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When I asked this question I got almost always a definite yes you should have coding standards.

What was the strangest coding standard rule that you were ever forced to follow?

And by strangest I mean funniest, or worst, or just plain odd.

In each answer, please mention which language, what your team size was, and which ill effects it caused you and your team.

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19  
After reading thru this list suddenly I feel like I've had a very lucky career to avoid any of this forced standard crap! –  matt b Oct 20 '08 at 17:15
5  
And I'm embarrassed to admit that very early in my career, I imposed one of the answers on a team. I'm so sorry, guys. –  JasonFruit Mar 1 '10 at 16:09

112 Answers 112

up vote 435 down vote accepted

I hate it when the use of multiple returns is banned.

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26  
What is the supposed point of this rule? Personally I'd fail a code review for code that could be made easier to read by putting in another return. –  Mark Baker Oct 20 '08 at 15:31
22  
On the other hand, eliminating an option at the beginning like "if(param == null) return null" can clean up your code quite a bit, to prohibit this instead of encourage it is somewhat criminal. –  Bill K Oct 20 '08 at 16:17
39  
Workaround: if (!Initialize()) { RetVal=ERR_BADINIT; goto ReturnPoint; } (lots more code) ReturnPoint: return RetVal; } Problem solved! ;) –  Marc Bernier Oct 20 '08 at 16:38
9  
Up until recently, multiple returns were banned. Then the fact this was a leftover from C, rendered obsolete by C++ RAII and functions with size less than 15 lines, was revealed. Since then, like Braveheart: "FREEDOM !!!!" ... :-p ... –  paercebal Oct 20 '08 at 21:13
122  
Your choice: multiple returns or more nested if statements. I'll take multiple returns. –  Lance Fisher Dec 17 '08 at 9:19

Maybe not the most outlandish one you'll get, but I really really hate when I have to preface database table names with 'tbl'

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5  
Isn't this just hungarian notation for DB's? –  ARKBAN Oct 20 '08 at 12:13
19  
Isn't that like prefixing variables with var? –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 20 '08 at 12:13
26  
In a similar vein, I hate when ID columns in databases are prefixed with the table name, like in the product table there'd be a productid column. Redundancy that sometimes makes scripting without an ORM more of a headache than it needs to be –  Andrew Ingram Oct 20 '08 at 17:27
30  
I actually prefer the ID column to be prefixed with the table name. Makes writing queries a bit easier. And for foreign keys you can have the foreign key field the same as the key field. –  Craig Oct 20 '08 at 23:24
38  
On a similar note, I hate it when table names must be singular. My instinct is to name a table that holds, say, customers, "Customers", not "Customer". Sounds minor, till you realize all the trouble you would save if only you could name your table "Transactions" instead of "[Transaction]". –  Atario Nov 17 '08 at 19:49

Almost any kind of hungarian notation.

The problem with hungarian notation is that it is very often misunderstood. The original idea was to prefix the variable so that the meaning was clear. For example:

int appCount = 0; // Number of apples.
int pearCount = 0; // Number of pears.

But most people use it to determine the type.

int iAppleCount = 0; // Number of apples.
int iPearCount = 0;  // Number of pears.

This is confusing, because although both numbers are integers, everybody knows, you can't compare apples with pears.

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71  
See this Joel on Software post about how proper use of Hungarian notation can help reduce bugs: joelonsoftware.com/articles/Wrong.html –  flicken Oct 20 '08 at 15:48
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Of course by using C++ instead of C you can write code so that the compiler gives you an error when comparing apples to pears. –  Andreas Magnusson Nov 5 '08 at 13:02
5  
Yes, Joel got it right. I wish compilers could be made to enforce Joel's version of it. –  Loren Pechtel Nov 16 '08 at 6:00
9  
Shouldn't that be "int cntApples = 0; int cntPeas = 0;"? Ie. The prefix is the variable "kind". –  Blorgbeard Feb 13 '09 at 2:04
42  
At least the first one is correct ... everything with "Apple" in it needs to be prefixed with "i". ;) –  Johannes Charra Dec 10 '09 at 10:12

Hungarian notation in general.

