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Consider this log file

SN      PID     Date                            Status
1       P01     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
2       P02     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
3       P03     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
4       P04     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
5       P05     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
6       P06     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
7       P07     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
8       P08     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
9       P09     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
10      P010    Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive

When i do => grep "P01" File
output is : (as expected)

1       P01     Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive
10      P010    Fri Feb 14 19:32:36 IST 2014    Alive

But when i do => grep " P01 " File (notice the space before and after P01)
I do not get any output!

Question : grep matches pattern in a line, so " P01 " ( with space around ) should match the first PID of P01 as it has spaces around it....but seems that this logic is wrong....what obvious thing i am missing here!!!?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the log uses tabs not spaces, your grep pattern won't match. I would add word boundaries to the word you want to find:

grep '\<P01\>' file

If you really want to use whitespace in your pattern, use one of:

grep '[[:blank:]]P01[[:blank:]]' file    # horizontal whitespace, tabs and spaces
grep -P '\sP01\s' file                   # using Perl regex
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yeah,its a tab-space, so tab-space is considered different from a white-space in grep??? –  NoobEditor Feb 14 '14 at 17:51
1  
Generally "whitespace" is meant to include space, tab, newline, carriage return, backspace, vertical tab. A tab is a different character than space, so yes, grep treats them differently. The character class [[:space:]] is equivalent to [ \t\n\r\b\v] and the character class [[:blank:]] is equivalent to [ \t] (I think that's close to correct...) See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascii –  glenn jackman Feb 14 '14 at 17:55
    
Further investigation: \b is not included in [[:space:]] –  glenn jackman Feb 14 '14 at 18:01
    
Further reading: gnu.org/software/grep/manual/… –  glenn jackman Feb 14 '14 at 18:01
1  
Note that the pattern P0[0-9]*0 will also match P001 -- the * quantifier means "zero or more of the previous atom". If you want "P followed by 0 followed by one or more digits followed by 0, end of the word", use 'P0[0-9]+0\>' –  glenn jackman Feb 14 '14 at 18:27

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