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I have a query like this:

SELECT TOP 1 ID, DATA, OTHERINF FROM MYTABLE WHERE DATE = @DATE

and after reading the row data and using it I want to update that retrieved row and change one of it's columns (in another transaction).

But as you see here i searched for that row twice. Is there any way that I keep remember the row and do the update without searching again.

Thank you.

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2  
huh ??????????? –  JonH Feb 1 '10 at 19:48
    
Based on comments that you are giving, I think this question needs to be reworked to state what you are trying to accomplish –  Mitchel Sellers Feb 1 '10 at 20:30
    
Maximizing the efficiency. Some kind of pointer that points to the row to easily change it. –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 20:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I know its out of vogue but you can also do positioned updates on cursors e.g.

use Northwind
GO



DECLARE EMP_CURSOR CURSOR 
FOR SELECT TOP 1 EmployeeID, LastName FROM EMPLOYEES WHERE  HireDate = '1994-11-15'
FOR UPDATE OF LastName

OPEN EMP_CURSOR

FETCH NEXT FROM EMP_CURSOR 

UPDATE EMPLOYEES
SET LastName = LastName + CAST(DatePart(ms,GetDate()) as char(3))
WHERE CURRENT OF EMP_CURSOR


CLOSE EMP_CURSOR

DEALLOCATE  EMP_CURSOR
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Do cursors remain between different transactions? –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 23:22
    
Cursors remain open until either they are closed or the connection is closed. So it depends a lot on you. Note that 2005 added LOCAL and GLOBAL keywords to cursors –  Conrad Frix Feb 2 '10 at 18:30

In the first query you retrieved the id. In the second query use that to find the row to update instead of using the date:

UPDATE MYTABLE
SET DATA = 'FooBar'
WHERE ID = 200
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Note that this presumes that ID is PK or at least indexed. –  Michael Bray Feb 1 '10 at 19:52
    
+1 No need to search as long as you hang on to an indexed column. –  Jon Feb 1 '10 at 19:53
    
But this way I should have an index on id. Any better way? –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 19:55
    
Your id isn't indexed? Don't you have any primary key for your table? Having a primary key is the better way. –  Mark Byers Feb 1 '10 at 19:56
    
Does primary key mean having an index on that column? –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 20:00
--Note, need to setup proper data types
DECLARE @Id INT
DECLARE @Data VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @OtherInf VARCHAR(max)

SELECT TOP 1 @id = Id, @Data = Data, @OtherInf = OtherInf
FROM MyTable
WHERE Date = @Date

--Now you can do what you need, using the info above.

This should do it

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But I wanted a way for not searching twice. Your solution just provided information not a way for solving the problem. –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 19:54
    
You note that you are wanting to use the information in ANOTHER transaction, therefore, I would assume that you have intermediate processing. –  Mitchel Sellers Feb 1 '10 at 20:29

You can combine the UPDATE with the SELECT into one statement, but not across two transactions. Therefore, if you need to update the value in another transaction than you select it (the reason for this is unclear to me), you need two statements.

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I presume that the DATE column isn't indexed (if not, why not?) Your best bet, then, is to make sure you retrieve the primary key (isn't that ID?) and then use that as your condition in the update.

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I have an index on DATE. –  Shayan Feb 1 '10 at 20:01

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