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I need to write a function to convert big endian to little endian in C. I can not use any library function.

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11  
What have you tried so far? –  jamesdlin Feb 2 '10 at 5:11
5  
Big endian what to little endian what? –  Alok Singhal Feb 2 '10 at 5:12
3  
a 16 bit value? 32 bit value? float? an array? –  John Knoeller Feb 2 '10 at 5:54
2  
time to choose an answer perhaps? –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 9:02
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14 Answers

Assuming what you need is a simple byte swap, try something like

Unsigned 16 bit conversion:

swapped = (num>>8) | (num<<8)

Unsigned 32-bit conversion:

swapped = ((num>>24)&0xff) | // move byte 3 to byte 0
                    ((num<<8)&0xff0000) | // move byte 1 to byte 2
                    ((num>>8)&0xff00) | // move byte 2 to byte 1
                    ((num<<24)&0xff000000 // byte 0 to byte 3

This swaps the byte orders from positions 1234 to 4321. If your input was 0xdeadbeef, a 32-bit endian swap might have output of 0xefbeadde.

The code above should be cleaned up with macros or at least constants instead of magic numbers, but hopefully it helps as is

EDIT: as another answer pointed out, there are platform, OS, and instruction set specific alternatives which can be MUCH faster than the above. In the Linux kernel there are macros (cpu_to_be32 for example) which handle endianness pretty nicely. But these alternatives are specific to their environments. In practice endianness is best dealt with using a blend of available approaches

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+1 for mentioning platform/hardware-specific methods. Programs are always run on some hardware, and hardware features are always fastest. –  Eonil Jul 31 '12 at 6:47
1  
This answer should have accepted a long time ago... –  Joze Mar 8 '13 at 15:55
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By including:

#include <byteswap.h>

you can get an optimized version of machine-dependent byte-swapping functions. Then, you can easily use the following functions:

__bswap_32 (uint32_t input)

or

__bswap_16 (uint16_t input)
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1  
Did you miss the part that said "I can not use any library function"? –  Mark Ransom Aug 5 '11 at 19:03
1  
Should read #include <byteswap.h>, see comment in the .h file itself. This post contains helpful information so I up-voted despite the author ignoring the OP requirement to not use a lib function. –  Eli Rosencruft May 20 '12 at 12:48
5  
In fact, the __bswap_32/__bswap_16 functions are in fact macros and not library functions, another reason to up-vote. –  Eli Rosencruft May 20 '12 at 13:56
    
Where can I find this header? The only I got was LGPL, and doesn't look one of standard header. It means it may not available on LGPL-incompatible system and I can't copy it into the system. –  Eonil Jul 31 '12 at 6:44
1  
My understanding is that this header is not guaranteed to exist for all operating systems on all architectures. I have yet to find a portable way to deal with endian issues. –  Edward Falk Feb 18 '13 at 23:04
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#include <stdint.h>


//! Byte swap unsigned short
uint16_t swap_uint16( uint16_t val ) 
{
    return (val << 8) | (val >> 8 );
}

//! Byte swap short
int16_t swap_int16( int16_t val ) 
{
    return (val << 8) | ((val >> 8) & 0xFF);
}

//! Byte swap unsigned int
uint32_t swap_uint32( uint32_t val )
{
    val = ((val << 8) & 0xFF00FF00 ) | ((val >> 8) & 0xFF00FF ); 
    return (val << 16) | (val >> 16);
}

//! Byte swap int
int32_t swap_int32( int32_t val )
{
    val = ((val << 8) & 0xFF00FF00) | ((val >> 8) & 0xFF00FF ); 
    return (val << 16) | ((val >> 16) & 0xFFFF);
}

Update : Added 64bit byte swapping

int64_t swap_int64( int64_t val )
{
    val = ((val << 8) & 0xFF00FF00FF00FF00ULL ) | ((val >> 8) & 0x00FF00FF00FF00FFULL );
    val = ((val << 16) & 0xFFFF0000FFFF0000ULL ) | ((val >> 16) & 0x0000FFFF0000FFFFULL );
    return (val << 32) | ((val >> 32) & 0xFFFFFFFFULL);
}