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11  
Well, I like H/N for control on a page. It's much easier to find all the textbox controls in an IntelliSense dropdown when all I have to look for is txtFooBar. –  cciotti Oct 20 '08 at 17:21
20  
HUngarian notation is not evil, just need to be used properly joelonsoftware.com/articles/Wrong.html –  Czimi Nov 1 '08 at 19:14
1  
I will concede with respect to controls. Then Hungarian notation can be helpful. In general though, I think Hungarian notation is obsolete, and generally misused. It has drifted from it's original intention. –  vfilby Nov 6 '08 at 15:34
9  
Horribly misused, yes. Wrong, no. –  Loren Pechtel Nov 16 '08 at 6:10
2  
A lot of people start an interface name with an I, IEnumerable, IList... In .Net framework al the interfaces start with an I. –  tuinstoel Mar 15 '09 at 13:24

Use _ or m_ in front of global variable when you can simply use the keyword this. when you need to access global variable...

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2  
This is part of "How to write unmaintainable code" -- you can use m_ for module, member, and method. –  ARKBAN Oct 20 '08 at 12:16
7  
I've grown fond of _varName for private class variables, VarName for accessors, and varName for function parameters and local variables. It gives me a quick visual identifier as to scope. –  Benjamin Autin Oct 20 '08 at 16:03
1  
+1. Great arguments, guys! Where were you when I asked precisely that question ? ;-) stackoverflow.com/questions/132777/… –  VonC Oct 22 '08 at 13:47

Anything having to do with formatting (especially place of '{' and other block character) is always a pain to enforce.

Even with an automatic format at each source file checking, you can not be sure every developer will ever always use the same formatter, with the same formatting set of rules...

And then you have to merge those files back to trunk. And you commit suicide ;)

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In Delphi we had to change from

if something then
begin
  ...
end
else
begin
 ...
end;

to

if something then begin
  ...
end else begin
 ...
end;

in a project with 1.5 million lines of code. Imagine how easy this was on source control, diff, and merge! It also led to forgetting begin and not noticing it right away when the compiler announced a superflous end.

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Not being able to use Reflection as the manager claimed it involved too much 'magic'.

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10  
Yeah, magic is hard to maintain, appearantly ;) LOL, though. –  Rik Oct 20 '08 at 12:17
19  
That's probably the right rule, for the wrong reasons :) –  Bobby Jack Oct 20 '08 at 16:09
71  
for 'magic' read performance killing unmaintainable obscure nightmare code. He's right. –  gbjbaanb Oct 20 '08 at 17:04
4  
I guess you weren't allowed to code in .Net at all then. After all, a lot of how the framework executes is through reflection. –  NotMe Oct 21 '08 at 13:58
5  
Down with those wizards!! Always around, with their magic, stealing our jobs, seducing our women and corrupting our childrens! –  ZJR Jan 19 '10 at 14:41

The strangest one i saw was database table naming where the tables were prefaced with a TLA for functional area, eg accounting ACC then a 3 digit number to (overide the default sort) and then the table name.

Plus this was extended into the column names as well.

ACC100_AccountCode

it was a nightmare to read a query, they were so unreadable.

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1  
Schemas fixed all that crap. –  NotMe Oct 21 '08 at 13:58

Back in the 80's/90's, I worked for an aircraft simulator company that used FORTRAN. Our FORTRAN compiler had a limit of 8 characters for variable names. The company's coding standards reserved the first three of them for Hungarian-notation style info. So we had to try and create meaningful variable names with just 5 characters!

