Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm quite new to SQL Server, but I still manage to do most of the things I need. However, there is one thing I just can't understand and that it working with dates. I have a database like this used for recording sales:

**Sales**  
    [index] int
    timestamp datetime
    username varchar(10)
    type int
    amount int
    value int
    location int
    receipt text

**Demo**
    index   timestamp   username    type    amount  value   location    receipt
    1   2013-08-14 11:29:29.367 andrer  1   1   10  2   *long text*

I have to queries I'm trying to do... The first one is having a table of the last 7 days, showing me the number of customers each day. My main problem was to be able to order the output correctly while still displaying it in the format of 15.02.2014. This is what I ended up with. While it works as it should.. is there a easier way of writing it?

SELECT CONVERT(varchar, DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])), 104) as [timestamp], 
       COUNT([username]) as a 
FROM [sales] 
WHERE [timestamp] >= DATEADD(day,-7, GETDATE()) 
GROUP BY DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])) 
ORDER BY [timestamp]

My other question is regarding making a table that consists of the name of the month and the number of customers for the current and last year. This is something I've been struggling the last couple of weeks and can't get my head around how to solve.

Using the same table as above, I'm trying to get and output like this, where the first column is the name of the month, the second is the number of customers for the current year, followed by a column for the number of customers the previous year.

January | 1345 | 299 |
February | 231 | 342 |

...

Sadly I have no working code yet for the current year/previous year query and hope that someone of you knows an easy way of writing it. :)

share|improve this question
    
Which version of SQL Server? 2005, 2008 and 2012 all have increasing capabilities. – MatBailie Feb 15 '14 at 10:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT DATENAME(MONTH,[timestamp]) [Month]
      ,COUNT(DISTINCT CASE WHEN YEAR([timestamp]) = YEAR(GETDATE())   
                             THEN username ELSE NULL END) CurrentYear
      ,COUNT(DISTINCT CASE WHEN YEAR([timestamp]) = YEAR(GETDATE())-1 
                             THEN username ELSE NULL END) LastYear
FROM Sales
GROUP BY DATENAME(MONTH,[timestamp]), MONTH([timestamp])
ORDER BY MONTH([timestamp])

This will return the data in the format of

╔═══════════╦═════════════╦══════════╗
║   Month   ║ CurrentYear ║ LastYear ║
╠═══════════╬═════════════╬══════════╣
║ February  ║        1000 ║ 0        ║
║ March     ║        1235 ║ 202      ║
║ September ║        1750 ║ 787      ║
╚═══════════╩═════════════╩══════════╝
share|improve this answer

For your second question, you may use Pivot as shown below:

select * from
(select distinct datepart(MONTH,datetimestamp) [month], datepart(year,datetimestamp)        [year],
count(username) 
over (partition by datepart(month,datetimestamp), datepart(year, datetimestamp)) [number] 
from Sales) as abc
pivot
(
sum(number)
for [year] in ([2013],[2014])
) as pivottable;
share|improve this answer

For your first question :

SELECT CONVERT(varchar, DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])), 104) as [timestamp], 
       COUNT([username]) as a 
FROM [sales] 
WHERE [timestamp] >= DATEADD(day,-7, GETDATE()) 
GROUP BY DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])) 
ORDER BY  DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp]))

For your second request you can try this:

SELECT datename(month,[timestamp]) as [monthname], COUNT([username]) as Customers, YEAR([timestamp])  as orderyear              
FROM [sales]
GROUP BY  datename(month,[timestamp]), YEAR([timestamp]) 
share|improve this answer

It's a bit confusing to have the ORDER BY on the alias that has the same name as the underlying field, but otherwise I think there is little to improve to your query.

(I probably would put ORDER BY DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])))

As for having an overview you could use a PIVOT table.

Some example code:

-- create a test-table
IF OBJECT_ID('test') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE [test] 
GO
CREATE TABLE [test] ( [timestamp] datetime, username int)
GO
-- create some test-data
INSERT [test] ([timestamp], [username])
SELECT TOP 100000
       timestamp = DateAdd(second, - (ABS(BINARY_CHECKSUM(NewID())) % (60 * 60 * 24 * 365 *5)), CURRENT_TIMESTAMP),
       username = ABS(BINARY_CHECKSUM(NewID())) % 10000
  FROM sys.objects o1, sys.objects o2, sys.objects o3

GO

-- original query
SELECT CONVERT(varchar, DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])), 104) as [timestamp], 
       COUNT([username]) as a 
 FROM [test] 
WHERE [timestamp] >= DATEADD(day,-7, GETDATE()) 
GROUP BY DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])) 
ORDER BY DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, [timestamp])) 

-- see how this groups into months
SELECT year = Year([timestamp]),
       month = Month([timestamp]),
       cnt = COUNT([username])
  FROM [test]
 GROUP BY Year([timestamp]), Month([timestamp])


-- use supra in Common Table Expression and use PIVOT to get required result
;WITH mysales (year, month, cnt)
   AS ( SELECT year = Year([timestamp]),
               month = Month([timestamp]),
               cnt = COUNT([username])
          FROM [test]
         GROUP BY Year([timestamp]), Month([timestamp]))

select * from mysales
pivot (SUM (cnt) for year in ([2014],[2013],[2012])) as year

PS: something to note might be that you might want to know the number of different customers that occur in the table (per GROUP BY). For that you should use COUNT(DISTINCT [username]).

For example, if you run SELECT COUNT(*), COUNT(object_id), COUNT(collation_name), COUNT(DISTINCT collation_name) FROM sys.columns

  • The first column will return the total number of records found.
  • The second column will return the total number of object_id's found; but as this field is non-NULLable it will as a result also return the total number of records.
  • The third column will return the total number of collation_names found; but as this field is NULLable, those records that have a NULL-value for this field are skipped so the number will be a lot lower.
  • The fourth column will return the number of different collation_names found, excluding the NULL's. (which is slightly different than what you would expect from SELECT DISTINCT collation_name FROM sys.columns
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.