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Question

What can I do to get a locking mechanism that provides minimal and stable latency while guaranteeing that a thread cannot reacquire a resource before another thread has acquired and released it?

The desirability of answers to this question are ranked as follows:

  1. Some combination of built-in C++11 features that work in MinGW on Windows 7 (note that the <thread> and <mutex> libraries do not work on a Windows platform)

  2. Some combination of Windows API features

  3. A modification to the FairLock listed below, my own attempt at implementing such a mechanism

  4. Some features provided by a free, open-source library that does not require a .configure/make/make install process, (getting that to work in MSYS is more of an adventure than I care for)

Background

I am writing an application which is effectively a multi-stage producer/consumer. One thread generates input consumed by another thread, which produces output consumed by yet another thread. The application uses pairs of buffers so that, after an initial delay, all threads can work nearly simultaneously.

Since I am writing a Windows 7 application, I had been using CriticalSections to guard the buffers. The problem with using CriticalSections (or, so far as I can tell, any other Windows or C++11-built-in synchronization object) is that it does not allow for any provision that a thread that just released a lock cannot reacquire it until another thread has done so first. Because of this, many of my test drivers for the middle thread (the Encoder) never gave the Encoder a chance to acquire the test input buffers and completed without having tested them. The end result was a ridiculous process of trying to determine an artificial wait time that stochastically worked for my machine.

Since the structure of my application requires that each stage waits for the other stage to have acquired, finished using, and released the necessary buffers for getting to use the buffer again, I need, for lack of a better term, a fair locking mechanism. I took a crack at writing one (the source code is provided below). In testing, this FairLock allows my test driver to run my Encoder at the same speeds that I was able to achieve using the CriticalSection maybe 60% of the runs. The other 40% of the runs take anywhere between 10 to 100 ms longer, which is not acceptable for my application.

FairLock

// FairLock.hpp
#ifndef FAIRLOCK_HPP
#define FAIRLOCK_HPP
#include <atomic>
using namespace std;
class FairLock {
    private:
        atomic_bool owned {false};
        atomic<DWORD> lastOwner {0};
    public:
        FairLock(bool owned);
        bool inline hasLock() const;
        bool tryLock();
        void seizeLock();
        void tryRelease();
        void waitForLock();
};
#endif

// FairLock.cpp
#include <windows.h>
#include "FairLock.hpp"
#define ID GetCurrentThreadId()

FairLock::FairLock(bool owned) {
    if (owned) {
        this->owned = true;
        this->lastOwner = ID;
    } else {
        this->owned = false;
        this->lastOwner = 0;
    }
}

bool inline FairLock::hasLock() const {
    return owned && lastOwner == ID;
}

bool FairLock::tryLock() {
    bool success = false;
    DWORD id = ID;
    if (owned) {
        success = lastOwner == id;
    } else if (
        lastOwner != id &&
        owned.compare_exchange_strong(success, true)
    ) {
        lastOwner = id;
        success = true;
    } else {
        success = false;
    }
    return success;
}

void FairLock::seizeLock() {
    bool success = false;
    DWORD id = ID;
    if (!(owned && lastOwner == id)) {
        while (!owned.compare_exchange_strong(success, true)) {
            success = false;
        }
        lastOwner = id;
    }
}

void FairLock::tryRelease() {
    if (hasLock()) {
        owned = false;
    }
}

void FairLock::waitForLock() {
    bool success = false;
    DWORD id = ID;
    if (!(owned && lastOwner == id)) {
        while (lastOwner == id); // spin
        while (!owned.compare_exchange_strong(success, true)) {
            success = false;
        }
        lastOwner = id;
    }
}

EDIT

DO NOT USE THIS FairLock CLASS; IT DOES NOT GUARANTEE MUTUAL EXCLUSION!

I reviewed the above code to compare it against The C++ Programming Language: 4th Edition text I had not read carefully and what CouchDeveloper's recommended Synchronous Queue. I realized that there are several sequences in which the thread that just released the FairLock can be tricked into thinking it still owns it. All it takes is interleaving instructions as follows:

New owner: set owned to true
Old owner: is owned true?  yes
Old owner: am I the last owner? yes
New owner: set me as the last owner

At this point, the old and new owners both enter their critical sections.

I am considering whether this problem has a solution and whether it is worth attempting to solve this at all. In the meantime, don't use this unless you see a fix.

