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Is there any class in the .NET framework that can read/write standard .ini files:

[Section]
<keyname>=<value>
...

Delphi has the TIniFile component and I want to know if there is anything similar for C#?

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RemObjects has a Delphi Prism library called ShineOn that ships a similar INI file class. But you need to have Delphi Prism to compile it for .NET from source as there is not yet a compiled assembly available. code.remobjects.com/p/shineon –  Lex Li Sep 27 '09 at 1:13
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10 Answers

up vote 86 down vote accepted

The creators of the .NET framework want you to use XML-based config files, rather than ini files. So no, there is no builtin mechanism for reading them.

There are third party solutions available though. Take a look at:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/cs_ini.aspx and
http://jachman.wordpress.com/2006/09/11/how-to-access-ini-files-in-c-net/

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12  
for manual editing INI files are much better in many ways –  aloneguid Apr 23 '13 at 19:21
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This article on CodeProject "An INI file handling class using C#" should help.

The author created a C# class "Ini" which exposes two functions from KERNEL32.dll. These functions are: WritePrivateProfileString and GetPrivateProfileString. You will need two namespaces: System.Runtime.InteropServices and System.Text.

Steps to use the Ini class

In your project namespace definition add

using INI;

Create a INIFile like this

INIFile ini = new INIFile("C:\\test.ini");

Use IniWriteValue to write a new value to a specific key in a section or use IniReadValue to read a value FROM a key in a specific Section.

Note: if you're beginning from scratch, you could read this MSDN article: How to: Add Application Configuration Files to C# Projects. It's a better way for configuring your application.

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I want to read complete INI file. How to do the same instead of reading section,key –  sukumar Mar 11 '10 at 10:36
1  
Thanks for the MSDN Article! –  cimnine Jul 18 '11 at 18:33
    
this worked for me, and then stopped working from another point. No idea still what went different under the hood –  nawfal Jun 8 '12 at 8:55
    
Watch out using this deprecated Win32 API functions. More info: stackoverflow.com/questions/11451641/… –  Pedro77 Jun 21 at 22:28
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I found this simple implementation:

http://bytes.com/topic/net/insights/797169-reading-parsing-ini-file-c

Works well for what I need.

Here is how you use it:

public class TestParser
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        IniParser parser = new IniParser(@"C:\test.ini");

        String newMessage;

        newMessage = parser.GetSetting("appsettings", "msgpart1");
        newMessage += parser.GetSetting("appsettings", "msgpart2");
        newMessage += parser.GetSetting("punctuation", "ex");

        //Returns "Hello World!"
        Console.WriteLine(newMessage);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Here is the code:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Collections;

public class IniParser
{
    private Hashtable keyPairs = new Hashtable();
    private String iniFilePath;

    private struct SectionPair
    {
        public String Section;
        public String Key;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Opens the INI file at the given path and enumerates the values in the IniParser.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="iniPath">Full path to INI file.</param>
    public IniParser(String iniPath)
    {
        TextReader iniFile = null;
        String strLine = null;
        String currentRoot = null;
        String[] keyPair = null;

        iniFilePath = iniPath;

        if (File.Exists(iniPath))
        {
            try
            {
                iniFile = new StreamReader(iniPath);

                strLine = iniFile.ReadLine();

                while (strLine != null)
                {
                    strLine = strLine.Trim().ToUpper();

                    if (strLine != "")
                    {
                        if (strLine.StartsWith("[") && strLine.EndsWith("]"))
                        {
                            currentRoot = strLine.Substring(1, strLine.Length - 2);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            keyPair = strLine.Split(new char[] { '=' }, 2);

                            SectionPair sectionPair;
                            String value = null;

                            if (currentRoot == null)
                                currentRoot = "ROOT";

                            sectionPair.Section = currentRoot;
                            sectionPair.Key = keyPair[0];

                            if (keyPair.Length > 1)
                                value = keyPair[1];

                            keyPairs.Add(sectionPair, value);
                        }
                    }

                    strLine = iniFile.ReadLine();
                }

            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw ex;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (iniFile != null)
                    iniFile.Close();
            }
        }
        else
            throw new FileNotFoundException("Unable to locate " + iniPath);

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the value for the given section, key pair.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sectionName">Section name.</param>
    /// <param name="settingName">Key name.</param>
    public String GetSetting(String sectionName, String settingName)
    {
        SectionPair sectionPair;
        sectionPair.Section = sectionName.ToUpper();
        sectionPair.Key = settingName.ToUpper();

        return (String)keyPairs[sectionPair];
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Enumerates all lines for given section.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sectionName">Section to enum.</param>
    public String[] EnumSection(String sectionName)
    {
        ArrayList tmpArray = new ArrayList();

        foreach (SectionPair pair in keyPairs.Keys)
        {
            if (pair.Section == sectionName.ToUpper())
                tmpArray.Add(pair.Key);
        }