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17  
Luxury: we had just 6 characters; the package had names starting with g; the internal functions all started gk; there were workstation drivers with codes such as 0p (so gk0p was the start), leaving us two characters for the rest of the Fortran name. gk0paa, gk0pab, ... –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 21 '08 at 3:02
103  
"When I was your age, we only had 2 characters! And it was case-insensitive!" –  pookleblinky Oct 21 '08 at 6:45
53  
We used to have to get up at 2 in the morning, 3 hours before going to bed, then write our own compilers and pay the company for the privilege of going to work. We were allowed just the letter A for our variable names. Then our boss would delete our code and dance on our listings singing hallelujah. –  David Arno Oct 21 '08 at 7:02
12  
"50 possible identifiers ought to be enough for anyone" :p –  Chris Vest Oct 22 '08 at 13:26
5  
Heck, the BASIC interpreters we worked with a long time ago had two-character variable names. Why complain about 5? –  David Thornley Nov 16 '09 at 22:55

It was a coding standard I did not follow myself ( got in trouble for other things, but never that ). We had three 19" monitors, so we could have two editors open to full screen and still have access to the desktop. Everyone else did not use comments, but used meaningful names. Extremely long meaningful names. The longest I remember was in the 80 character range. The average was around 40~50.

Guess what, they didn't accurately describe the whole thing.

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7  
for(int ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime = 0; ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime < 10; ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime++) ; –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 20 '08 at 12:01
25  
ITYM: for(int ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime = 0; ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime < 10; ThisIsAnIterativeVariableWhichWeWillIncreaseBy1EachTime+=2); –  soru Aug 31 '09 at 14:25

You must use only five letter table names and the last two character is reserved for IO.

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Once worked on a project where underscores were banned. And I mean totally banned. So in a c# winforms app, whenever we added a new event handler (e.g. for a button) we'd have to rename the default method name from buttonName_Click() to something else, just to satisfy the ego of the guy that wrote the coding standards. To this day I don't know what he had against the humble underscore

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23  
Maybe _ was broken on his keyboard ;) –  Roman Plášil Oct 20 '08 at 15:01
139  
buttonNameUnderscoreClick() –  vitule Oct 20 '08 at 18:22
9  
Has the unfortunate side-effect of preventing the use of FILE and LINE for debugging. And #if __cplusplus extern "C" in header files. And the integral types in stdint.h. And size_t. –  Steve Jessop Oct 22 '08 at 2:06
8  
Good thing this was C# then –  configurator Apr 29 '09 at 14:48
4  
I seriously discourage underscores (although not in the OP case listed above. It's an extra two keystrokes (shift + _) that I prefer not to have put upon me when pascal or camel case will do just fine. –  TGnat Jun 29 '09 at 19:37

The strangest was that type qualified variable naming must be used in Java, and the types where those of the columns from the database. So a java.sql.ResultSet had to be called tblClient etc.

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No ternary operator allowed where I currently work:

int value = (a < b) ? a : b;

... because not everyone "gets it". If you told me, "Don't use it because we've had to rewrite them when the structures get too complicated" (nested ternary operators, anyone?), then I'd understand. But when you tell me that some developers don't understand them... um... Sure.

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235  
By everyone, your boss means himself. –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 20 '08 at 12:08
13  
I used to fall into this camp ... But grew out of it, and have learned to love the conditional operator (when it's appropriate). –  John Rudy Oct 20 '08 at 13:14
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If anything, the rule should be "always use the ternary operator", an operator of pure beauty :) –  Bobby Jack Oct 20 '08 at 16:13
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I love it, but the reason I get most often for not using is is the same as your experience "people wont understand it". My argument is that they shouldn't be working if they can't understand the concept... –  Aidos Oct 21 '08 at 3:28
7  
How else would you conditionally initialize a constant variable without writing a whole new function (which won't do much good for readability). The use of const for local "variables" does much more good for understanding and following the code than a ban of the ternary operator. –  Andreas Magnusson Nov 5 '08 at 13:06

Applying s_ to variables and methods which were deemed "safety critical" for software that was part of a control system. Couple this with the other rule about putting m_ on the front of member variables and you'd get something ridiculous like "s_m_blah()", which is darn annoying to write and not very readable in my opinion. In the end some 'safety expert' was supposed to gain insight by looking at the code and determining something from it by using those "s_" - in practice, they didn't know c++ too well so they couldn't do much other than make reports on the number of identifiers that we'd marked as 'safety critical'. Utter nonsense...

