod 221
  52. 125 * 5 = 183 mod 221
  53. 183 * 5 = 31 mod 221
  54. 31 * 5 = 155 mod 221
  55. 155 * 5 = 112 mod 221

Therefore, 5^55 = 112 mod 221.

Now, we can improve this by using exponentiation by squaring; this is the famous trick wherein we reduce exponentiation to requiring only log b multiplications instead of b. Note that with the algorithm that I described above, the exponentiation by squaring improvement, you end up with the right-to-left binary method.

a1 = a reduced mod m
p = 1
while (b > 0) {
     if (b is odd) {
         p *= a1
         p = p reduced mod m
     }
     b /= 2
     a1 = (a1 * a1) reduced mod m
}

Thus, since 55 = 110111 in binary

  1. 1 * 5 = 5 mod 221 (5 is 5^1 mod 221)
  2. 5 * 25 = 125 mod 221 (25 is 5^2 mod 221)
  3. 125 * 183 = 112 mod 221 (183 is 5^4 mod 221)
  4. 112 * 1 = 112 mod 221 (1 is 5^16 mod 221)
  5. 112 * 1 = 112 mod 221 (1 is 5^32 mod 221)

Therefore the answer is 5^55 = 112 mod 221. The reason this works is because

55 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 16 + 32

so that

5^55 = 5^(1 + 2 + 4 + 16 + 32) mod 221
     = 5^1 * 5^2 * 5^4 * 5^16 * 5^32 mod 221
     = 5 * 25 * 183 * 1 * 1 mod 221
     = 22875 mod 221
     = 112 mod 221

In the step where we calculate 5^1 mod 221, 5^2 mod 221, etc. we note that 5^(2^k) = 5^(2^(k-1)) * 5^(2^(k-1)) because 2^k = 2^(k-1) + 2^(k-1) so that we can first compute 5^1 and reduce mod 221, then square this and reduce mod 221 to obtain 5^2 mod 221, etc.

The above algorithm formalizes this idea.

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Well, most programming languages have a built-in operator for this. For example, in C-derived languages, the % operator is the modulus operator. Thus, int p = 625 % 221 would assign 183 to p. You can achieve the same functionality by dividing 625 by 221 as integer division and getting the answer 2. Then you take 625 - 2 * 221 to get the remainder. In this case 625 - 2 * 221 = 183 which is the answer. –  Jason Feb 1 '10 at 15:48
    
this takes too much multiplication 54 times, is there even faster method. –  Priyank Bolia Feb 1 '10 at 15:49
1  
Yes, as I described in the paragraph at the end you do exponentiation by squaring. –  Jason Feb 1 '10 at 15:52
3  
You can actually do much better than exponentiation by squaring, especially in the large-exponent case. Notice that you found that 5^16 == 1 (mod 221). Therefore, 5^k == 5^(k%16) (mod 221). –  Jefromi Feb 1 '10 at 16:01
    
@Jefromi, is there an easy way to find the period of a^b mod c? By easy of course, I mean sublogarithmic. –  JSchlather Feb 1 '10 at 16:28

To add to Jason's answer:

You can speed the process up (which might be helpful for very large exponents) using the binary expansion of the exponent. First calculate 5, 5^2, 5^4, 5^8 mod 221 - you do this by repeated squaring:

 5^1 = 5(mod 221)
 5^2 = 5^2 (mod 221) = 25(mod 221)
 5^4 = (5^2)^2 = 25^2(mod 221) = 625 (mod 221) = 183(mod221)
 5^8 = (5^4)^2 = 183^2(mod 221) = 33489 (mod 221) = 118(mod 221)
5^16 = (5^8)^2 = 118^2(mod 221) = 13924 (mod 221) = 1(mod 221)
5^32 = (5^16)^2 = 1^2(mod 221) = 1(mod 221)

Now we can write

55 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 16 + 32

so 5^55 = 5^1 * 5^2 * 5^4 * 5^16 * 5^32 
        = 5   * 25  * 625 * 1    * 1 (mod 221)
        = 125 * 625 (mod 221)
        = 125 * 183 (mod 183) - because 625 = 183 (mod 221)
        = 22875 ( mod 221)
        = 112 (mod 221)

You can see how for very large exponents this will be much faster (I believe it's log as opposed to linear in b, but not certain.)

