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I'm interested in doing a "Solar System" simulator that will allow me to simulate the rotational and gravitational forces of planets and stars.

I'd like to be able to say, simulate our solar system, and simulate it across varying speeds (ie, watch Earth and other planets rotate around the sun across days, years, etc). I'd like to be able to add planets and change planets mass, etc, to see how it would effect the system.

Does anyone have any resources that would point me in the right direction for writing this sort of simulator?

Are there any existing physics engines which are designed for this purpose?

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2  
F = G.m1.m2.r^2 ? –  skaffman Feb 2 '10 at 8:11
6  
@skaffman : r^(-2) ;) –  Stefano Borini Feb 2 '10 at 8:19
    
@skaffman I want this kind of formula, except for collisions, for simulating "fluids". I don't really know math/physics much at all, so if you could give me some simple help, I would appreciate that a lot. –  Asmageddon Mar 13 at 17:10
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11 Answers 11

It's everything here and in general, everything that Jean Meeus has written.

alt text

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Nice! Didn't even know this existed. Many of the other books are expensive monographs. –  Ade Miller Feb 2 '10 at 21:20
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You need to know and understand Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation and Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion. These two are simple and I'm sure you've heard about them, if not studied them in high school. Finally, if you want your simulator to be as accurate as possible, you should familiarize yourself with the n-Body problem.

You should start out simple. Try making a Sun object and an Earth object that revolves around it. That should give you a very solid start and it's fairly easy to expand from there. A planet object would look something like:

Class Planet {
  float x;
  float y;
  float z; // If you want to work in 3D
  double velocity;
  int mass;
}

Just remember that F = MA and the rest just just boring math :P

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3  
Yuo probably want to consider polar coordinates. They're often easier when it comes to orbital mechanics. –  MSalters Feb 2 '10 at 8:46
1  
True, but you'll have to plot the planets on screen (I assume), so might as well do the initial calculations on a Cartesian plane. –  David Titarenco Feb 2 '10 at 8:51
    
Converting between Cartesian and polar coordinates is trivial, so do the calculations in whatever is more convenient and convert as necessary. –  David Thornley Feb 22 '10 at 19:44
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This is a great tutorial on N-body problems in general.

http://www.artcompsci.org/#msa

It's written using Ruby but pretty easy to map into other languages etc. It covers some of the common integration approaches; Forward-Euler, Leapfrog and Hermite.

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You might want to take a look at Celestia, a free space simulator. I believe that you can use it to create fictitious solar systems and it is open source.

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All you need to implement is proper differential equation (Keplers law) and using Runge-Kutta. (at lest this worked for me, but there are probably better methods)

There are loads of such simulators online.

Here is one simple one implemented in 500lines of c code. (montion algorhitm is much less) http://astro.berkeley.edu/~dperley/programs/ssms.html.

Also check this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kepler_problem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-body_problem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N-body_problem

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4  
Do not use Runge-Kutta (RK4)!. Use Velocity Verlet (or a higher-order symplectic method, such as Lobatto IIIA-IIIB) instead. RK4 is higher order but lacks the structure preserving properties of the latter, and using it will result in your planets eventually drifting out to space or crashing into the sun. –  user168715 Feb 2 '10 at 21:39
    
You should post an answer as well mr. unknown! –  Gaius Feb 3 '10 at 7:30
    
Well in high school we checked few numerical derivation methods. Leapfrog (Velocity Verlet) had property that it did not preserve energy. (Differential equation was actually Keplers law). From what i have checked, Runge - Kutta preserved energy (other methods had so called energy drift) and I implemented aprox 5 methods and if somebody wants to see my first programming attempts there should be still some matlab files somewhere on my backup. –  Luka Rahne Feb 3 '10 at 8:08
    
This seems to be at variance with wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leapfrog_integration): The second strength of Leapfrog integration is its symplectic nature, which implies that it conserves the (slightly modified) energy of dynamical systems. This is especially useful when computing orbital dynamics, as other integration schemes, such as the Runge-Kutta method, do not conserve energy and allow the system to drift substantially over time. Do you have a reference? –  Dominic Steinitz Mar 14 '13 at 10:37
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Check out nMod, a n-body modeling toolkit written in C++ and using OpenGL. It has a pretty well populated solar system model that comes with it and it should be easy to modify. Also, he has a pretty good wiki about n-body simulation in general. The same guy who created this is also making a new program called Moody, but it doesn't appear to be as far along.