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3  
I've just spent the last five minutes trying to think of a joke about S & M. I'm sure there must be one. Probably not suitable to post here though. –  Mark Baker Oct 20 '08 at 15:39
1  
@Brian: I thought that was because they added those _s functions later... had the functions been safe in the first place, they wouldn't have needed a variant. –  Mark Jun 14 '10 at 5:01

We have a no code past the 80th character column that is controversial in our C++ development team. Liked and code review enforced by some; Despised by others.

Also, we have a very controversial C++ throw(), throw(...) specification standard. Religiously used by some and demonized by others. Both camps cite discussions and experts to enforce their respective positions.

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1  
+1 for two windows side by side :) I tend to have two consoles stacked on the left and my editor to the right. –  Chris Vest Oct 22 '08 at 13:54
1  
an 80 char limit is sensible, but there are times when it should be broken. Not very many, though. –  Wayne Werner Aug 20 '10 at 14:22

Doing all database queries via stored procedures in Sql Server 2000. From complex multi-table queries to simple ones like:

select id, name from people

The arguments in favor of procedures were:

  • Performance
  • Security
  • Maintainability

I know that the procedure topic is quite controversial, so feel free to score my answer negatively ;)

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2  
Maintainability could be improved if the table and column names are not unique, but the SP names are. This could make code references easier to find. If there are any other, better maintainability advantages, I am not aware of them. Security is the main reason to use SPs. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 20 '08 at 15:17
2  
I agree that for general purposes it's not 100% wtf, but see this link: codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000292.html –  azkotoki Oct 20 '08 at 15:41
2  
"Security is the main reason to use SPs" No. Nothing about SP's in SQL Server are more secure. They are only secure when called as a paremeterized queries, which can be done just as well with dynamic SQL. –  Flory Oct 20 '08 at 17:31
4  
Nah: sprocs are useful. While it can be a pain at times, you end up writing a better, more reusable database interface. Your dba's can also have an easier time analyzing performance problems and can update a production system without an app code change. I don't advocate biz logic in sprocs though. –  Robert Paulson Nov 24 '08 at 0:37
4  
burying queries in compiled code is such a pain, I'm 100% behind 100% sprocs policy for the abstraction alone –  annakata Dec 16 '08 at 14:42

If I remember correctly the delphi IDE did a default indent of two spaces. Most of the legacy code for the company had three spaces and was written by the VP IT and the CEO. One day, all the programmers were talking about what we should do to make our lives easier and a contractor who knew Delphi pretty well said, "Hey the ide defaults to two spaces does anyone have a problem with us doing this going forward for new code?" All of us looked at each other, and pretty much thought it was a no brainer and said that we agreed.

Two days later the VP and CEO found out we were going to make such a dangerous change that could "cause problems" and instructed us that we would be using three indents for everything until the two of them could accurately evaluate the impact of such a change. Now I am all for following standards, but these are the same people who thought oo programming was creating an object with one function that had all of the logic necessary to perform an action, and that source control was moving the code files to a different directory.

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I worked at a place that had a merger between 2 companies. The 'dominant' one had a major server written in K&R C (i.e. pre-ANSI). They forced the Java teams (from both offices -- probably 20 devs total) to use this format, which gleefully ignored the 2 pillars of the "brace debate" and goes straight to crazy:

