Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I started reading JavaScript in W3schools and testing out/changing few things in the examples they give so I can see what is doing what but didn't manage to identify the syntax, yet. Below is the original code to change p tag content, the link to it.

<p id="demo">
JavaScript can change the content of an HTML element.
</p>

<script>
function myFunction()
{
x=document.getElementById("demo");  // Find the element
x.innerHTML="Hello JavaScript!";    // Change the content
}
</script>

<button type="button" onclick="myFunction()">Click Me!</button>

I want to know how to change contents with the same class, but failed as you can see that the example below doesn't work. Fiddle of code below.

<p class="demo">
JavaScript can change the content of an HTML element.
</p>

<p class="demo">Yolo</p>

<script>
function myFunction()
{
x=document.getElementsByClassName("demo");  // Find the element
x.innerHTML="Hello JavaScript!";    // Change the content
}
</script>

<button type="button" onclick="myFunction()">Click Me!</button>

If you could show me how ^^" and help me understand, is "getElementById" a variable that could be anything else or is it a command?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your x - is array of elements. try to use loop:

<body>

<p class="demo">JavaScript can change the content of an HTML element.</p>    
<p class="demo">Yolo</p>   

<button type="button" onclick="myFunction()">Click Me!</button>

<script>        
function myFunction()
{
x=document.getElementsByClassName("demo");  // Find the elements
    for(var i = 0; i < x.length; i++){
    x[i].innerText="Hello JavaScript!";    // Change the content
    }

}

</script>
</body>

See fiddle below:

http://jsfiddle.net/37jq9/7/
share|improve this answer
    
In the fiddle you have an extra line "console.log(x)" D:: what is it? –  Harlequin Feb 17 '14 at 20:15
    
See this link to find answer for this: developers.google.com/chrome-developer-tools/docs/console-api –  melvas Feb 17 '14 at 20:18
    
it just displays a message in the console. –  melvas Feb 17 '14 at 20:19
    
I use it just to make sure that everything I do is right –  melvas Feb 17 '14 at 20:20
    
Oh ok, I thought it was strage since it worked normally without it. Thanks! –  Harlequin Feb 17 '14 at 20:31

Notice how when you use:

x=document.getElementsByClassName("demo"); 

It is Elements instead of Element. This is because it returns an array a HTMLCollection of all the elements with one particular class name. In order to combat this, you can choose the first element in the array:

x=document.getElementsByClassName("demo")[0];
share|improve this answer
    
I read your answer like 4 times then I understood the array thingy! (I had an idea of array from Pascal). Tested it and worked, [0] changed the first text, [1] changed the 2nd. Thanks! Tho the loop thingy was what I intended –  Harlequin Feb 17 '14 at 20:29
    
You're welcome. Sorry if my answer was confusing. –  Anonymous Feb 17 '14 at 20:32

It is easier to use jQuery with Javascript

See this example: http://jsfiddle.net/37jq9/3/

If you use jquery instead of calling

x=document.getElementsByClassName("demo");

you can use

x = $('.demo');

but you can just call the function like this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('button').click(function(){
        $('.demo').text('Hello Javascript');
    })   
})
share|improve this answer
    
"I started reading JavaScript in W3schools" - Harlequin should learn javascript at first. –  melvas Feb 16 '14 at 15:35
1  
"Easier to use jQuery with Java"? — what? Java != JavaScript, and ideally JavaScript should be learned before developing a reliance any library. –  David Thomas Feb 16 '14 at 15:37
    
Ya I thought I'd learn JavaScript first then JQuery! –  Harlequin Feb 17 '14 at 20:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.