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My understanding is that lock free structures do better when there is a lot of contention, and locked data structures do better if there is low contention.

To test that, I wrote the following code:

#include<thread>
#include<chrono>
#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<stack>
#include<mutex>
#include<fstream>
#include <boost/lockfree/stack.hpp>
using namespace std;
mutex mut;

const static int totalNumberOfWorkItems = 100000;
const static int maxNumberOfThreads = 2000;
const static int threadIncrement = 5;

chrono::milliseconds calcRawSpawnTime(int n) {
    auto start = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    vector<thread> ts;
    int j = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        ts.push_back(thread([&](){j += i; }));
    for (auto&& t : ts)
        t.join();
    auto end = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    return chrono::duration_cast<chrono::milliseconds>(end - start);
}


chrono::milliseconds timeNThreadsLock(int n, int worksize){
    stack<int> data;
    vector<thread> ts;
    auto startSpawn = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        ts.push_back(thread([&]() {
        for (int j = 0; j < worksize; j++){
            mut.lock();
            data.push(7);
            mut.unlock();
        }
    }));
    auto startWait = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for (auto&& t : ts)
        t.join();
    auto endWait = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    return chrono::duration_cast<chrono::milliseconds>(endWait - startSpawn);
}

chrono::milliseconds timeNThreadsLockFree(int n, int worksize)
{
    boost::lockfree::stack<int> data;
    vector<thread> ts;
    auto startSpawn = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        ts.push_back(thread([&](){
        for (int j = 0; j < worksize; j++)
            data.push(7);
    }));
    auto startWait = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    for (auto&& t : ts)
        t.join();
    auto endWait = chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    return chrono::duration_cast<chrono::milliseconds>(endWait - startSpawn);
}
int main(int argc, char* argv [])
{
    ofstream lockFile("locklog.log");
    ofstream lockFreeFile("lockfreelog.log");
    ofstream spawnTimes("spawnTimes.log");
    for (int i = 1; i < maxNumberOfThreads; i += threadIncrement){
        cout << i << endl;
        spawnTimes << i << ",\t" << calcRawSpawnTime(i).count() << endl;
        lockFreeFile << i << ",\t" << timeNThreadsLockFree(i, totalNumberOfWorkItems / i).count() << endl;
        lockFile << i << ",\t" << timeNThreadsLock(i, totalNumberOfWorkItems / i).count() << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

The problem is that my lockfree data structure time started to look like this:enter image description here.

I suspected the the problem was the thread creation time (with more threads that obviously not a constant), but subtracting the thread creation time gave this plot:enter image description here

Which is clearly wrong.

Any ideas on how to benchmark this properly?

share|improve this question
    
I would at least create the threads outside the benchmarking code to avoid the whole problems to begin with. Considering the negligible amount of work they do, it's clearly dominated by the thread creation time (not sure how you subtract thread creation time for your second plot?) –  Voo Feb 16 '14 at 0:04
    
@Voo How can I create the threads but not have them start working? For the locked version I simply am able to lock the mutex until all threads have spawned, and then unlock it (and then the threads have a free for all). For the lock free version, I tried to use a condition variable to do the same, and I am getting absurdly low timings (~4ms) for the total. Ideas? –  soandos Feb 16 '14 at 0:36
    
Condition variables for both sounds right, also a push on a vector should be nothing more than a single interlocked add in the common case, so it should be quick. Probably also a good idea to let each thread add several thousand elements sequentially to increase workload - timer accuracy is often only in the 10 ms range. Add the totals up afterwards and print them to make sure no compiler optimization is screwing with you. –  Voo Feb 16 '14 at 1:43
    
Try to increase worksize 10x (if possible). –  Sergey K. Feb 17 '14 at 9:57
    
Did you try double start_time=omp_get_wtime(); ? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Feb 17 '14 at 11:48

2 Answers 2

I suggest that you actually don't measure the time, but the number of operations. So i think you could launch all the threads, and then let the main thread sleep for some time (1 second or more would be acceptable i think). In the tests, each thread should have a private integer to that thread, that is incremented by each operation you make on the data structure. (If you want, you could have different counters for each operation).

Then you could run the tests in something like

int x = random() % 1000; //just some granularity
if(x > 500) {
    some_test_on_the_data_structure();
} else { //you can adjust the limits to perform different number of each operation.
    other_test_on_the_data_structure();
}

Btw, this is the usual tests i make to my data structures and on other multithreaded benchmarks.

share|improve this answer

Have you considered structuring this test as a throughput benchmark, as opposed to a speedup benchmark?

For each thread count, repeat the operation as often as possible for some period, and calculate the throughput as "operations/period". This has the benefit of being easy to tune in terms of experiment time (thread counts to be checked * period ~= experiment time)

You can use a barrier to hold the created threads until everything is ready.


Just one other note, there's nothing in this benchmark that allows you to control contention; Which might be something you'd like.

Doing that depends a little bit on what you think your use case will be, and what data structure you're testing.

In this particular case, one way to do it would be to create an array of your data structures under test. When you're doing insertions, randomly vary the threads among this array. The longer the array, the lower the contention. This models a data structure where you need a 'reduce' operation to get a final value -- which for some tasks may be perfectly sufficient, especially under weak requirements for consistency.

In many other data structures outside a simple stack/vector, contention ends up being a function of the input -- e.g. for a HashMap, the range of the keys and their probability distribution, which you can control as a benchmarker.

share|improve this answer
    
How could I control contention? –  soandos Feb 27 '14 at 6:07
    
@soandos updated! –  Matthew G. Feb 27 '14 at 14:37

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