        return (String[])tmpArray.ToArray(typeof(String));
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds or replaces a setting to the table to be saved.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sectionName">Section to add under.</param>
    /// <param name="settingName">Key name to add.</param>
    /// <param name="settingValue">Value of key.</param>
    public void AddSetting(String sectionName, String settingName, String settingValue)
    {
        SectionPair sectionPair;
        sectionPair.Section = sectionName.ToUpper();
        sectionPair.Key = settingName.ToUpper();

        if (keyPairs.ContainsKey(sectionPair))
            keyPairs.Remove(sectionPair);

        keyPairs.Add(sectionPair, settingValue);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds or replaces a setting to the table to be saved with a null value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sectionName">Section to add under.</param>
    /// <param name="settingName">Key name to add.</param>
    public void AddSetting(String sectionName, String settingName)
    {
        AddSetting(sectionName, settingName, null);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Remove a setting.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sectionName">Section to add under.</param>
    /// <param name="settingName">Key name to add.</param>
    public void DeleteSetting(String sectionName, String settingName)
    {
        SectionPair sectionPair;
        sectionPair.Section = sectionName.ToUpper();
        sectionPair.Key = settingName.ToUpper();

        if (keyPairs.ContainsKey(sectionPair))
            keyPairs.Remove(sectionPair);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Save settings to new file.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="newFilePath">New file path.</param>
    public void SaveSettings(String newFilePath)
    {
        ArrayList sections = new ArrayList();
        String tmpValue = "";
        String strToSave = "";

        foreach (SectionPair sectionPair in keyPairs.Keys)
        {
            if (!sections.Contains(sectionPair.Section))
                sections.Add(sectionPair.Section);
        }

        foreach (String section in sections)
        {
            strToSave += ("[" + section + "]\r\n");

            foreach (SectionPair sectionPair in keyPairs.Keys)
            {
                if (sectionPair.Section == section)
                {
                    tmpValue = (String)keyPairs[sectionPair];

                    if (tmpValue != null)
                        tmpValue = "=" + tmpValue;

                    strToSave += (sectionPair.Key + tmpValue + "\r\n");
                }
            }

            strToSave += "\r\n";
        }

        try
        {
            TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(newFilePath);
            tw.Write(strToSave);
            tw.Close();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Save settings back to ini file.
    /// </summary>
    public void SaveSettings()
    {
        SaveSettings(iniFilePath);
    }
}
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1  
A nice light-weight solution! –  Jeff Roe Apr 15 '11 at 23:16
    
I love this. Too bad that it's all uppercased. –  Larry Jun 6 '13 at 20:15
1  
-1 for not using StringBuilder when building output and not preparing UpperCased value before loop. Also I miss Set<T> and Get<T> methods for loading ints/bools and other base types. Also you don't handle comments. –  Vyktor Sep 6 '13 at 7:25
13  
+1 to offset above downvote. What do you really complain about? He said he FOUND it. Do you downvote him for not finding one with generic accessors and stringbuilder usage? –  Tormod Sep 15 '13 at 21:41
1  
I think you stretch the definition of "flaw". If the solution does not emphasize your sensitivities, then simply do not upvote. I just left a note saying that I already negated his downvote so that the other 7 guys who upvoted my comment wouldn't do this themselves. –  Tormod Feb 21 at 13:29
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Here's a nice and concise implementation I wrote, utilising the original Windows P/Invoke.

Add a new class called IniFile.cs to your project:

using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;

// Change this to match your program's normal namespace
namespace MyProg
{
    class IniFile   // revision 10
    {
        string Path;
        string EXE = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Name;

        [DllImport("kernel32")]
        static extern long WritePrivateProfileString(string Section, string Key, string Value, string FilePath);

        [DllImport("kernel32")]
        static extern int GetPrivateProfileString(string Section, string Key, string Default, StringBuilder RetVal, int Size, string FilePath);

        public IniFile(string IniPath = null)
        {
            Path = new FileInfo(IniPath ?? EXE + ".ini").FullName.ToString();
        }

        public string Read(string Key, string Section = null)
        {
            var RetVal = new StringBuilder(255);
            GetPrivateProfileString(Section ?? EXE, Key, "", RetVal, 255, Path);
            return RetVal.ToString();
        }

        public void Write(string Key, string Value, string Section = null)
        {
            WritePrivateProfileString(Section ?? EXE, Key, Value, Path);
        }

        public void DeleteKey(string Key, string Section = null)
        {
            Write(Key, null, Section ?? EXE);
        }

        public void DeleteSection(string Section = null)
        {
            Write(null, null, Section ?? EXE);
        }

        public bool KeyExists(string Key, string Section = null)
        {
            return Read(Key, Section).Length > 0;
        }
    }
}

Open the INI file in one of the 3 following ways:

// Creates or loads an INI file in the same directory as your executable
// named EXE.ini (where EXE is the name of your executable)
var MyIni = new IniFile();

// Or specify a specific name in the current dir
var MyIni = new IniFile("Settings.ini");

// Or specify a specific name in a specific dir
var MyIni = new IniFile(@"C:\Settings.ini");

