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I came across this code:

public class RestfulAdage extends Application {
  @Override
  public Set<Class<?>> getClasses() {
    Set<Class<?>> set = new HashSet<Class<?>>();
    set.add(Adages.class);
    return set;
  }
}

I do not understand what Class<?> means.

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i mean Class<?> –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:00
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Class<?> refers to a class of unknown type. The notation uses an unbounded generic which places no restriction on the type of class that can be added to the Collection. For example the following would not work

Set<Class<String>> set = new HashSet<Class<String>>();
set.add(Adages.class); // type not allowed
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but if that is true, then why did this fail: set.add("hello") <-- i thought it can take any type ? –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:08
    
only add null? what good does that do ? –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:12
1  
@user3134565 - "hello" is string instance, not class instance. You can put in the set String.class but not a string instance. You could also put "hello".getClass() –  Avi Feb 14 at 13:14
    
ok i understand now, but what good is that for ? i mean, i can not think of a single good use for this can u ? –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:16
1  
a good example would be a dependency container, to do dependency injection en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_injection generally that kind of thing are used when you are metaprogramming. –  Jarry Feb 14 at 19:00

Class is a parametrizable class, hence you can use the syntax Class where T is a type. By writing Class, you're declaring a Class object which can be of any type (? is a wildcard). The Class type is a type that contains metainformation about a class.

It's always good practice to refer to a generic type by specifying his specific type, by using Class you're respecting this practice (you're aware of Class to be parametrizable) but you're not restricting your parameter to have a specific type.

Reference about Generics and Wildcards: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/wildcards.html

Reference about Class object and reflection the (feature of Java language used to introspect itself): http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/ALT/Reflection/

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It refers to gererics. I suggest you read a little on it. Basically, you know only at runtime what type of object you get to work with. For example, Class can be Integer, String or even YourDefinedClassType
read here http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2SE/generics/

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so does this mean that it can take any kind of object, such as string, integer, double ...etc ? –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:04
1  
set.add("dd") failed, and only takes null... why is that –  user3134565 Feb 14 at 13:15
    
@user3134565 read about generics, not just what people tell you! You can't learn the easy way. you try to add an instance of an object, you need an instance of a class –  diazazar Feb 14 at 14:13

From : Wildcards

In generic code, the question mark (?), called the wildcard, represents an unknown type. The wildcard can be used in a variety of situations: as the type of a parameter, field, or local variable; sometimes as a return type (though it is better programming practice to be more specific). The wildcard is never used as a type argument for a generic method invocation, a generic class instance creation, or a supertype.

Check the link, you will find more exhaustive documentation, examples etc.

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In generic code, the question mark (?), called the wildcard, represents an unknown type. The wildcard can be used in a variety of situations: as the type of a parameter, field, or local variable; sometimes as a return type (though it is better programming practice to be more specific). The wildcard is never used as a type argument for a generic method invocation, a generic class instance creation, or a supertype.

The following sections discuss wildcards in more detail, including upper bounded wildcards, lower bounded wildcards, and wildcard capture.

for more information click here

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2  
could you explain me more plz –  Hadi Feb 14 at 13:52
    
for more information :docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/wildcards.html –  Danyal Feb 15 at 6:53
1  
thank you buddy –  Hadi Feb 15 at 8:03
    
welcome mate :) . –  Danyal Feb 17 at 6:27

Assume that you have a set of classes that belong to different types, and you have instances of different classes as well. So if you want to check whether these instances are instanceof one of these classes, you could iterate through these set and do the job. And for that kind of job, you better use a totally unrestricted set:

public boolean checkClasses(Set<Class<?>> typeLessClassSet, Set instances){

    while(typeLessClassSet.hasNext()){
        Class c = typeLessClassSet.next();
        while(instances.hasNext()){
            Object o = instances.next();
            if(o instanceof c)
            return true;
        }
    }
        return false;    
}
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