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I found this puzzle in a C aptitude paper.

void change()
{
    //write something in this function so that output of printf in main function
    //should always give 5.you can't change the main function
}

int main()
{
    int i = 5;
    change();
    i = 10;
    printf("%d", i);
    return 0;
}

Any solutions.?

share|improve this question
    
yawn... stuff like that was topic in the Obfuscated C Contest 20 years ago already. –  Thorsten79 Feb 2 '10 at 12:39
1  
Puzzles like this make more sense to test whether people spot a missing \n at the end of the output or a missing declaration for printf function. –  AndreyT Feb 2 '10 at 21:18
4  
+1 there are some really excellent answers here, despite the initial skepticism. Doubters should check out the POSIX-compliant, no-macros version. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:20

15 Answers 15

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Here's a really cheap answer:

void
change()
{
    printf("%d", 5);
    exit(0);
}

:-P

share|improve this answer
4  
"so that output of printf in main function should always give 5" –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 5:47
12  
You can downvote all you like, but really, none of the answers really call "printf in main" either, so. :-P –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 2 '10 at 5:57
1  
@Chris Jester-Young: Which is why the stack corruption answer is probably the correct one which makes the question completely obnoxious. –  Jason Feb 2 '10 at 6:02
1  
@Chris Jester-Young: my answer really calls printf in main. –  Laurence Gonsalves Feb 3 '10 at 4:48
4  
I don't feel guilty for up-voting this. The answer addresses the requirement and exits with its nose properly in the air. –  Tim Post Mar 28 '10 at 18:07

This is a POSIX answer that really does what the problem asks :)

It won't work on some architectures/compilers but it does here.

#include <stdio.h>

void
change () {

    void _change();
    _change();
}
#include <string.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
void
_change()
{
    int main();
    uintptr_t m=(uintptr_t)main;
    uintptr_t ps=sysconf(_SC_PAGESIZE);
    m/=ps;
    m*=ps;
    mprotect((void*)m,ps,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE|PROT_EXEC);
    char *s=(char*)(intptr_t)main;
    s=memchr(s,10,ps);
    *s=5;
    mprotect((void*)m,ps,PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC);

}

int
main() {
    int i=5;
    change();
    i=10;
    printf ("%d\n",i);
    return 0;
}

EDIT: This should make it more robust for people with boycotting headers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 astounding. I had to move the #includes to the top to get it to compile, but it works like a charm, and this technique is quite brutal. You win at least 3 internets. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:02
1  
I'd personally like to factor sysconf(_SC_PAGESIZE) into a variable, rather than calling sysconf 5 times. :-P –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 4 '10 at 6:04
2  
@jbcreix - I like your indexing. I'm using gcc -Wall -Wextra -Werror by default. I bet it would compile fine if I cranked down the warnings. I just forget about them because they're so nice most of the time. Update: Nope, even without any warnings I have to turn on -fnested-functions, and then it still spits out a warning. I blame OS X though. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:17
2  
@SiegeX - The function _change looks into the machine code of the main function, makes it writable, searches for a 10, and changes the 10 to a 5. Thus, when _change returns to change and change returns to main, the next line, i = 10; will have been changed to i = 5; in the machine code that gets executed. It's self-modifying code. –  Chris Lutz Jan 12 '11 at 1:00
1  
@SiegeX - C++ prohibits calling main, but in C calling main from another function is perfectly legal. And yes, the pointer points to the code segment. It's a function pointer, cast to a regular pointer (which is UB but works in practice on POSIX systems which we're already assuming anyway). –  Chris Lutz Jan 12 '11 at 2:03

define?

#include <stdio.h>

void change()
{
//write something in this function so that output of printf in main function
//should always give 5.you can't change the main function
#define printf_ printf
#define printf(a, b) printf_("5");
}

