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Sample data:

data1 <-    data.frame(id=c(rep(1,4),rep(2,3),rep(3,5)),var1=rnorm(12,2,2),var2=rnorm(12,0,1))
data2 <- data.frame(id=c(rep(1,4),rep(2,3),rep(3,5)),Year=c(c(2009:2012),c(2011:2013),c(2010:2014)))

To merge these two dataframes by id I have tried:

merge(data1,data2,by="id")

However I'm getting too many entries (in this case 50 instead of 12). What I'm doing wrong? I read ?merge throughout but could not find solution to this.

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Perhaps, in this case, just a cbind(data1, data2$Year) works? –  alexis_laz Feb 16 at 12:50
    
No. I'm getting "arguments imply differing number of rows", with the real data. –  Max Feb 16 at 12:51
    
merge(data1, data2) will work. You would only get 12 observations if the id field is unique for all 12 in both data sets –  rawr Feb 16 at 13:25
    
Have you even tried with the above example? Same result 50 obs. –  Max Feb 16 at 13:29
    
with all due respect, I think R is smart than you, so I trust it. Let's see why you get 50: you have data1 with 12 unique rows, with three unique IDs each having a unique row itself. In data2 you have x number of unique years for x number of IDs. Doing some simple math: 4*4 + 3*3 + 5*5 = 50, that is, there are four unique rows for ID = 1 in data1 as well as four unique years in data2, so 4 * 4 possible combinations for ID = 1 and so on and so forth. You get 50 in total. I am not sure what you were expecting to happen –  rawr Feb 16 at 14:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you want to match every occurrence of an ID value to the corresponding one in the other data frame (i.e. first 1 in data1 to first 1 in data2), this should work:

data1$sub.id <- ave(data1$id, data1$id, FUN=seq_along)
data2$sub.id <- ave(data2$id, data2$id, FUN=seq_along)
merge(data1, data2)

This creates a new column sub.id which allows a 1:1 join with across the tables to avoid the duplication of rows. Note sub.id in the result:

#    id sub.id       var1        var2 Year
# 1   1      1  2.7798041  0.39005994 2009
# 2   1      2  0.7795420 -0.02080376 2010
# 3   1      3  1.2909722  1.31755625 2011
# 4   1      4 -0.9922580 -2.62795306 2012
# 5   2      1  0.5809296  0.16806834 2011
# 6   2      2  1.8114151  0.02796051 2012
# 7   2      3  2.3535121  0.76735688 2013
# 8   3      1  1.5777147  1.01872354 2010
# 9   3      2  1.6185523  0.03373418 2011
# 10  3      3  3.4204143  0.49242310 2012
# 11  3      4  3.0284096 -0.87107179 2013
# 12  3      5 -0.1807360  0.55000410 2014

It is of course trivial to remove that column from the result if it is undesirable.

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the two data sets have different number of rows that's why he gets the error with actual data –  rawr Feb 16 at 13:53
    
@rawr, didn't see first comment –  BrodieG Feb 16 at 14:05
    
@rawr, updated. –  BrodieG Feb 16 at 14:11

Using the sqldf package is also a great alternative.

given:

data1 <-    data.frame(id=c(rep(1,4),rep(2,3),rep(3,5)),var1=rnorm(12,2,2),var2=rnorm(12,0,1))
data2 <- data.frame(id=c(rep(1,4),rep(2,3),rep(3,5)),Year=c(c(2009:2012),c(2011:2013),c(2010:2014)))

data3 <- sqldf('select * from data1 left join data2 using (id)')

The sql join statement results in a data.frame that is 4 columns and 50 rows

data3 <- structure(list(id = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3), var1 = c(2.61716209865221,2.61716209865221, 2.61716209865221, 2.61716209865221, 2.20198996343026,2.20198996343026, 2.20198996343026, -0.278936662712637, -0.278936662712637,-0.278936662712637), var2 = c(-1.1426769785424, -1.1426769785424,-1.1426769785424, -1.1426769785424, 0.731746863311001, 0.731746863311001,0.731746863311001, -1.90887002181195, -1.90887002181195, -1.90887002181195), Year = c(2009L, 2010L, 2011L, 2012L, 2009L, 2010L, 2011L,2012L, 2013L, 2014L)), .Names = c("id", "var1", "var2", "Year"), row.names = c(1L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 48L, 49L, 50L), class = "data.frame")

This will match all rows of data2 by the id column to data1. The * operator selects all the columns from data1 and data2. The number of rows of data1 and data2 do not need to match.

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