if ( x == y ) 
    {
    System.out.println("this is painful");
    x = 0;
    y++;
    }
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18  
I would think that maintaining a greater visual distinction between C and Java would make the transitions easier. (+1 for "and goes straight to crazy.") –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Oct 20 '08 at 15:03
4  
Looks like Whitesmiths style which was used in the original 'Programming Windows' by Petzold - go figure! ;) –  Bobby Jack Oct 20 '08 at 16:12
7  
I find this the most intelligent brace style. Unfortunately, most people don't use it. If braces have semantic meaning, they should be treated like it, not stuck at the end of a line and ignored. –  Kyralessa Oct 24 '08 at 15:56
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@Kyralessa. I disagree... I don't know if braces have semantic meaning but they can certainly affect pattern-matching and a sense of space. IMO, this version loses that completely. e.g. I want my bookmark to poke outside the book, not be flush with the pages. –  Michael Easter Oct 24 '08 at 23:57
6  
This is actually my preferred style, but everything in the world (Visual Studio especially) defaults to other modes, so I've given up. Why do I like it? The braces are "part of" the contained code -- they force it to "look like" a single statement to the if, which is what it expects. –  Atario Nov 17 '08 at 19:33

I worked in a place where the coding standard was one giant WTF: strange Hungarian notation, prefixing globals with 'g' and members with 'm' (so there were gems like gsSomeVariable), adding 'ref string sError' to every single function, instead of throwing exceptions (which was a BIG nono!).

The killer, though, was prefixing the function parameters with I_ for input parameters, and O_ for output parameters.

I work now in a much better place :)

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3  
Prefixing globals with 'g' is simpler than putting a "here be dragons" comment on every fucntion. –  Martin Beckett Oct 20 '08 at 21:12
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don't know your platform, but this kind of stuff is typical VB6. Probably, if you're not in VB6, the person who made the rules comes from that background and wanted it to conform to what he's used to. It was wrong in vb6 too, but you know... –  Troy Howard Dec 5 '08 at 22:25
2  
I really like the g, and m prefixes... I and O seem a bit weird... –  Brian Postow Feb 13 '09 at 15:44
3  
g_ for globals, p_ for parameters, l_ for local variables, cp_ for cursor paramaters ... I used that in PL/SQL programming. I don't think that's bad. –  tuinstoel Mar 15 '09 at 13:38
2  
I argue that g and m are good prefix because: Globals::variableName is annoying to type (and NEVER EVER use the C++ global scope) and this->variableName is also worse to type (compare this->okButton with mOkButton in a member function. Which is easier to type?) –  CMircea Apr 15 '10 at 20:15

There must be 165 unit tests (not necessarily automated) per 1000 lines of code. That works out at one test for roughly every 8 lines.

Needless to say, some of the lines of code are quite long, and functions return this pointers to allow chaining.

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1  
What happens if you have 164? 166? –  Daniel Daranas Feb 13 '09 at 13:10
8  
More like 6 lines. –  recursive Feb 21 '09 at 23:36
1  
It depends on how finely grained your tests are too I guess. I'd consider function(x).should == 2 to be a single test, whereas others would bundle 10 of those together and call it a single test. –  Orion Edwards Jun 22 '10 at 3:06

A buddy of mine encountered this rule while working at a government job. The use of ++ (pre or post) was completely banned. The reason: Different compilers might interpret it differently.

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Well, at that point you might as well give up, right? –  Kirk Strauser Oct 20 '08 at 13:56
90  
Some one got bitten by not understanding the difference between postfix and prefix, claimed compiler bug, then inflicted it on other people, me thinks. –  Bernard Oct 22 '08 at 13:26
5  
Actually, they were right, in some circumstances. Banning seems a bit over the top though. Take for example, the line : a[i] = i++; i may get incremented before it is used to index a, or after. The language does not define this. –  T.E.D. Oct 23 '08 at 18:31
9  
He's right--the order of operations is not guaranteed when you use the same variable elsewhere in the statement. Just ban potentially ambiguous code, not all uses of it, though! –  Loren Pechtel Nov 16 '08 at 6:05
2  
Might as well ban = as it can be used to cause undefined behaviour. –  configurator Sep 15 '10 at 13:10

All file names must be in lower case...

