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I just installed Selenium Web Driver and tried it out. It works great. My use case can be describe as followed:

  1. Start Firefox on a server with pseudo X server (Xvfb)
  2. New Driver.Firefox() object
  3. Open 10 tabs and load a webpage in each tab
  4. Retrieve the html from all loaded pages

The only step that is not working is step 3. I can not find out how to open new tabs. I found this here on SO : How to open a new tab using Selenium WebDriver? However, I tested this locally (i.e. with visible display) on my Mac for debugging purpose and I saw that the Firefox browser (which was opened when creating the driver object) does not open any tabs when doing as described on the SO thread. So I tried this here:

driver = webdriver.Firefox()
driver.get("http://stackoverflow.com/")
body = driver.find_element_by_tag_name("body")
body.send_keys(Keys.CONTROL + 't')

As I said, it does not work for me. So, how else is it possible to open tabs? I use Selenium 2.39 (pip install selenium) and Python 2.7.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the key combination to open a new tab on OSX is Command+T, so you should use

body.send_keys(Keys.COMMAND + 't') 
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Yeah, right. However, this is funnily confusing :). Thanks! –  toom Feb 14 at 18:08
1  
@toom: Just to be clear, it's confusing because Apple made it so, Selenium just follows what's there. –  Yi Zeng Feb 14 at 20:49

It's probably slightly more correct to send it to the browser via action chaining since you're not actually typing text; this also makes your code more readable imo

from selenium.webdriver.common.action_chains import ActionChains
from selenium.webdriver.common.keys import Keys

ActionChains(driver).send_keys(Keys.COMMAND, "t").perform()
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