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried using Intel's TBB library? They've worked out some very high-quality code for creating concurrent workflows. – Cory Nelson Feb 14 '14 at 19:38
    
<thread> et al work correctly in recent MinGW-w64 builds. – Casey Feb 14 '14 at 19:47
    
@Cory Nelson: I've spent some time looking over its documentation. It does not look like it provides what I need, but I might just be missing it. – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 20:46
    
@Casey - Thanks for that information. I will put this to the test later tonight. – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 20:47
    
Please note that your implementation is not thread-safe: it lacks memory barriers, which are likely not used for atomic_bool. – CouchDeveloper Feb 14 '14 at 21:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it's useful:

This demonstrates *) an implementation of a "synchronous queue" using semaphores as synchronization primitives.

Note: the actually implementation uses semaphores implemented with GCD (Grand Central Dispatch):

using gcd::mutex;
using gcd::semaphore;


// A blocking queue in which each put must wait for a get, and vice 
// versa. A synchronous queue does not have any internal capacity, 
// not even a capacity of one. 

template <typename T>
class simple_synchronous_queue {
public:

    typedef T value_type;

    enum result_type {
        OK = 0,
        TIMEOUT_NOT_DELIVERED = -1,
        TIMEOUT_NOT_PICKED = -2,
        TIMEOUT_NOTHING_OFFERED = -3
    };

    simple_synchronous_queue() 
    : sync_(0), send_(1), recv_(0)
    {
    }

    void put(const T& v) {
        send_.wait();
        new (address()) T(v);
        recv_.signal();
        sync_.wait();
    }

    result_type put(const T& v, double timeout) {
        if (send_.wait(timeout)) {
            new (storage_) T(v);
            recv_.signal();
            if (sync_.wait(timeout)) {
                return OK;
            }
            else {
                return TIMEOUT_NOT_PICKED;
            }
        }
        else {
            return TIMEOUT_NOT_DELIVERED;
        }        
    }

    T get() {
        recv_.wait();
        T result = *address();
        address()->~T();
        sync_.signal();
        send_.signal();
        return result;
    }

    std::pair<result_type, T> get(double timeout) {
        if (recv_.wait(timeout)) {
            std::pair<result_type, T> result = 
                std::pair<result_type, T>(OK, *address());
            address()->~T();
            sync_.signal();
            send_.signal();
            return result;
        }
        else {
            return std::pair<result_type, T>(TIMEOUT_NOTHING_OFFERED, T());
        }
    }    

private:
    using storage_t = typename std::aligned_storage<sizeof(T), std::alignment_of<T>::value>::type;

    T* address() { 
        return static_cast<T*>(static_cast<void*>(&storage_));
    }

    storage_t   storage_;
    semaphore   sync_;
    semaphore   send_;
    semaphore   recv_;
};

*) demonstrates: be carefully about potential issues, could be improved, etc. ... ;)

share|improve this answer
1  
typename std::aligned_storage<T>::type _storage needs to be typename std::aligned_storage<sizeof(T), alignof(T)>::type storage_. Also, all of the reinterpret_casts seem to think it is a pointer. – Casey Feb 14 '14 at 22:24
    
This looks to be pretty good. Googling "gcd" for C++ doesn't seem to turn anything up. Where can I find it? – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 22:32
    
@Casey tried to fix it ;) – CouchDeveloper Feb 14 '14 at 22:32
    
@gamecoder GCD (Grand Central Dispatch) is an Apple technology - but also OpenSource and ported to different platforms (e.g. BSD, Linux). You don't need GCD to implement these kind of semaphores, though. On the other hand, GCD would be an option, too, to solve your problem. However, on Windows... :/ – CouchDeveloper Feb 14 '14 at 22:36
    
I'm going to be leaving in a bit, but I'll look at implementing a semaphore with the tools that work on Windows later tonight. If Cory Nelson is right in the MinGW library having been repaired, I might be able to do this with C++-standard types as opposed to yet more Windows-specific code. – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 22:41

I would implement this in C++11 using a condition_variable-per-thread setup so that I could choose exactly which thread to wake up when (Live demo at Coliru):

class FairMutex {
private:
  class waitnode {
    std::condition_variable cv_;
    waitnode* next_ = nullptr;
    FairMutex& fmtx_;
  public:
    waitnode(FairMutex& fmtx) : fmtx_(fmtx) {
      *fmtx.tail_ = this;
      fmtx.tail_ = &next_;
    }

