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I have to deal with a large quantity of try/except. I'm in doubt about the right way of doing it.

Option 1:

inst = Some(param1, param2)
try:
    is_valid = retry_func(partial(inst.some_other), max_retry=1)
except RetryException, e:
    SendMail.is_valid_problem(e)

if is_valid:
    print "continue to write your code"
    ...
    *** more code with try/except ***
    ...

Option 2:

inst = Some(param1, param2)
try:
    is_valid = retry_func(partial(inst.some_other), max_retry=1)
    if is_valid:
        print "continue to write your code"
        ...
        *** more code with try/except ***
        ...
except RetryException, e:
    SendMail.is_valid_problem(e)

In the Option 1, even is the exception is raised, "is_valid" will be tested and I don't need that.

In the Option 2, is what I think is correct but the code will look like a "callback hell".

What option should I choose or what option is the correct one?

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Option 1 is the way to go –  thefourtheye Feb 15 at 11:55

4 Answers 4

Keep your exception handling as close as possible to the code that raises the exception. You don't want to accidentally mask a different problem in code you thought would not raise the same exception.

There is a third option here, use the else: suite of the try statement:

inst = Some(param1, param2)
try:
    is_valid = retry_func(partial(inst.some_other), max_retry=1)
except RetryException, e:
    SendMail.is_valid_problem(e)
else: 
    if is_valid:
        print "continue to write your code"
        ...
        *** more code with try/except ***
        ...

The else: suite is only executed if there was no exception raised in the try suite.

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I think option 1 is better. The reason is that you should always put inside a try except only the code which you expect to throw the exception. Putting more code increase the risk of catching an unwanted exception.

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From your conditions, condition 1 is better and you can use else instead of if is_valid

Here are some of Try Except:

Here is simple syntax of try....except...else blocks:

  try:
     You do your operations here;
     ......................
  except ExceptionI:
     If there is ExceptionI, then execute this block.
  except ExceptionII:
     If there is ExceptionII, then execute this block.
     ......................
  else:
     If there is no exception then execute this block.

The except clause with multiple exceptions:

  try:
     You do your operations here;
     ......................
  except(Exception1[, Exception2[,...ExceptionN]]]):
     If there is any exception from the given exception list,
     then execute this block.
     ......................
  else:
     If there is no exception then execute this block.

The try-finally clause:

  try:
     You do your operations here;
     ......................
     Due to any exception, this may be skipped.
  finally:
     This would always be executed.
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Make sure that if an Error will occur, keep the cause inside the try statement. That way, it will catch the error and sort it out in the except section. There is also finally. If the try doesn't work, but the "except" error doesn't work, it will act out the "finally" statement. If there is no finally, the program will get stuck. This is a sample code with try and except: import sys import math while True: x=sys.stdin.readline() x=float(x) try: x=math.sqrt(x) y=int(x) if x!=y: print("Your number is not a square number.") elif x==y: print("Your number is a square number.") except(ValueError): print("Your number is negative.") ValueError is the error you get from sqrt-ing a negative number.

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