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I'm writing a program that asks the user to enter their name, weight, and planet to find out what their weight would be on the given planet. The program works fine, except it skips over the name input the second time. I need some suggestions on how to fix this.

#include<iostream>
#include<iomanip>
#include<string>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
//declare variables and arrays
string planets[8] = {"mercury", "venus", "earth", "mars", "jupiter", "saturn", "uranus", "neptune"};
double gravities[8] = {0.37, 0.78, 1.00, 0.38, 2.64, 1.16, 1.07, 1.21};
double weight = 0.0;
string planetChoice = " ";
string name = " ";

//give the user information and instructions
cout << "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Find your weight on different planets!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~" << endl;
cout << "This program calculates what your weight would be on various planets in " << endl;
cout << "our solar system. To use this program, enter your full name, weight, and the " << endl;
cout << "planet when prompted." << endl;
cout << endl;
cout << "Choice of planets:" << endl;
cout << "Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter," << endl;
cout << "Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune" << endl;
cout << endl;


cout << "Full name (first and last) (\"exit\" to stop): ";
getline (cin, name);

while (name != "exit")
{
    cout << "Enter your weight: ";
    cin >> weight;

    cout << "Choose your planet: ";
    cin >> planetChoice;
    transform(planetChoice.begin(), planetChoice.end(), planetChoice.begin(), tolower);

    for (int x = 0; x < 8; x++)
    {
        if (planetChoice == planets[x])
        {
            weight = weight * gravities[x];
            switch(x)
            {
                case 0:
                    cout << name << ", Your weight on the plannet closest to the sun (Mercury) would be: " << weight << "You'd be light as a feather!" <<endl;
                    break;
                case 1:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on Venus would be: " << weight << "You'd be a bit lighter!" << endl;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on your home planet (Earth) is: " << weight << endl;
                    break;
                case 3:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on the red planet (Mars) would be: " << weight << endl;
                    break;
                case 4:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on the largest planet (Jupiter) would be: " << weight << endl;
                    break;
                case 5:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on the planet with rings (Saturn) would be: " << weight << endl;
                    break;
                case 6:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on The Bull's Eye Planet (Uranus) would be: " << weight << "Your weight would be close to normal" << endl;
                    break;
                case 7:
                    cout << name << ", your weight on the ice cold planet of Neptune would be: " << weight << endl;
                    break;
                default:
                    cout << "Invalid planet name" << endl;
                    break;
            }//end switch
        }//end if
    }//end for  
    cout << "Full name (first and last) (\"exit\" to stop): ";
    getline (cin, name);
}//end while

system("pause");
return 0;
}//end of main function
share|improve this question
    
put ignore() after every cin>>. –  Paweł Stawarz Feb 16 '14 at 1:57
    
+1 because this is an awesome idea –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 16 '14 at 1:59
    
@PawełStawarz It is not necessary after every cin>>. Reading from stream using stream semantics is insensitive on possible white characters. cin.ignore() is required only before second getline() (inside the while() loop). –  Mateusz Grzejek Feb 16 '14 at 2:17
    
@MateuszGrzejek using ignore() after using operator>> is considered good practice when you mix it with getline. The structure of the app can always change, and if it does - you'll be prepared. It's a thing of choice, but it can certainly help novice programmers. –  Paweł Stawarz Feb 16 '14 at 2:26

1 Answer 1

It skips querying for name, because the input stream is not empty at the end of while() loop. After entering the name, you 'accept' it by pressing Enter, which send new line character ('\n') to input stream. This character marks end of input, but it's not fetched from there, that is, it stays in stream and waits for being taken from there.

All you need to do, is add cin.ignore() before second getline():

cout << "Full name (first and last) (\"exit\" to stop): ";
getline (cin, name);

while (name != "exit")
{
    cout << "Enter your weight: ";
    cin >> weight;

    cout << "Choose your planet: ";
    cin >> planetChoice;

    transform(planetChoice.begin(), planetChoice.end(), planetChoice.begin(), tolower);

    for (int x = 0; x < 8; x++)
    {
    //...
    }

    cin.ignore(); //Discard newline character.
    cout << "Full name (first and last) (\"exit\" to stop): ";
    getline (cin, name);
}
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