Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the code as below:

template <typename T, typename sepT = char>
void print2d(const T &data, sepT sep = ',') {
    for(auto i = std::begin(data); i < std::end(data); ++i) {
        decltype(*i) tmp = *i;
        for(auto j = std::begin(tmp); j < std::end(tmp); ++j) {
            std::cout << *j << sep;
        }
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}

int main(){
    std::vector<std::vector<int> > v = {{11}, {2,3}, {33,44,55}};
    print2d(v);

    int arr[2][2] = {{1,2},{3,4}};
    print2d(arr);

    return 0;
}

If I change the decltype to auto, it won't compile and complain (partial error):

2d_iterator.cpp: In instantiation of ‘void print2d(const T&, sepT) [with T = int [2][2]; sepT = char]’:
2d_iterator.cpp:21:21:   required from here
2d_iterator.cpp:9:36: error: no matching function for call to ‘begin(const int*&)’
2d_iterator.cpp:9:36: note: candidates are:
In file included from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/string:53:0,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/bits/locale_classes.h:42,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/bits/ios_base.h:43,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/ios:43,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/ostream:40,
                 from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.7.2/../../../../include/c++/4.7.2/iterator:64,

Why is this happening?

share|improve this question
13  
decltype yields int(&)[2], whilst plain auto forces a pointer conversion (same rules as template argument deduction). Just use auto&. –  Xeo Feb 17 at 8:29
2  
@Xeo That should be an answer. –  Angew Feb 17 at 8:33
    
@Xeo Can you make an answer? Also can you point me a URL that explain this deduction rule? –  texasbruce Feb 17 at 8:35
    
@texasbruce The rules are defined in §7.1.6.4 auto specifier paragraph 6 and 7. You may find this useful: Scott Meyers' blog: Universal References in C++11—Scott Meyers –  CouchDeveloper Feb 17 at 8:55
2  
please use i != std::end(data) instead of <: the latter assumes random access iterators, so passing a std::list to your print2d will fail. –  TemplateRex Feb 17 at 9:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The answer summed-up in one comment:

decltype yields int(&)[2], whilst plain auto forces a pointer conversion (same rules as template argument deduction). Just use auto&. - Xeo


@Xeo's comment-answer basically says that because auto involves the same rules as template argument type deduction, auto deduces a pointer (int*) type out of the source's array type (of i, specifically int(&)[2]).

There is something great in your code: it actually demonstrates how template type deduction behaves when the parameter is a reference and how the reference affects how the type is being deduced.

template <typename T, typename sepT = char>
void print2d(const T &data, sepT sep = ',') {
    ...
}

...

int arr[2][2] = {{1,2},{3,4}};
print2d(arr);

You can see that data is of type const T&, a reference to a const T. Now, it is being passed with arr, whose type is int[2][2], which is an array of two arrays of two ints (whoo!). Now come template argument type deduction. On this situation, it rules that with data being a reference, T should be deduced with the original type of the argument, which is int[2][2]. Then, it applies any qualifications to the parameter type to the parameter, and with data's qualified type being const T&, the const and & qualifiers are applied and so data's type is const int (&) [2][2].

template <typename T, typename sepT = char>
void print2d(const T &data, sepT sep = ',') {
    static_assert(std::is_same<T, int[2][2]>::value, "Fail");
    static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(data), const int(&)[2][2]>::value, "Fail");
}

...

int arr[2][2] = {{1,2},{3,4}};
print2d(arr);

LIVE CODE

However, if data would have been a non-reference, template argument type deduction rules that if the argument's type is an array type (e.g. int[2][2]), the array type shall "decay" to its corresponding pointer type, thus making int[2][2] into int(*)[2] (plus const if parameter is const) (fix courtesy of @Xeo).


Great! I just explained the part that is entirely not what caused the error. (And I just explained a great deal of template magic)...

... Nevermind about that. Now to the error. But before we go, keep this on your mind:

auto == template argument type deduction
         + std::initializer_list deduction for brace init-lists   // <-- This std::initializer_list thingy is not relevant to your problem,
                                                                  //    and is only included to prevent any outbreak of pedantry.

Now, your code:

for(auto i = std::begin(data); i < std::end(data); ++i) {
    decltype(*i) tmp = *i;
    for(auto j = std::begin(tmp); j < std::end(tmp); ++j) {
        std::cout << *j << sep;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

Some prerequisites before the battle:

  • decltype(data) == const int (&) [2][2]
  • decltype(i) == const int (*) [2] (see std::begin), which is a pointer to an int[2].

Now when you do decltype(*i) tmp = *i;, decltype(*i) would return const int(&)[2] , a reference to an int[2] (remember the word dereference). Thus, it is also tmp's type. You preserved the original type by using decltype(*i).

However, when you do

auto tmp = *i;

Guess what decltype(tmp) is: int*! Why? Because all of the blabbery-blablablah above, and some template magic.

So, why the error with int*? Because std::begin expects an array type, not its lesser decayed-to pointer. Thus, auto j = std::begin(tmp) would cause an error when tmp is int*.

How to solve (also tl;dr)?

  • Keep as-is. Use decltype.

  • Guess what. Make your autoed variable a reference!

    auto& tmp = *i;
    

    LIVE CODE

    or

    const auto& tmp = *i;
    

    if you don't intend to modify the contents of tmp. (Greatness by Jon Purdy)


Moral of the story: A great comment saves a man a thousand words.


UPDATE: added const to the types given by decltype(i) and decltype(*i), as std::begin(data) would return a const pointer due to data also being const (fix by litb, thanks)

share|improve this answer
1  
const auto& would be even better. –  Jon Purdy Feb 17 at 9:44
    
still, can you point me where in C++11 spec that says auto forces a pointer conversion? –  texasbruce Feb 17 at 9:45
    
@JonPurdy auto& is enough, for it also deduces const if the source is also const, but yeah, that is much better if you don't intend to modify your variable. –  Mark Garcia Feb 17 at 9:45
2  
int[2][2] decays to int(*)[2], not a pointer-to-pointer. –  Xeo Feb 17 at 10:22
1  
Nice answer. But why is decltype(i) not const int (*) [2] instead of int (*) [2]? After all, data was deduced as const int (&) [2][2] so std::begin should better return something pointing to const data? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 18 at 13:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.