uint64_t swap_uint64( uint64_t val )
{
    val = ((val << 8) & 0xFF00FF00FF00FF00ULL ) | ((val >> 8) & 0x00FF00FF00FF00FFULL );
    val = ((val << 16) & 0xFFFF0000FFFF0000ULL ) | ((val >> 16) & 0x0000FFFF0000FFFFULL );
    return (val << 32) | (val >> 32);
}
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For the int32_t and int64_t variants, what is the reasoning behind the masking of ... & 0xFFFF and ... & 0xFFFFFFFFULL? Is there something going on with sign-extension here I'm not seeing? Also, why is swap_int64 returning uint64_t? Shouldn't that be int64_t? –  bgoodr Nov 2 '12 at 14:57
1  
The swap_int64 returning a uint64 is indeed an error. The masking with signed int values is indeed to remove the sign. Shifting right injects the sign bit on the left. We could avoid this by simply calling the unsigned int swapping operation. –  chmike Nov 3 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks. You might want to change the type of the return value for swap_int64 in your answer. +1 for the helpful answer, BTW! –  bgoodr Nov 4 '12 at 17:18
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Edit: These are library functions. Following them is the manual way to do it.

I am absolutely stunned by the number of people unaware of __byteswap_ushort, __byteswap_ulong, and __byteswap_uint64. Sure they are Visual C++ specific, but they compile down to some delicious code on x86/IA-64 architectures. :)

Here's an explicit usage of the bswap instruction, pulled from this page. Note that the intrinsic form above will always be faster than this, I only added it to give an answer without a library routine.

uint32 cq_ntohl(uint32 a) {
    __asm{
        mov eax, a;
        bswap eax; 
    }
}
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14  
For a C question, you're suggesting something that's specific to Visual C++? –  Alok Singhal Feb 2 '10 at 6:29
2  
@Alok: Visual C++ is a product by Microsoft. It works just fine for compiling C code. :) –  280Z28 Feb 2 '10 at 6:30
7  
Why does it stun you that many people aren't aware of Microsoft-specific implementations of byteswapping? –  dreamlax Feb 2 '10 at 6:32
17  
Cool, that's good info for anyone developing a closed source product which doesn't need to be portable or standards compliant. –  Sam Post Feb 2 '10 at 6:38
2  
@Alok, OP did not mention the compiler|OS. A person is allowed to give answers according to his experience with a particular set of tools. –  Aniket Nov 5 '12 at 9:04
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Here's a fairly generic version; I haven't compiled it, so there are probably typos, but you should get the idea,

void SwapBytes(void *pv, size_t n)
{
    char *p = pv;
    size_t lo, hi;
    for(lo=0, hi=n-1; hi>lo; lo++, hi--)
    {
        char tmp=p[lo];
        p[lo] = p[hi];
        p[hi] = tmp;
    }
}
#define SWAP(x) SwapBytes(&x, sizeof(x));

NB: This is not optimised for speed or space. It is intended to be clear (easy to debug) and portable.

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1  
you can use xorSwap for better performance. Prefer this generic version above all the size specific ones... –  nus Jun 27 '10 at 2:14
    
I tested it, it turns out this is faster than xorSwap... on x86. stackoverflow.com/questions/3128095/… –  nus Aug 16 '10 at 13:39
1  
@nus -- One of the advantages of very simple code is that the compiler optimiser can sometimes make it very fast. –  Michael J Dec 24 '13 at 6:31
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If you need macros (e.g. embedded system):

#define SWAP_UINT16(x) (((x) >> 8) | ((x) << 8))
#define SWAP_UINT32(x) (((x) >> 24) | (((x) & 0x00FF0000) >> 8) | (((x) & 0x0000FF00) << 8) | ((x) << 24))
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here's a way using the SSSE3 instruction pshufb using its Intel intrinsic, assuming you have a multiple of 4 ints:

unsigned int *bswap(unsigned int *destination, unsigned int *source, int length) {
    int i;
    __m128i mask = _mm_set_epi8(12, 13, 14, 15, 8, 9, 10, 11, 4, 5, 6, 7, 0, 1, 2, 3);
    for (i = 0; i < length; i += 4) {
        _mm_storeu_si128((__m128i *)&destination[i],
        _mm_shuffle_epi8(_mm_loadu_si128((__m128i *)&source[i]), mask));
    }
    return destination;
}
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for all your bit twiddling needs
http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html

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Nifty bit manipulation snippets. In this situation, however, the OP will need a simple bytes swapping logic. –  mjv Feb 2 '10 at 5:48
1  
Good page for researching bit hacks, but doesn't answer his specific question –  Sam Post Feb 2 '10 at 6:52
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Will this work / be faster?

 uint32_t swapped, result;

((byte*)&swapped)[0] = ((byte*)&result)[3];
((byte*)&swapped)[1] = ((byte*)&result)[2];
((byte*)&swapped)[2] = ((byte*)&result)[1];
((byte*)&swapped)[3] = ((byte*)&result)[0];
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I think you mean char, not byte. –  dreamlax Aug 4 '10 at 21:42
    
Using this strategy, the solution with most votes compared to yours is equivalent and the most efficient and portable. However the solution I propose (second most votes) needs less operations and should be more efficient. –  chmike Dec 5 '12 at 9:07
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EDIT: This function only swaps the endianness of aligned 16 bit words. A function often necessary for UTF-16/UCS-2 encodings. EDIT END.