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11  
That's not unreasonable if the code is supposed to be cross-platform and any of the targets is case-sensitive. It's easier to pick a case and stick with it, and at least THEY DIDN'T PICK ALL CAPS. –  Kirk Strauser Oct 20 '08 at 13:58
2  
I agree with Just Some Guy. And here's another such standard I like: NO spaces in file or directory names! (If you must, substitute the underscore or period...) –  Richard T Oct 20 '08 at 15:46
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It is unreasonable if you are coding Java and the filename has to match the class name. –  Dan Dyer Oct 20 '08 at 18:14
2  
OK, that's a pretty reasonable case for overriding the rule. –  Kirk Strauser Oct 21 '08 at 15:26

We have to put a comment above every sql statement. So, you may have an sql statement as such

Select USER_ID FROM USERS WHERE NAME = :NAME;

And you still have to have a comment above it that would say:

Select USER_ID from the USERS table, where name equals the name entered.

Now, when the actual comment is longer than the code, and the code is simple enough for a second grader to read, i really don't see the point of commenting... But, alas, I have had to go back and add comments to statements just like this.

This has been on a mainframe, coding in cobol. Team size is usually about 4 or 5, but this rule has bitten everyone here from time to time.

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1  
Well... It's the COBOL that's your problem! The designers of COBOL had a mindset that EVERYTHING had to be spelled out in what one may call "longest notation possible." ...I LITERALLY "threw the book away" when I read that to express subtraction I had to type the word SUBTRACT, and couldn't use -. –  Richard T Oct 20 '08 at 15:40

My weirdest one was at a contract a couple years ago. @ZombieSheep's weird one was part of it, but not the weirdest one in that company.

No, the weirdest one in that company was the database naming scheme. Every table was named in all caps, with underscores between the words. Every table had a prefix (generally 1 - 6 characters) which was usually an acronym or an abbreviation of the main table name. Every field of the table was prefixed with the same prefix as well. So, let's say you have a simple schema where people can own cats or dogs. It'd look like this:

PER_PERSON
    PER_ID
    PER_NameFirst
    PER_NameLast
    ...
CAT_CAT
    CAT_ID
    CAT_Name
    CAT_Breed
    ...
DOG_DOG
    DOG_ID
    DOG_Name
    DOG_Breed
    ...
PERCD_PERSON_CAT_DOG (for the join data)
    PERCD_ID
    PERCD_PER_ID
    PERCD_CAT_ID
    PERCD_DOG_ID

That said, as weird as this felt initially ... It grew on me. The reasons behind it made sense (after you wrapped your brain around it), as the prefixes were there to be reminders of "recommended" (and enforced!) table aliases when building joins. The prefixing made the majority of join queries easier to write, as it was very rare that you'd have to explicitly reference a table before the field.

Heck, after a while, all of us on the team (6 people on our project) were able to begin referring to tables in conversation by nothing more than the prefix. An acquired taste, to be sure ... But one that grew on me. So much so that I still use it, when I have that freedom.

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1  
My experience is Oracle people like to do things like this. –  Craig Oct 21 '08 at 0:04
2  
I can think of no better way of allowing people to discover who they would respectively dread either working for, or having work for them. You guys are on my list, feel free to put me on yours. :) –  ChrisA Feb 21 '09 at 22:50
13  
I just barfed in my mouth a little. –  ErikE Jan 22 '10 at 21:04
3  
And there was me thinking that <tablename>. was a good enough prefix for putting on column names. That's told me. –  Christian Hayter Jul 12 '10 at 19:57

The one that got me was similar to the other poster's "tbl" prefix for SQL table names.

In this case, the prefix for all stored procedures was to be "sp_" despite the fact that "sp_" is a prefix used by Microsoft for system-level stored procedures in SQL Server. Well, they had their standards from an old, non-MS database and weren't about to change just because their standard might cause a stored procedure to collide with a system stored procedure and produce unpredictable results. No, that just wouldn't be proper.

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What drives me nuts is people suffixing the ID field of a table with the name of the table. What the hell is wrong with just ID? You're going to have to alias it anyway... for the love of all that is sacred!