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1  
this is even better explanation –  Priyank Bolia Feb 1 '10 at 15:56
1  
I suspect that it's actually much faster (in general) to avoid the exponentiation by squaring, and instead search directly for the least exponent $k$ such that $5^k == 5 (mod 221)$. This does of course depend on size of exponent versus modulus, but once you have that exponent, you just need a single calculation (exponent mod k) and lookup. Note it's also therefore definitely better if you need to repeat similar calculations. (You can't in general look for $a^k == 1 (mod 221)$ since this only happens if $a$ and 221 are relatively prime) –  Jefromi Feb 1 '10 at 16:06
    
well, no, in general finding the least exponent with that property is much slower than sqaure-and-multiply. But if you know the factorization of the modulus then you can easily compute the carmichael lambda function which is a mutliple of your k. –  GregS Feb 2 '10 at 0:31
/* The algorithm is from the book "Discrete Mathematics and Its
   Applications 5th Edition" by Kenneth H. Rosen.
   (base^exp)%mod
*/

int modular(int base, unsigned int exp, unsigned int mod)
{
    int x = 1;
    int power = base % mod;

    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(int) * 8; i++) {
        int least_sig_bit = 0x00000001 & (exp >> i);
        if (least_sig_bit)
            x = (x * power) % mod;
        power = (power * power) % mod;
    }

    return x;
}
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What you're looking for is modular exponentiation, specifically modular binary exponentiation. This wikipedia link has pseudocode.

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Chinese Remainder Theorem comes to mind as an initial point as 221 = 13 * 17. So, break this down into 2 parts that get combined in the end, one for mod 13 and one for mod 17. Second, I believe there is some proof of a^(p-1) = 1 mod p for all non zero a which also helps reduce your problem as 5^55 becomes 5^3 for the mod 13 case as 13*4=52. If you look under the subject of "Finite Fields" you may find some good results on how to solve this.

EDIT: The reason I mention the factors is that this creates a way to factor zero into non-zero elements as if you tried something like 13^2 * 17^4 mod 221, the answer is zero since 13*17=221. A lot of large numbers aren't going to be prime, though there are ways to find large primes as they are used a lot in cryptography and other areas within Mathematics.

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well I don't know the factorials in the first place, and I am trying to prove that the number is a prime, using Miller Rabin Algorithm. So, I am at the opposite end. –  Priyank Bolia Feb 1 '10 at 15:54
    
@Priyank Bolia: Riemann Hypothesis FTW! –  Jason Feb 1 '10 at 16:24
    
There aren't any factorials here, but there is a factorization which is different. The factorial of an integer n is defined as the product of all positive integers less than n,e.g. 2!=2, 3!=6, etc. and is often expressed using the ! symbol. Factorization is different and there isn't a common symbol used to express an integer being factored. –  JB King Feb 1 '10 at 16:54

This is part of code I made for IBAN validation. Feel free to use.

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int modulo = 97;
        string input = Reverse("100020778788920323232343433");
        int result = 0;
        int lastRowValue = 1;

        for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
        {
            // Calculating the modulus of a large number Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Bank_Account_Number                                                                        
            if (i > 0)
            {
                lastRowValue = ModuloByDigits(lastRowValue, modulo);
            }
            result += lastRowValue * int.Parse(input[i].ToString());
        }
        result = result % modulo;
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Result: {0}", result));            
    }

    public static int ModuloByDigits(int previousValue, int modulo)
    {
        // Calculating the modulus of a large number Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Bank_Account_Number                        
        return ((previousValue * 10) % modulo);
    }
    public static string Reverse(string input)
    {
        char[] arr = input.ToCharArray();
        Array.Reverse(arr);
        return new string(arr);
    }
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5^55mod221=(5^10*5^10*5^10*5^10*5^10*5^5)mod221    

          =((5^10)mod221*(5^10*5^10*5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =(77*(5^10*5^10*5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221   

          =((77*5^10)mod221*(5^10*5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =(183*(5^10*5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =((183*5^10)mod221*(5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =(168*5^10*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =((168*5^10)mod 221*(5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =(118*5^10*5^5))mod221 

          =((118*5^10)*(5^5))mod221 

          =(25*5^5)mod 221 

          =112
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Jason is saying that as opposed to first calculating 5^55 and then applying mod 21, you start with 5 mod 221, multiply the result by 5, and loop for a total of 54 times. I.e.

  • 5 mod 221 = 5, 5 * 5 = 25
  • 25 mod 221 = 25, 25 * 5 = 125
  • 125 mod 221 = 125, 125 * 5 = 625
  • 625 mod 221 = 183, 183 * 5 = 915
  • ...

Eventually, you'll calculate 5^55 mod 221

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Just provide another implementation of Jason's answer by C.

After discussing with my classmates, based on Jason's explanation, I like the recursive version more if you don't care about the performance very much:

For example:

#include<stdio.h>

int mypow( int base, int pow, int mod ){
    if( pow == 0 ) return 1;
    if( pow % 2 == 0 ){
        int tmp = mypow( base, pow >> 1, mod );
        return tmp * tmp % mod;
    }
    else{
        return base * mypow( base, pow - 1, mod ) % mod;
    }
}

int main(){
    printf("%d", mypow(5,55,221));
    return 0;
}
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