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I have some data with a timestamp in SQL Server, I would like to store that value in sqlce with out getting fancy to compare the two values.

What is the SQL Server timestamp equivalent in sqlce?

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Please use "SQL Server" and not "ms sql". It makes it much easier for others to search. –  John Saunders Feb 1 '10 at 23:02
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Have you tried using timestamp? What happens? –  John Saunders Feb 1 '10 at 23:03
    
timestamp is no good. I need to copy the existing timestamp from the sql server db to the sqlce db. –  NitroxDM Mar 10 '10 at 22:55
    
timestamp is a read only autogen.... –  NitroxDM Mar 10 '10 at 22:57

3 Answers 3

Timestamp is from MS Docs

timestamp is a data type that exposes automatically generated binary numbers, which are guaranteed to be unique within a database. timestamp is used typically as a mechanism for version-stamping table rows. The storage size is 8 bytes.

This value makes no sense outside the database it was created in. Thus I don't see how it can be converted.

In a non Sybase/ SQL Server database I would use a version number or last updated column

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AS of Sql Compact 3.5, there is support for timestamps, per MSDN:

SQL Server Compact implements the timestamp (rowversion) data type. The rowversion is a data type that exposes automatically generated binary numbers, which are guaranteed to be unique in a database. It is used typically as a mechanism for version-stamping table rows.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok the timestamp is a varbinary that auto generates. So to copy a time stamp you need a varbinary field.

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Or cast it to a BIGINT since it is an 8 byte value. –  Ryan Kirkman Aug 20 '12 at 5:44

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