    ~waitnode() {
      for (waitnode** p = &fmtx_.waiters_; *p; p = &(*p)->next_) {
        if (*p == this) {
          *p = next_;
          if (!next_) {
            fmtx_.tail_ = &fmtx_.waiters_;
          }
          break;
        }
      }
    }

    void wait(std::unique_lock<std::mutex>& lk) {
      while (fmtx_.held_ || fmtx_.waiters_ != this) {
        cv_.wait(lk);
      }
    }

    void notify() {
      cv_.notify_one();
    }
  };

  waitnode* waiters_ = nullptr;
  waitnode** tail_ = &waiters_;
  std::mutex mtx_;
  bool held_ = false;

public:
  void lock() {
    auto lk = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>{mtx_};
    if (held_ || waiters_) {
      waitnode{*this}.wait(lk);
    }
    held_ = true;
  }

  bool try_lock() {
    if (mtx_.try_lock()) {
      std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lk(mtx_, std::adopt_lock);
      if (!held_ && !waiters_) {
        held_ = true;
        return true;
      }
    }
    return false;
  }

  void unlock() {
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lk(mtx_);
    held_ = false;
    if (waiters_ != nullptr) {
      waiters_->notify();
    }
  }
};

FairMutex models the Lockable concept so it can be used like any other standard library mutex type. Put simply, it achieves fairness by inserting waiters into a list in arrival order, and passing the mutex to the first waiter in the list when unlocking.

share|improve this answer
    
I got paranoid about the fact that the insert-wait-delete process inside lock wasn't robust against exceptions or early returns, and decided to encapsulate all that logic inside the waitnode RAII-style. – Casey Feb 14 '14 at 21:35
    
Perhaps I am reading this code wrong, but this class does not seem to protect against my core condition that a thread should not be able to acquire a resource twice in a row. Am I missing something? – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 21:41
    
@gamecoder No, you read correctly. I missed that requirement and was aiming for FIFO locking as a fairness criterion. I'll leave the answer here anyway as it illustrates a general approach for impementing a mutex with a desired locking policy using the standard library mechanisms: building a data structure with one thread per condition variable for controlled waits. – Casey Feb 14 '14 at 21:52
    
Thanks for your efforts. The only reason I used the word "fair" was that I don't know how else to describe resource allocation where a thread cannot claim the resource twice. I know that "fair" really means that all threads gets a relatively even shot at claiming a resource without necessarily specifying order restrictions. Sometimes, my greatest limitation in learning is not knowing the word for the concept I am trying to understand. – sadakatsu Feb 14 '14 at 21:57

I accepted CouchDeveloper's answer since it pointed me down the right path. I wrote a Windows-specific C++11 implementation of a synchronous queue, and added this answer so that others could consider/use it if they so choose.

// SynchronousQueue.hpp
#ifndef SYNCHRONOUSQUEUE_HPP
#define SYNCHRONOUSQUEUE_HPP

#include <atomic>
#include <exception>
#include <windows>

using namespace std;

class CouldNotEnterException: public exception {};
class NoPairedCallException: public exception {};

template typename<T>
class SynchronousQueue {
    private:
        atomic_bool valueReady {false};

        CRITICAL_SECTION getCriticalSection;
        CRITICAL_SECTION putCriticalSection;

        DWORD wait {0};

        HANDLE getSemaphore;
        HANDLE putSemaphore;

        const T* address {nullptr};

    public:
        SynchronousQueue(DWORD waitMS): wait {waitMS}, address {nullptr} {
            initializeCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection);
            initializeCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection);

            getSemaphore = CreateSemaphore(nullptr, 0, 1, nullptr);
            putSemaphore = CreateSemaphore(nullptr, 0, 1, nullptr);
        }

        ~SynchronousQueue() {
            EnterCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection);
            EnterCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection);

            CloseHandle(getSemaphore);
            CloseHandle(putSemaphore);

            DeleteCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection);
            DeleteCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection);
        }

        void put(const T& value) {
            if (!TryEnterCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection)) {
                throw CouldNotEnterException();
            }

            ReleaseSemaphore(putSemaphore, (LONG) 1, nullptr);

            if (WaitForSingleObject(getSemaphore, wait) != WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
                if (WaitForSingleObject(putSemaphore, 0) == WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
                    LeaveCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection);
                    throw NoPairedCallException();
                } else {
                    WaitForSingleObject(getSemaphore, 0);
                }
            }

            address = &value;
            valueReady = true;
            while (valueReady);

            LeaveCriticalSection(&putCriticalSection);
        }

        T get() {
            if (!TryEnterCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection)) {
                throw CouldNotEnterException();
            }

            ReleaseSemaphore(getSemaphore, (LONG) 1, nullptr);

            if (WaitForSingleObject(putSemaphore, wait) != WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
                if (WaitForSingleObject(getSemaphore, 0) == WAIT_OBJECT_0) {
                    LeaveCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection);
                    throw NoPairedCallException();
                } else {
                    WaitForSingleObject(putSemaphore, 0);
                }
            }

            while (!valueReady);
            T toReturn = *address;
            valueReady = false;

            LeaveCriticalSection(&getCriticalSection);

            return toReturn;
        }
};

#endif
share|improve this answer

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