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I am trying to copy a simple flat list into a nested list. As an example:

from collections import OrderedDict

simple_list = [5,6,7,8]
nested_dict = OrderedDict([('item1', 1), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 2), ('item4', {'item5': 3})])), ('item6',4)]) 

new_nested_dict = unflatten(nested_dict, simple_list)
print new_nested_dict

>>> OrderedDict([('item1', 5), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 6), ('item4', {'item5': 7})])), ('item6',8)]) 

From my research so far, it seems like generators are a good approach. However, after looking through the doc's I still am not entirely clear on how to implement what I want to do using them.

def unflatten(nested_items, flat_data, start=0):    
    if isinstance(nested_items, OrderedDict):
        nested_items = nested_items.values()
    idx = start  
    for x in nested_items:           
        if isinstance(x, Iterable):
            for i in unflatten(x, flat_data, start=idx):
                yield i
        else:
            idx += 1
            yield flat_data[idx]

Can someone point out what I am doing wrong here? I am more then willing to entertain a completely different method as well. Thanks.

share|improve this question

I have no idea why you are doing this, but I believe this simple recursive algorithm works:

from collections import OrderedDict

simple_list = [5,6,7,8]
nested_dict = OrderedDict([('item1', 1), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 2), ('item4', {'item5': 3})])), ('item6',4)]) 

def unflatten(nested_items, flat_data):
    remaining_keys = list(nested_items.keys())
    while flat_data and remaining_keys:
        key = remaining_keys.pop(0)
        existing_value = nested_items[key]
        if isinstance(existing_value, dict):
            unflatten(existing_value, flat_data)
        else:
            nested_items[key] = flat_data.pop(0)

    return nested_items

new_nested_dict = unflatten(nested_dict, simple_list)
assert new_nested_dict == OrderedDict([('item1', 5), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 6), ('item4', {'item5': 7})])), ('item6',8)])

Regarding your existing algorithm, the problem may be in the isinstance(nested_items, OrderedDict) condition. At least one of the objects you put is not an OrderedDict, but a regular dict. I use the latter in my code because it is a super class of former.

Also, yield returns a Generator value, which is more closely related to lazy lists than to dicts. Try playing with them in a more simple context to see what I mean.

share|improve this answer

You can update the existing dictionary in place by doing this:

from collections import OrderedDict, Mapping

simple_list = [5,6,7,8]
nested_dict = OrderedDict([('item1', 1), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 2), ('item4', {'item5': 3})])), ('item6',4)]) 

def update(d, u):
    for k, v in d.iteritems():
        if isinstance(v, Mapping):
            update(d.get(k), u)
        else:
             try:
                d[k] = u.pop(0)
             except IndexError:
                break   
    return d            

update(nested_dict, simple_list)   
print nested_dict
# OrderedDict([('item1', 5), ('item2', OrderedDict([('item3', 6), ('item4', {'item5': 7})])), ('item6', 8)])

Notice that this updated the existing ordered dict in place rather than yielding a new nested dict.

If you want access to the old dict, just use deepcopy to make a copy of it first. Note also that list you pass will be consumed by poping each element in turn. Once again, if you need to keep that data -- make a copy of it with a slice or other copy of the list.

While yielding a generator is efficient, updating in place is even more efficient generally.

share|improve this answer

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