You can write some values like so:

MyIni.Write("DefaultVolume", "100");
MyIni.Write("HomePage", "http://www.google.com");

To create a file like this:

[MyProg]
DefaultVolume=100
HomePage=http://www.google.com

To read the values out of the INI file:

var DefaultVolume = IniFile.Read("DefaultVolume");
var HomePage = IniFile.Read("HomePage");

Optionally, you can set [Section]'s:

MyIni.Write("DefaultVolume", "100", "Audio");
MyIni.Write("HomePage", "http://www.google.com", "Web");

To create a file like this:

[Audio]
DefaultVolume=100

[Web]
HomePage=http://www.google.com

You can also check for the existence of a key like so:

if(!MyIni.KeyExists("DefaultVolume", "Audio"))
{
    MyIni.Write("DefaultVolume", "100", "Audio");
}

You can delete a key like so:

MyIni.DeleteKey("DefaultVolume", "Audio");

You can also delete a whole section (including all keys) like so:

MyIni.DeleteSection("Web");

Please feel free to comment with any improvements!

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Usually, when you create applications using C# and the .NET framework, you will not use INI files. It is more common to store settings in an XML-based configuration file or in the registry. However, if your software shares settings with a legacy application it may be easier to use its configuration file, rather than duplicating the information elsewhere.

The .NET framework does not support the use of INI files directly. However, you can use Windows API functions with Platform Invocation Services (P/Invoke) to write to and read from the files. In this link we create a class that represents INI files and uses Windows API functions to manipulate them. Please go through the following link.

Reading and Writing INI Files

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Please check out Cinchoo framework. It provides a class to create, read INI files.

For a sample ini file below,

    [PRODUCT]
    VERSION=1.002 ;Version Comment
    COMPANY=NAG Groups LLC
    ADDRESS=10 River Road, \
            Orlando, \
            FL 100230.

One way of reading key-value as below

using (ChoIniDocument iniDocument = ChoIniDocument.Load(@"C:\Temp\TestIni1.ini"))
{
    Console.Writeline(iniDocument["PRODUCT"]["ADDRESS"]);
}
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You could use SharpConfig to read .cfg and/or .ini files. It's an easy to use config library for .NET.

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There is an Ini Parser available in CommonLibrary.NET

This has various very convenient overloads for getting sections/values and is very light weight.

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1  
In case it's not obvious from looking at the top level of the library (it wasn't obvious to me!), the IniDcoument class et al are in ComLib.IO. –  Tim Keating Apr 21 '10 at 15:50
    
For anyone looking at this route, CommonLibrary.NET does not seem to follow .INI conventions. It uses a colon ":" as the delimiter instead of equals sign, and it does not handle comments (beginning a line with a semi-colon or pound sign will cause parsing to fail). –  jimueller Dec 2 '13 at 22:26
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The code in joerage's answer is inspiring.

Unfortunately, it changes the character casing of the keys and does not handle comments. So I wrote something that should be robust enough to read (only) very dirty INI files and allows to retrieve keys as they are.

It uses some LINQ, a nested case insensitive string dictionary to store sections, keys and values, and read the file in one go.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;

class IniReader
{
    Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>> ini = new Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, string>>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

    public IniReader(string file)
    {
        var txt = File.ReadAllText(file);

        Dictionary<string, string> currentSection = new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

        ini[""] = currentSection;

        foreach(var line in txt.Split(new[]{"\n"}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                               .Where(t => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(t))
                               .Select(t => t.Trim()))
        {
            if (line.StartsWith(";"))
                continue;

            if (line.StartsWith("[") && line.EndsWith("]"))
            {
                currentSection = new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
                ini[line.Substring(1, line.LastIndexOf("]") - 1)] = currentSection;
                continue;
            }

            var idx = line.IndexOf("=");
            if (idx == -1)
                currentSection[line] = "";
            else
                currentSection[line.Substring(0, idx)] = line.Substring(idx + 1);
        }
    }

    public string GetValue(string key)
    {
        return GetValue(key, "", "");
    }

    public string GetValue(string key, string section)
    {
        return GetValue(key, section, "");
    }

    public string GetValue(string key, string section, string @default)
    {
        if (!ini.ContainsKey(section))
            return @default;

        if (!ini[section].ContainsKey(key))
            return @default;

        return ini[section][key];
    }

    public string[] GetKeys(string section)
    {
        if (!ini.ContainsKey(section))
            return new string[0];

        return ini[section].Keys.ToArray();
    }

    public string[] GetSections()
    {
        return ini.Keys.Where(t => t != "").ToArray();
    }
}
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I want to introduce an IniParser library I've created completely in c#, so it contains no dependencies in any OS, which makes it Mono compatible. Open Source with MIT license -so it can be used in any code.

You can check out the source in GitHub, and it is also available as a NuGet package

It's heavily configurable, and really simple to use.

Sorry for the shameless plug but I hope it can be of help of anyone revisiting this answer.

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