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I just realized that (thanks to my university course) many of the things I thought I knew about unicode were wrong. Thus I started reading and fixing my knowledges and the following doubts immediately arose by playing around with a simple "Hello world" C++ program in MSVC2012:

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
using namespace std;

int main(void) {

    char arr1[] = "I am a nice boy"; // Is this stored as UTF-8 (multi-byte) or ASCII?
    char arr[] = "I'm a nice èboi"; // All characters should be ASCII except the 'è' one, which encoding is used for this?
    cout << strlen(arr); // Returns 15 as ASCII, why?

    // If I choose "multi-byte character set" in my VS project configuration instead of "unicode", what does this mean and what
    // will this affect?

    char arr2[] = "I'm a niße boy"; // And what encoding is it used here?
    cout << strlen(arr2); // Returns 1514, what does this mean?

    // If UTF-32 usually use 4 bytes to encode a character (even if they're not needed), how can a unicode code point like U+FFFF
    // (FFFF hexadecimal is 65535 in decimal) represent any possible unicode character if the maximum is FFFF ? (http://inamidst.com/stuff/unidata/)

    return 0;
}

The above was compiled with "multi-byte character set" but since multi-byte is a type of unicode encoding I guess(?) even this is not clear.

Can someone please help me out with clear explanations for the above questions?

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What part of "I just realized that many of the things I thought I knew about unicode were wrong" you didn't understand? –  Marco A. Feb 15 at 13:30
    
This isn't about Unicode, it's about VS2012. If you don't understand whether you are using Unicode at all, there's no Unicode question at all. –  bmargulies Feb 15 at 13:31
    
Then edit the question and add the tag if you think so. –  Marco A. Feb 15 at 13:31
    
Mr. Kernin, I am not finding your tone polite. It's up to you to ask an answerable question. if you know whether your source file is in UTF-8 or some non-unicode code page, edit your question. If you don't, still edit your question, or better yet, find out and then edit your question. –  bmargulies Feb 15 at 13:33
    
I didn't find your tone polite in the first place. Let's both settle in please. Sorry if I wrote wrong things that's because I'm confused and not because I'm trying to make my point. I edited the question with the vs2012 tag and the properties I set –  Marco A. Feb 15 at 13:35
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
    char arr1[] = "I am a nice boy"; // Is this stored as UTF-8 (multi-byte) or ASCII?

This is stored in the compiler's execution charset. The compiler gets to choose what this is and should document it. GCC lets you set the execution encoding with the flag -fexec-charset=charset but I think uses UTF-8 by default, MSVC uses the machine's 'encoding for non-Unicode applications' configured in the system language settings (which can never be UTF-8), and clang uses UTF-8 unconditionally.

char arr[] = "I'm a nice èboi"; // All characters should be ASCII except the 'è' one, which encoding is used for this?
cout << strlen(arr); // Returns 15 as ASCII, why?

The compiler execution charset actually doesn't have to be ASCII compatible at all. For example it could be EBDIC.

strlen(arr) returns 15 because the string literal, encoded using the compiler execution charset, is 15 bytes long. Since the string literal is 15 characters long this probably means that the compiler execution charset used a single byte for each of those characters, including 'è'. (And since UTF-8 cannot encoded that string in only 15 bytes that conclusively indicates that your compiler is not using UTF-8 as the compiler execution charset.)

char arr2[] = "I'm a niße boy"; // And what encoding is it used here?
cout << strlen(arr2); // Returns 1514, what does this mean?

The encoding does not change based on the content of the string. The compiler will always use the execution charset. I'm assuming '1514' is a typo and strlen(arr2) in fact return 14, because there are 14 characters in that string and since the earlier string seemed to use one byte per character as well.

If I choose "multi-byte character set" in my VS project configuration instead of "unicode", what does this mean and what will this affect?

That setting has nothing to do with the encodings used by the compiler. It just sets macros in Microsoft's headers to different things. TCHAR, all the macros that choose between *W and *A functions, etc.

In fact it's entirely possible to write a program using multi-byte character strings when you enable 'unicode' and one can also use unicode when you enable 'multi-byte character set'.

If UTF-32 usually use 4 bytes to encode a character (even if they're not needed), how can a unicode code point like U+FFFF (FFFF hexadecimal is 65535 in decimal) represent any possible unicode character if the maximum is FFFF ? (http://inamidst.com/stuff/unidata/)

This question makes no sense. Perhaps if you rephrase...

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You answered to everything except last one which Remy correctly answered. I'm still awarding the points to you but putting +1 on his answer. Thanks! –  Marco A. Feb 18 at 18:05
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If UTF-32 usually use 4 bytes to encode a character (even if they're not needed), how can a unicode code point like U+FFFF (FFFF hexadecimal is 65535 in decimal) represent any possible unicode character if the maximum is FFFF ? (http://inamidst.com/stuff/unidata/)

Your source is out of date. Unicode was limited to a max codepoint of U+FFFF back in the early days when UCS-2 was the only Unicode encoding, but Unicode outgrew that limit years ago. UTFs (UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-32) were created to replace UCS-2 and extend the limit, which is currently codepoint U+10FFFF (the highest codepoint that UTF-16 can encode).

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Thanks! This is exactly what I meant –  Marco A. Feb 18 at 18:06
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char holds an 8-bit value in C++, regardless of everything else. So, those variables contain sequences of bytes. If they are in Unicode at all, which they might not be, then they are, thus, in UTF-8.

Accented characters in the Latin-1 set (such as è), have two representations in Unicode: composed and decomposed. The composed versions are a single character, the decomposed are two. You can look at resources such as http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/e8/index.htm; it would tell you that the character that you posted in your question is composed, and in UTF-8 it is 0xC3 0xA8 (c3a8) (two bytes).

It is also possible that you are compiling in the ACP for Latin1, not in Unicode at all, in which case all of these chars will be a single byte in length.

Your strlen of 1514 is incomprehensible to me; I want to wonder if char[] = "xxxx" does not initialize with a trailing zero, but I don't recall one way of the other. You could try changing those to char* instead and see you get a different answer.

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strlen of 1514 could be due to the fact that after the first ‘cout‘ call the OP doesn‘t put a newline so the real string length is just 14. –  Banex Feb 15 at 13:47
    
Banex has a point, silly me. Sorry.. thanks for the rest of the answer and excuse me if I've been rude at the beginning. –  Marco A. Feb 15 at 13:55
    
char is not guaranteed to be 8 bits –  David Heffernan Feb 18 at 8:06
    
It is on his compiler, no? –  bmargulies Feb 18 at 12:02
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