Imagine what your SQL statements look like when you've got id fields called IDSEWEBLASTCUSTOMERACTION and IDSEEVENTLOGGER.

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3  
Actually I think it makes queries easier to write and read. I do this. SELECT * FROM Person P LEFT JOIN PhoneNumber PN ON P.PersonID = PN.PersonID –  Craig Oct 21 '08 at 0:08
7  
my preference: ... from customer left join address on (address.id = customer.address_id) –  Chris Vest Oct 22 '08 at 13:48
1  
The OP is talking about putting the table name after 'ID', which is just weird. –  JBRWilkinson Feb 28 '10 at 22:20

To NEVER remove any code when making changes. We were told to comment all changes. Bear in mind we use source control. This policy didn't last long because developers were in an uproar about it and how it would make the code unreadable.

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3  
I really hate that... there's a few people who do that here (it's not a standard or anything though) –  chills42 Oct 20 '08 at 16:03
7  
Rules like that are why I feel a NEED to print source code I inherit from others in color. At a dime a page, that's not very nice to my company -- but it's the only way I can read it if I have to print it. (We've inherited a lot which followed this rule ... ) –  John Rudy Oct 20 '08 at 21:38
3  
Sounds like a rule developed pre source control. Or due to programmers only checking in once a week. –  Craig Oct 21 '08 at 0:09
6  
I love reading these answers because it makes my job seem 100x better. –  rjh Jun 14 '10 at 3:41
2  
Feel for you... we're on SVN for 4+ years, but the senior developer hates it and checks in about once per two months, spending the next three days complanining about broken code :/ –  Viktor Svub Jun 28 '10 at 9:02

I've had a lot of stupid rules, but not a lot that I considered downright strange.

The sillyiest was on a NASA job I worked back in the early 90's. This was a huge job, with well over 100 developers on it. The experienced developers who wrote the coding standards decided that every source file should begin with a four letter acronym, and the first letter had to stand for the group that was responsible for the file. This was probably a great idea for the old FORTRAN 77 projects they were used to.

However, this was an Ada project, with a nice hierarchal library structure, so it made no sense at all. Every directory was full of files starting with the same letter, followed by 3 more nonsense leters, an underscore, and then part of the file name that mattered. All the Ada packages had to start with this same five-character wart. Ada "use" clauses were not allowed either (arguably a good thing under normal circumstances), so that meant any reference to any identifier that wasn't local to that source file also had to include this useless wart. There probably should have been an insurrection over this, but the entire project was staffed by junior programmers and fresh from college new hires (myself being the latter).

A typical assignment statement (already verbose in Ada) would end up looking something like this:

NABC_The_Package_Name.X := NABC_The_Package_Name.X + 
  CXYZ_Some_Other_Package_Name.Delta_X;

Fortunately they were at least enlightened enough to allow us more than 80 columns! Still, the facility wart was hated enough that it became boilerplate code at the top of everyone's source files to use Ada "renames" to get rid of the wart. There'd be one rename for each imported ("withed") package. Like this:

package Package_Name renames NABC_Package_Name;
package Some_Other_Package_Name renames CXYZ_Some_Other_Package_Name;
--// Repeated in this vein for an average of 10 lines or so

What the more creative among us took to doing was trying to use the wart to make an acutally sensible (or silly) package name. (I know what you are thinking, but explitives were not allowed and shame on you! That's disgusting). For example, I was in the Common code group, and I needed to make a package to interface with the Workstation group. After a brainstorming session with the Workstation guy, we decided to name our packages so that someone needing both would have to write:

with CANT_Interface_Package;
with WONT_Interface_Package;
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With all that and NASA still couldn't figure out whether to calculate in kilometers or miles... –  NotMe Oct 21 '08 at 14:00
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Damn, and I really thought you were going to go all out and use a CUN*_ and W*NK_ package naming convention. Sorry, I have slow-burning, explosive, textual tourettes. But yours were much, much, funnier! –  defmeta Nov 24 '08 at 0:47

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