If you want to change the endianess of a memory block you can use my blazingly fast approach. Your memory array should have a size that is a multiple of 8.

#include <stddef.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stdint.h>

void ChangeMemEndianness(uint64_t *mem, size_t size) 
{
uint64_t m1 = 0xFF00FF00FF00FF00ULL, m2 = m1 >> CHAR_BIT;

size = (size + (sizeof (uint64_t) - 1)) / sizeof (uint64_t);
for(; size; size--, mem++)
  *mem = ((*mem & m1) >> CHAR_BIT) | ((*mem & m2) << CHAR_BIT);
}

This kind of function is useful for changing the endianess of Unicode UCS-2/UTF-16 files.

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CHAR_BIT #define is missing to make code complete. –  Tõnu Samuel Nov 2 '13 at 4:57
    
Ok, I added the missing includes. –  tristopia Nov 3 '13 at 13:21
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As a joke:


#include <stdio.h>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    size_t sizeofInt = sizeof (int);
    int i;

    union
    {
        int x;
        char c[sizeof (int)];
    } original, swapped;

    original.x = 0x12345678;

    for (i = 0; i < sizeofInt; i++)
        swapped.c[sizeofInt - i - 1] = original.c[i];

    fprintf (stderr, "%x\n", swapped.x);

    return 0;
}
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Here's a function I have been using - tested and works on any basic data type:

//  SwapBytes.h
//
//  Function to perform in-place endian conversion of basic types
//
//  Usage:
//
//    double d;
//    SwapBytes(&d, sizeof(d));
//

inline void SwapBytes(void *source, int size)
{
    typedef unsigned char TwoBytes[2];
    typedef unsigned char FourBytes[4];
    typedef unsigned char EightBytes[8];

    unsigned char temp;

    if(size == 2)
    {
        TwoBytes *src = (TwoBytes *)source;
        temp = (*src)[0];
        (*src)[0] = (*src)[1];
        (*src)[1] = temp;

        return;
    }

    if(size == 4)
    {
        FourBytes *src = (FourBytes *)source;
        temp = (*src)[0];
        (*src)[0] = (*src)[3];
        (*src)[3] = temp;

        temp = (*src)[1];
        (*src)[1] = (*src)[2];
        (*src)[2] = temp;

        return;
    }

    if(size == 8)
    {
        EightBytes *src = (EightBytes *)source;
        temp = (*src)[0];
        (*src)[0] = (*src)[7];
        (*src)[7] = temp;

        temp = (*src)[1];
        (*src)[1] = (*src)[6];
        (*src)[6] = temp;

        temp = (*src)[2];
        (*src)[2] = (*src)[5];
        (*src)[5] = temp;

        temp = (*src)[3];
        (*src)[3] = (*src)[4];
        (*src)[4] = temp;

        return;
    }

}
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This code snippet can convert 32bit little Endian number to Big Endian number.

#include <stdio.h> 
main(){    
unsigned int i = 0xfafbfcfd;    
unsigned int j;    
j= ((i&0xff000000)>>24)| ((i&0xff0000)>>8) | ((i&0xff00)
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Thanks @YuHao I am new here, don't know how to format the Text. –  Kaushal Billore Jul 2 '13 at 11:21
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If you are running on a x86 or x86_64 processor, the big endian is native. so

for 16 bit values

unsigned short wBigE = value;
unsigned short wLittleE = ((wBigE & 0xFF) << 8) | (wBigE >> 8);

for 32 bit values

unsigned int   iBigE = value;
unsigned int   iLittleE = ((iBigE & 0xFF) << 24)
                        | ((iBigE & 0xFF00) << 8)
                        | ((iBigE >> 8) & 0xFF00)
                        | (iBigE >> 24);

This isn't the most efficient solution unless the compiler recognises that this is byte level manipulation and generates byte swapping code. But it doesn't depend on any memory layout tricks and can be turned into a macro pretty easily.

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1  
On x86 and x86_64 architectures the little endian scheme is the native one. –  Grisu Feb 5 at 11:42
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