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I want to make a small program that gets as inputs (1) A X509 Certificate (2) the corresponding CA that signed this certificate. It should verify this certificate if it is intact or not by verifying the signature. To do so, I believe first I need to extract two things: (1) The Signature Value (2) the remaining certificate fields. The following code works fine for getting the public key but I need the signature value for my purpose.

URL httpslink = new URL("https://mail.yahoo.com");
HttpsURLConnection con = (HttpsURLConnection) httpslink.openConnection();
con.connect();
Certificate ct[] = con.getServerCertificates();

X509Certificate c = ((X509Certificate) ct[0]);
System.out.println(c.getPublicKey().toString());

I tried many ways to get the signature value but I failed. Can you guys give me at least a hit to do so. THANK YOU

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried the getSignature method? docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/security/cert/… –  Jumbogram Feb 17 '14 at 1:44
    
Yes, I have .. it doesn't show me the signature value though! It show me this strange value => [B@5fa34e31 –  user3317181 Feb 17 '14 at 2:39
    
That's the result of calling toString() on a byte[] array. The contents are still the signature. –  EJP Feb 17 '14 at 5:13
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is founded on a mistake. –  EJP Feb 17 '14 at 5:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As comments already indicate, using the getSignature method you do get the signature. It is a byte[], though. Thus, you should not expect anything usable from its toString value.

Concerning your original objective, though:

verify this certificate if it is intact or not by verifying the signature.

You do not need to do all that stuff manually. Instead your should use the Certificate methods getPublicKey and verify:

boolean check (Certificate testCert, Certificate caCert)
{
    try
    {
        testCert.verify(caCert.getPublicKey());
        return true;
    }
    catch (GeneralSecurityException e)
    {
        return false;
    }
]

Depending on the algorithms used you may need to use the other verify overload to supply an explicit provider.

For those in doubt the according Certificate method comments:

/**
 * Verifies that this certificate was signed using the
 * private key that corresponds to the specified public key.
 *
 * @param key the PublicKey used to carry out the verification.
 *
 * ...
 */
public abstract void verify(PublicKey key)

/**
 * Gets the public key from this certificate.
 *
 * @return the public key.
 */
public abstract PublicKey getPublicKey()
share|improve this answer
    
@EJP You are totally wrong. –  mkl Feb 17 '14 at 9:11
    
@EJP The CA certificate and the certificate it signed have the same public key? - nobody claimed that. See my addition to the answer, testCert.verify Verifies that this certificate was signed using the private key that corresponds to the specified public key. –  mkl Feb 17 '14 at 9:23
    
@EJP The idea is that you have the subject's public key via another source. - No, the idea is that you have the CA certificate and check whether the private key associated with it had signed the certificate to test. This is what the OP asked for: I want to make a small program that gets as inputs (1) A X509 Certificate (2) the corresponding CA that signed this certificate. It should verify this certificate if it is intact or not by verifying the signature. –  mkl Feb 17 '14 at 9:30
    
OK thanks. 'Totally wrong' doesn't exactly encapsulate all that information, or indeed any of it. –  EJP Feb 17 '14 at 9:31
    
'Totally wrong' doesn't exactly encapsulate all that information - Admittedly it doesn't. But I think everything has meanwhile been made clear. –  mkl Feb 17 '14 at 10:10

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