Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class hierarchy:

public class Row : ICloneable, IComparable, IEquatable<Row>,
    IStringIndexable, IDictionary<string, string>,
    ICollection<KeyValuePair<string, string>>,
    IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>>,
    System.Collections.IEnumerable
{ }

public class SpecificRow : Row, IXmlSerializable,
    System.Collections.IEnumerable
{
    public void Add(KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string> item) { }
}

However, trying to do the following gives an error:

var result = new SpecificRow
    {
        {MyEnum.Value, ""},
        {MyEnum.OtherValue, ""}
    };

I get this error:

The best overloaded Add method 'Row.Add(string, string)' for the collection initializer has some invalid arguments

How can I make it so that using an object initializer on the derived class SpecificRow allows type MyEnum? It seems like it should see the Add method in SpecificRow.

Update: I implemented an extra interface on SpecificRow so it now looks like this:

public class SpecificRow : Row, IXmlSerializable,
    System.Collections.IEnumerable,
    ICollection<KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>>
{ }

However, I still get the same Add error. I'm going to try implementing IDictionary<MyEnum, string> next.

share|improve this question
1  
@JonH: incorrect, the error message is stating that the "best overload" that could be found for the given call site is Add(string, string), and this doesn't match the arguments actually being passed in. –  Seth Petry-Johnson Feb 1 '10 at 21:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A collection initializer does not necessarily look at any ICollection.Add(x) method. More specifically, for a collection initializer

new SpecificRow {
    { ? }
}

C# looks at any Add method with signature Add(?); if ? contains comma's, C# looks at an Add method with multiple arguments. The compiler does not have any special handling of KeyValuePair<,> at all. The reason { string, string } works, is because your base class has an overload Add(string, string), and not because it has an overload for Add(KeyValuePair<string, string>).

So to support your syntax for

new SpecificRow {
    { MyEnum.Value, "" }
};

you need an overload of the form

void Add(MyEnum key, string value)

That's all there is to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I'm so tickled not to have to implement an entire interface just to get object initializer capabilities. Adding your suggested overload to SpecificRow worked. –  Sarah Vessels Feb 1 '10 at 21:28

It looks like it's because you're only implementing IDictionary<string, string>, and all the other interfaces associated with it. Your Add(KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>) method isn't implementing any interface member, it's just another member of the SpecificRow class, which happens to be named Add, which is why it is getting ignored.

You should be able to do one of the following, depending on what your requirements are:

  1. Implement IDictionary<MyEnum, string> in addition to IDictionary<MyEnum, string>, including the dependent interfaces (ICollection<KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>>, etc).
  2. Implement IDictionary<MyEnum, string> instead of IDictionary<MyEnum, string>, again including the dependent interfaces.
  3. Change the declaration of Row to Row<T>, and implement IDictionary<T, string>, including the dependent interfaces. SpecificRow would then implement Row<MyEnum> instead of just Row.
share|improve this answer
1  
Well a lot of them would be implicitly implemented... IIRC, IDictionary<TKey, TValue> requires ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>, IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>` and IEnumerable. For the rest of them, there are plenty of scenarios where implementing all of those interfaces would be reasonable, acceptable, and likely even desirable. –  Daniel Schaffer Feb 1 '10 at 21:14
1  
I'm not sure if this is correct. Section 7.5.10.3 of the C# language specification states that collections must only implement IEnumerable to be initialized this way, and "...for each specified element in order, the collection initializer invokes an Add method on the target object... applying normal overload resolution for each invocation". In other words, if the collection has an Add() method that matches KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>, I'd expect it to be called, just like the original poster. –  Seth Petry-Johnson Feb 1 '10 at 21:14
1  
What section 7.5.10.3 means, is that { x, y } will translate to a method call Add(x, y). C# has no special support for KeyValuePair<,>, but rather the IDictionary<,>.Add(key, value) method is called, not IDictionary<,>.Add(KeyValuePair<,> pair) –  Ruben Feb 1 '10 at 21:22
1  
@Daniel: I understand what you're saying, but my understanding of collection initializers is that each element in the list specifies a set of arguments to pass to an Add() method of the collection type being initialized. Since she's explicitly constructing a SpecificRow, I would expect the overload resolution to say "what overload of SpecificRow.Add() accepts a KVP<enum, string>", and then resolve to the correct method. Collection initializers only require the initialized class implement the non-generic IEnumerable, why should she have to implement a generic interface? –  Seth Petry-Johnson Feb 1 '10 at 21:26
1  
@Seth: right. the whole IEnumerable/ICollection/IDictionary stuff is throwing you off. The only thing you need is an Add method with the right number (and type) of arguments, and in this case, and Add with two arguments. –  Ruben Feb 1 '10 at 21:31

Ruben's answer is definitely the best, but if you didn't want to add Add(MyEnum key, string value) then you could also initialize the collection like so:

var result = new SpecificRow
{
    new KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>(MyEnum.Value, ""}),
    new KeyValuePair<MyEnum, string>(MyEnum.OtherValue, ""})
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.