Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm started learning JavaScript promises, but I can't understand how apply, for example, Q functions to Node.js callback functions.

In similar question is recommended to use Q.denodeify(), but it works well for fs.readFile() and don't works for fs.exists().

This is a simple functions that returns list of files and their sizes in directory:

function openDir(path, callback) {
    path = __dirname + path;
    fs.exists(path, function (exists) {
        if (exists) {
            fs.readdir(path, function (err, files) {
                if (err) {
                    throw err;
                }
                var filesCounter = 0,
                    filesTotal = files.length,
                    result = [];
                files.forEach(function (filename, index) {
                    fs.stat(path + filename, function (err, stats) {
                        if (err) {
                            throw err;
                        }
                        result[index] = {};
                        result[index].name = filename;
                        result[index].size = stats.size;
                        if (++filesCounter === filesTotal) {
                            callback(result);
                        }
                    });
                });
            });
        }
    });
}

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    openDir('/', function (data) {
        res.writeHead(200, {
            'Content-Type': 'application/json; charset=utf-8'
        });
        res.end(JSON.stringify(data));
    });
}).listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');

How write this code using promises (with Q or other library)?

share|improve this question
1  
You could take a look at my gist, which uses pretty similar tasks and it's written with Q gist.github.com/riston/9022931. –  jurka Feb 16 '14 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

fs.exists is kind of a useless method. It does not return a node style call back and can usually be omitted. In your example you would handle the error from fs.readdir.

fs.exists() is an anachronism and exists only for historical reasons. There should almost never be a reason to use it in your own code. node docs

Here is your example reworked with Q, note that we defer error handling to the caller by returning a promise instead of the stats themselves. I included an example of how to handle fs.exists with Q.defer to show how you can proxy non node style callbacks.

var Q = require('q'); 
var fs = require('fs');
var http = require('http');
var readdir = Q.denodeify(fs.readdir);

function stat(file){
    return Q.nfcall(fs.stat, file)
        .then(function(stats){
            stats.filename = file;
            return stats;
        });
}

function openDir(path) {
    path = __dirname + path;

    return readdir(path)
        .then(function(files) { 
            return files.map(function(file){ 
                return stat(path + file); }); })
        .then(Q.all);
};

// proxy fs.exists to return a promise. Example of Q.defer
function exists(file){
    var deferred = Q.defer();
    fs.exists(file, function(result){
        return result ? deferred.resolve(file) : deferred.reject('invalid file');    
    });
    return deferred.promise;
}

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    openDir('/').done(
        function (data) {
            res.writeHead(200, {
                'Content-Type': 'application/json; charset=utf-8'});
            res.end(JSON.stringify(data));
        },
        function (err) {
            res.writeHead(500, {
                'Content-Type': 'application/json; charset=utf-8'});
            res.end(JSON.stringify({error: err}));
        });
    }).listen(1337, '127.0.0.1');
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.