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As mentioned in PythonCookbook, * can be added before a tuple, and what does * mean here?

Chapter 1.18. Mapping Names to Sequence Elements:

from collections import namedtuple
Stock = namedtuple('Stock', ['name', 'shares', 'price'])
s = Stock(*rec) 
# here rec is an ordinary tuple, for example: rec = ('ACME', 100, 123.45)

In the same section, **dict presents:

from collections import namedtuple
Stock = namedtuple('Stock', ['name', 'shares', 'price', 'date', 'time'])
# Create a prototype instance
stock_prototype = Stock('', 0, 0.0, None, None)
# Function to convert a dictionary to a Stock
def dict_to_stock(s):
    return stock_prototype._replace(**s)

What is **'s function here?

==========================================
update: I mistook **dict as **tuple, now it's fixed.

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, falsetru, Jonas Wielicki, Ashwini Chaudhary, Elazar Feb 16 at 9:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Please read Python tutorial. (Unpacking Argument Lists) –  falsetru Feb 16 at 8:51
1  
And it's not **tuple but **dictionary. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 16 at 8:53
    
@MartijnPieters SORRY for that, I will try to fix it. –  heLomaN Feb 16 at 9:05
    
No problem, just pointing to a misunderstanding on your part. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 16 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Function call

*tuple means "treat this tuple as positional arguments to this function call."

def foo(x, y):
    print(x, y)

>>> t = (1,2)
>>> foo(*t)
1 2

**dict means "treat the key-value pairs in the dictionary as additional named arguments to this function call."

def foo(x, y):
    print(x, y)

>>> d = {'x':1, 'y':2}
>>> foo(**d)
1 2

Function signature

*tuple means "take all additional positional aruments to this function and pack them into this parameter as a tuple."

def foo(*x):
    print(x)

>>> foo(1,2)
(1,2)

**dict means "take all additional named arguments to this function and insert them into this parameter as dictionary entries."

def foo(**d):
    print(d)

>>> foo(x=1, y=2)
{'y': 2, 'x': 1}
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1  
You forgot a * there on the **dict syntax. And there is context missing; function call or function signature? –  Martijn Pieters Feb 16 at 8:56
    
@MartijnPieters thanks. Is it better now? –  Elazar Feb 16 at 8:59
1  
Yup, see the linked duplicate questions. :-D –  Martijn Pieters Feb 16 at 9:03

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