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I want to know which macro gets replaced first in the following code

#define A 100
#define B 200
#define C(A,B) A+B

here when we use C, then evaluation will be from left to right or right to left. That is B gets the value first or A gets the value first

i gave this example just to make things look simple, may be i was wrong. the actual thing i want to ask is, if A and B also take arguments and have the scope of expansion, then which one would expand first

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Just use macros for simple things - use the compiler for more complex things. It has type safety for one. Try to avoid macros –  Ed Heal Feb 17 at 9:13
1  
I can't be the only one that is staring at this thinking both the A and B macros are irrelevant. (not that I live and die in a preprocessor world, but still...) –  WhozCraig Feb 17 at 9:16
    
There is nothing to be replaced, since you don't evaluate anything. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 17 at 9:16
    
@WhozCraig - you are not the only one –  Ed Heal Feb 17 at 9:17
1  
A and B in the function-like macro C are macro arguments. They don't have anything to do with the A and B defines. –  Groo Feb 17 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure what you mean. There's never a point where you can "see" half a result of the preprocessor; the entire input file is preprocessed, then handed over to the compiler.

I think that the names for the macro arguments will never also be replaced as if they were stand-alone symbols.

I tried it, and this program:

#include <stdio.h>

#define A 100
#define B 200
#define C(A, B) A + B

int main(void) {
  printf("A=%d\nB=%d\nC(1,2)=%d\n", A, B, C(1,2));
  return 0;
}

prints

A=100
B=200
C(1,2)=3

So, C(1,2) expands to 1 + 2, the definitions of A and B don't matter.

Of course I must say that I find the above very bad practice, since it's quite confusing. Never use all-caps names for macro arguments, since macros and preprocessor symbols tend to use such names.

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+1 The closing paragraph in this should taught until recitation from a broken slumber is achieved. –  WhozCraig Feb 17 at 9:17
    
I don't think that this is "bad" practice, or say worse than have any function or macro parameter named the same as another symbol. Has nothing to do with all caps names. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 17 at 9:18
    
i gave this example just to make things look simple, may be i was wrong. the actual thing i want to ask is, if A and B also take arguments and have the scope of expansion, then which one would expand first –  kharevbv Feb 17 at 9:36
    
@kharevbv I think you maybe should post a new question, that really contains what you want to ask. –  unwind Feb 17 at 9:37
1  
@kharevbv, pretty sure the order of evaluation is undefined. I don't have the sources to back me up right now but I'm pretty sure it's true. –  tangrs Feb 17 at 9:57

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