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In cPython 2.4:

def f(a,b,c,d):
    pass

>>> f(b=1,c=1,d=1)
TypeError: f() takes exactly 4 non-keyword arguments (0 given)

but:

>>> f(a=1,b=1,c=1)
TypeError: f() takes exactly 4 non-keyword arguments (3 given)

Clearly, I don't really really understand Python's function-argument processing mechanism. Anyone care to share some light on this? I see what's happening (something like filling argument slots, then giving up), but I think this would foul up a newbie.

(also, if people have better question keywords -- something like "guts" -- please retag)

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Just out of curiosity, what were you expecting Python to do in the two examples you gave? –  Will McCutchen Feb 1 '10 at 22:19
    
I'd expect it to say 3 given to both. –  Gregg Lind Feb 1 '10 at 22:23

2 Answers 2

When you say

def f(a,b,c,d):

you are telling python that f takes 4 positional arguments. Every time you call f it must be given exactly 4 arguments, and the first value will be assigned to a, the second to b, etc.

You are allowed to call f with something like

f(1,2,3,4) or f(a=1,b=2,c=3,d=4), or even f(c=3,b=2,a=1,d=4)

but in all cases, exactly 4 arguments must be supplied.

f(b=1,c=1,d=1) returns an error because no value has been supplied for a. (0 given) f(a=1,b=1,c=1) returns an error because no value has been supplied for d. (3 given)

The number of args given indicates how far python got before realizing there is an error.

By the way, if you say

def f(a=1,b=2,c=3,d=4):

then your are telling python that f takes 4 optional arguments. If a certain arg is not given, then its default value is automatically supplied for you. Then you could get away with calling

f(a=1,b=1,c=1) or f(b=1,c=1,d=1)

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So, this is exactly the non-obvious part: The number of args given indicates how far python got before realizing there is an error. I'd file this under "wart that can bite novices", since in fact, 3 are given in both cases. –  Gregg Lind Feb 1 '10 at 22:24
    
At least you got an error ;) –  telliott99 Feb 2 '10 at 2:08
    
What about making a call wrapper that would catch such error and raise a more appropriate error? I've tried doing that but there's huge amount of little problematic details; has anyone else tried? (also, I wonder why it's not done in the default CPython) –  HoverHell Nov 21 '12 at 14:29

It is theoretically possible to wrap the resulting TypeError with something more clear and informative. However, there are many little details some of which I don't know how to solve.

NOTE: the code below is a barely-working example, not a complete solution.

try:
    fn(**data)
except TypeError as e:
    ## More-sane-than-default processing of a case `parameter ... was not specified`
    ## XXX: catch only top-level exceptions somehow?
    ##  * through traceback?
    if fn.func_code.co_flags & 0x04:  ## XXX: check
        # it accepts `*ar`, so not the case
        raise
    f_vars = fn.func_code.co_varnames
    f_defvars_count = len(fn.func_defaults)
    ## XXX: is there a better way?
    ##  * it catches `self` in a bound method as required. (also, classmethods?)
    ##  * `inspect.getargspec`? Imprecise, too (for positional args)
    ##  * also catches `**kwargs`.
    f_posvars = f_vars[:-f_defvars_count]
    extra_args = list(set(data.keys()) - set(f_vars))
    missing_args = list(set(f_posvars) - set(data.keys()))
    if missing_args:  # is the case, raise it verbosely.
        msg = "Required argument(s) not specified: %s" % (
          ', '.join(missing_args),)
        if extra_args:
            msg += "; additionally, there are extraneous arguments: %s" % (
              ', '.join(extra_args))
        raise TypeError(msg, e)
        #_log.error(msg)
        #raise
    raise
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