int main()
{
       int i = 5;
       change();
       i = 10;
       printf("%d", i);
       return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Seen this problem before, and this was the solution. –  Gregory Feb 2 '10 at 5:48
6  
what the hell is the moral of this story? what is this meant to teach?? I didn't know they did classes on how to write horribly unmanageable and hacked code... (though by the amount I've seen, I wouldn't be surprised if they did...) –  matt Feb 2 '10 at 7:27
1  
@RC: I can't really believe this is the real solution. What would be the point of the change() function? If this is the expected answer then wouldn't the question simply say "Write something here" above main() without bothering with the function? –  GrahamS Feb 2 '10 at 12:20
3  
Another solution with only one macro is #define printf(a, b) (printf)("5") which neatly avoids any recursive macro expansion issues (my compiler likes to complain when people have recursive macros, which is probably good). Though I prefer the puts() version because it adds a newline for readability. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 5:49
1  
Quoth the preprocessor: "Abuse me! Abuse me! MAKE ME FEEL WANTED!" –  Tim Post Mar 28 '10 at 18:11
void change()
{
  //write something in this function so that output of printf in main function
  //should always give 5.you can't change the main function
  #define i a=5,b
}
share|improve this answer
1  
@Laurence: Clever :) –  AndreyT Feb 2 '10 at 8:59
    
-1, That would not work. printf("%d", i) would be replaced by the preprocessor to be printf("%d", a=5,) which would not compile. –  GrahamS Feb 2 '10 at 11:59
1  
Well, it'll be replaced with printf("%d", a=5,b). Does that compile? I'm not sure how printf works –  Chris Burt-Brown Feb 2 '10 at 12:24
1  
@Graham, @Chris: Yes, that works. Extra arguments to printf are ignored. –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 2 '10 at 14:54
5  
@GrahamS it does work. printf("%d", i) is replaced by printf("%d", a=5,b) (not sure why you thought the b would be omitted). a=5 is an expression that evaluates to 5. The b is passed to printf as well (printf uses varargs), but printf ignores it because there's only one formatting code (the %d). Some compilers might warn that you're passing an extra argument to printf, but it's still valid standard C to do so. –  Laurence Gonsalves Feb 3 '10 at 1:21

Here's another possibility:

void change()
{
  char const *literal = "%d";
  char * ptr = (char*)literal;
  ptr[0] = '5';
  ptr[1] = 0;
}

This is much more portable than changing the return address, but requires you to (a) have a compiler that pools string literals (most do), and (b) have a compiler that doesn't place constants in a read-only section, or be running on an architecture with no MMU (unlikely these days).

share|improve this answer
1  
Very clever! I like it :D –  Thomas Feb 2 '10 at 12:35
    
I sadly get a Bus error on OS X before anything prints, so I have no idea if this worked. But it is an excellent solution. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:13
1  
@jbcreix's mprotect() trick should work with this too. –  moonshadow Feb 4 '10 at 12:34
    
Dangit! I was just about to post this! –  MSN Feb 5 '10 at 1:01
    
You'd need to build with -fwritable-strings for that to work. I like it! –  Donal Fellows Mar 28 '10 at 11:01

Invoke the requisite #include, and replace the comment with the parenthesis-unbalanced text:

}
int printf(const char *s, ...) {
  return fprintf(stdout,"%d",5);

Tested successfully. Thanks to dreamlax and Chris Lutz for bugfixes.

share|improve this answer
    
printf returns int, you have it defined as having no return value. –  dreamlax Feb 2 '10 at 10:35
    
printf returns an int but your implementation returns no value. return fprintf is in order, methinks. But +1 for extreme cleverness. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 5:59

Anybody thought of using atexit?


void change (void)
{
    static int i = 0;
    if (i == 0) atexit (change);

    if (i == 1) printf ("\r5 \b\n");
    ++i;
}

Note that there is no terminating newline in the main function, if we send 2 backspace characters to stdout, the 10 will be erased, and only the 5 will be printed.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! I thought about deleting the 5 with terminal backspaces, but didn't think of a way to get change() called after the printf below. You can also do printf("\r5 \b\n");, as \r (carriage return) rewinds the cursor. –  Joey Adams Mar 28 '10 at 18:16
    
changed it to \r5 \b\n, it looks cleaner. –  Joe D Mar 28 '10 at 18:40

You have a local variable i in the stack that has a value of 5 to begin with.

With change(), you need to modify the next instruction to be 5 so you would need to buffer override to that location where 10 is set, and have it set to 5.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I believe this is the right answer. –  Nick Dandoulakis Feb 2 '10 at 5:57
    
There's only one little flaw with this idea. On modern operating systems, executable pages are not writable. So, self-modifying code is not very likely to work. –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 2 '10 at 6:02
    
Very true Chris. The nature of the question seemed academic, and theoretically, this is one option. –  Brian Liang Feb 2 '10 at 6:06
1  
This takes me back... To clarify, if I understand correctly: when you reach change the stack should have a return address. You want to use that address to find the next instruction (assuming you know its size), and change it to no-op? –  Kobi Feb 2 '10 at 6:17

The printf("%d", i); call in main() doesn't end its output in a newline, the behavior of the program is implementation-defined.

