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I have a class that holds an array of elements, and I want to give it a GetSize member function. But what return type should I give that function?

I'm using the pimpl idiom, and so in the header file it is not known what the implementation will use to store the elements. So I cannot just say std::vector<T>::size_type, for example:

class FooImpl;

class Foo {
  FooImpl* impl_;
public:
  TYPE GetSize(); // what TYPE??
};
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In the first part of your question you are talking about "an array of elements". In the second part it says "it is not known what the implementation will use to store the elements". So, is your container restricted to C++-array-based implementation or not? Is it possible that the actual implementation will use a list or a tree (or something else) to store the data? Or is it always supposed to be a physical array? –  AndreyT Feb 1 '10 at 17:34
    
@AndreyT: The implementation can use whatever it wants: a C array, its own custom array, an std::vector or whatever. –  Frank Feb 1 '10 at 18:24
    
@dehmann: Well, the question is whether it is a physical array, i.e. a continuous block of memory, or a conceptual array (an associative array, for example). For example, std::map container implements an associative array in C++. Can it be used in your case? You can also use use a linked list to implement a conceptual array (albeit inefficiently). Is this possible in your case? –  AndreyT Feb 1 '10 at 18:49
    
@AndreyT: Yes, I wouldn't exclude a linked-list implementation. –  Frank Feb 2 '10 at 3:34
    
@AndreyT: It is not even guaranteed to be stored in memory completely. The implementation may store part of it on disk. The number of elements might be quite big (order of billions). –  Frank Feb 2 '10 at 3:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the client code can only see Foo (which is the purpose of pimpl idiom), then there's no use in define a specific size_type in the concrete implementation - it won't be visible/accessible to the client anyway. Standard containers can do that since they are built on so called "compile-time polymorphism", while you are specifically trying to use a [potentially] run-time implementation hiding method.

In your situation the only choice would be to choose an integer type that "should be enough for all possible implementations" (like unsigned long, for example) and stick with it.

Another possibility is to use the uintptr_t type, if it is available in your implementation (it is standardized in C99, but not in C++). This integer type is supposed to cover the entire storage address range available to the program, which means that it will always be sufficient for representing the size of any in-memory container. Note, that other posters often use the same logic, but incorrectly arrive at the conclusion that the appropriate type to use here is size_t. (This is usually a result of lack of experience with non-flat memory model implementatioons.) If your containers are always based on physical arrays, size_t will work. However, if your containers are not always array-based, size_t is not even remotely the correct type to use here, since its range is generally smaller than the maximum size of a non-continuous (non-array-based) container.

But in any case, regardelss of what size you are end up using, it is a good idea to hide it behind a typedef-name, just like it is done in standard containers.

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The generic type for sizes in C++ is size_t. I'd use that.

I mean generic in the non-technical sense. This has nothing to do with templates.

Looks like this came up before: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1951519/when-to-use-stdsize-t

edit

After much discussion, I'm going to slightly amend my answer.

If the size_t is as wide as the pointer, use size_t. If not, use an unsigned int of the same width as the pointer.

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2  
Why can't it? It holds an array in his case, and arrays are limited to size_t as well, meaning that it can at most hold size_t/sizeof(element_type) elements, which will always be <= size_t –  jalf Feb 1 '10 at 17:27
1  
@jalf: I assume that the term "array" was used by OP to mean "a linear contaner", not necessarily based on a physical C++ array. The OP explicitly states later that "it is not known what the implementation will use to store the elements". –  AndreyT Feb 1 '10 at 17:31
1  
@AndreyT: Ok, in that case you're right, although I think it's a somewhat academical objection. On most modern systems, and unless you're doing something extremely esoteric, size_t will be safe to use. And since the OP controls the pImpl class, modifying the code if it does require larger collections than size_t is fairly easy. –  jalf Feb 1 '10 at 17:49
1  
@AndreyT: By design, size_t is an unsigned integer big enough to hold the size of any allocation. As a result of this attribute and the sizeof(array)/sizeof(element) idiom, it has become a de facto standard for sizes, including element counts. In what way would it be preferable to use something along the lines of unsigned __int64? –  Steven Sudit Feb 1 '10 at 18:49
3  
every integral type "represents a different concept" though. The same could be said for int or unsigned long or anything else. Ultimately, he's going to have to pick a type that is able to represent the range of sizes he's dealing with, and use that. Of course it can be hidden under a typedef, giving it a more relevant name, but I don't really see how it's a worse choice than any other integral type. –  jalf Feb 1 '10 at 20:01

size_type's are usually used to hide the integer type (short vs. long vs. long long etc). Just define your own Foo::size_type.

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You could follow the STL's lead and make size_type a typedef that relies on FooImpl:

template<typename T> class s_type {
    public:
    typedef size_t type; // good default
};

class FooImpl;

// I'm only doing this specialization to show how it's done
// not because I think it's needed.  In general I'd use size_t.
template<> class s_type<FooImpl> {
    public:
    typedef uintptr_t type;
};

class Foo {
  FooImpl* impl_;

  public:
  typedef size_type s_type<FooImpl>::type;
  size_type GetSize();
};
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If I understand correctly, this solves a similar but distinct problem. –  Steven Sudit Feb 2 '10 at 14:51
    
The question is "what return type should I give that function?" The sticky part is that the return type relies on FooImpl's implementation. This solution gives a return type that relies on FooImpl's implementation. How is this a distinct problem from the OP? –  Max Lybbert Feb 2 '10 at 21:28

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