I assert that on my implementation, a program that fails to write a terminating newline for the final line always prints 5 followed by a newline as its last line.

Thus, the output will always be 5, whatever the definition of change(). :-)

(In other words, what's the point of such questions, unless they're meant to run on particular hardware, compiler, etc.?)

share|improve this answer
1  
What?! I thought the undefined behaviour comes about when your source file does not end in a newline, not when the program's output doesn't end in a newline. –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 2 '10 at 6:35
3  
C99 7.19.2.2: A text stream is an ordered sequence of characters composed into lines, each line consisting of zero or more characters plus a terminating new-line character. Whether the last line requires a terminating new-line character is implementation-defined. I was wrong about "undefined", it should be "implementation-defined", but my answer is still correct, in spirit :-) –  Alok Singhal Feb 2 '10 at 6:40
6  
@Alok - I disagree with your reading. I don't see it saying "implementation defined behavior if you don't end with a newline," but rather "implementation defined behavior whether you have to end with a newline." Good try, though. Would have been beautiful if the standard was looser. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 5:57
    
@Chris: but I don't see the difference. An implementation can define "it's okay to not end your final line with a newline", but another can say, "no, you MUST end the final line with a newline, otherwise I'm going to print 5". –  Alok Singhal Feb 4 '10 at 6:00
    
@Alok - Okay, yeah. I think this is probably just a miswording on the part of the standard, but you are correct. +1 for sheer pedantry. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:09
void change()
{
#define printf(x,y) fprintf(stdout,x,y-5)
}
share|improve this answer
    
oh... I like this one. –  Hogan Feb 2 '10 at 5:52
    
If you want to golf this down you can go #define printf(x,y) (printf)(x,y-5) and avoid an unsightly recursive-looking macro. But if you really wanted to golf puts is the way to go. +1 for using the original input. –  Chris Lutz Feb 4 '10 at 6:15
    
@Chris Lutz: Good one. And in that case why not just #define printf(x,y) (printf)(x,5)? –  Arun Mar 2 '10 at 5:16

Simple:

void change()
{
    printf("%d\n", 5);
    int foo;
    close(0);
    close(1);
    dup2(foo, 1);
    dup2(foo, 0);
}

Slightly more sophisticated:

void change()
{
    int *outfd = malloc(2 * sizeof(int));
    char buf[3];
    pipe(outfd);
    if(!fork())
    {
    read(outfd[0], buf, 2);
    if(buf[0] == '1' && buf[1] == '0')
    {   
        printf("5\n");
    }
    else
    {
        write(1, buf, 2);
    }
    while(1);
    }
    else
    {
    close(1);
    dup2(outfd[1], 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You'd have been better to have opened /dev/null for the new stdout. –  Donal Fellows Mar 28 '10 at 11:04

I suspect that the "correct" answer to this is to modify the return address on the stack within the change() function, so that when it returns the control flow skips the i=10 command and goes straight to the printf.

If so then that is a horrible, ugly question and the (non-portable) answer requires knowledge of the architecture and instruction set used.

share|improve this answer

How about something like this: (x86 only)

change()  
{
    __asm__( "mov eax, [ebp+4]\n\t"
             "add eax, 4\n\t"
             "mov [ebp+4], eax\n\t" );
}
share|improve this answer

here is a different one:

void change()
{
#define printf(x,y) printf("5",x,y);
}

do I get the "smallest #define to solve a silly problem award"?

share|improve this answer
4  
No you don't. See Laurence Gonsalves' answer. –  finnw Feb 4 '10 at 12:03

I am not sure this would always work, but what about locating the i variable on the stack like this:

 void change()
 {  
     int j, *p;
     for (j=-100, p=&j; j<0; j++, p++)
        if (*p == 10) { *p = 5; break; }
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
You could do that, but i is changed after change is called. So when printf is called the value of i will still be 10. –  Joe D Mar 28 '10 at 11:20

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