In addition, if you are going to do n-body simulations with more than just a few objects, you should really look at the fast multipole method (also called the fast multipole algorithm). It can the reduce number of computations from O(N^2) to O(N) to really speed up your simulation. It is also one of the top ten most successful algorithms of the 20th century, according to the author of this article.

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In physics this is known as the N-Body Problem. It is famous because you can not solve this by hand for a system with more than three planets. Luckily, you can get approximate solutions with a computer very easily.

A nice paper on writing this code from the ground up can be found here.

However, I feel a word of warning is important here. You may not get the results you expect. If you want to see how:

  1. the mass of a planet affects its orbital speed around the Sun, cool. You will see that.
  2. the different planets interact with each other, you will be bummed.

The problem is this.

Yeah, modern astronomers are concerned with how Saturn's mass changes the Earth's orbit around the Sun. But this is a VERY minor effect. If you are going to plot the path of a planet around the Sun, it will hardly matter that there are other planets in the Solar System. The Sun is so big it will drown out all other gravity. The only exceptions to this are:

  1. If your planets have very elliptical orbits. This will cause the planets to potentially get closer together, so they interact more.
  2. If your planets are almost the exact same distance from the Sun. They will interact more.
  3. If you make your planets so comically large they compete with the Sun for gravity in the outer Solar System.

To be clear, yes, you will be able to calculate some interactions between planets. But no, these interactions will not be significant to the naked eye if you create a realistic Solar System.

Try it though, and find out!

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If you're simulating physics, I highly recommend Box2D.
It's a great physics simulator, and will really cut down the amount of boiler plate you'll need, with physics simulating.

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Box2D does not have an N-body solver or that-a-like. It assumes a constant gravity potential (at least as of November 2013). –  Domi Nov 30 '13 at 13:19
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Fundamentals of Astrodynamics by Bate, Muller, and White is still required reading at my alma mater for undergrad Aerospace engineers. This tends to cover the orbital mechanics of bodies in Earth orbit...but that is likely the level of physics and math you will need to start your understanding.

+1 for @Stefano Borini's suggestion for "everything that Jean Meeus has written."

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dig through Bob Jenkins' wonderful physics and math pages. You'll need some working familiarity with calculus, but it does pretty much exactly what you ask.

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Dear Friend here is the graphics code that simulate solar system

Kindly refer through it

/*Arpana*/

#include<stdio.h>
#include<graphics.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<dos.h>
void main()
{
int i=0,j=260,k=30,l=150,m=90;
int n=230,o=10,p=280,q=220;
float pi=3.1424,a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,z;
int gd=DETECT,gm;
initgraph(&gd,&gm,"c:\tc\bgi");
outtextxy(0,10,"SOLAR SYSTEM-Appu");
outtextxy(500,10,"press any key...");
circle(320,240,20);               /* sun */
setfillstyle(1,4);
floodfill(320,240,15);
outtextxy(310,237,"sun");
circle(260,240,8);
setfillstyle(1,2);
floodfill(258,240,15);
floodfill(262,240,15);
outtextxy(240,220,"mercury");
circle(320,300,12);
setfillstyle(1,1);
floodfill(320,298,15);
floodfill(320,302,15);
outtextxy(335,300,"venus");
circle(320,160,10);
setfillstyle(1,5);
floodfill(320,161,15);
floodfill(320,159,15);
outtextxy(332,150, "earth");
circle(453,300,11);
setfillstyle(1,6);
floodfill(445,300,15);
floodfill(448,309,15);
outtextxy(458,280,"mars");
circle(520,240,14);
setfillstyle(1,7);
floodfill(519,240,15);
floodfill(521,240,15);
outtextxy(500,257,"jupiter");
circle(169,122,12);
setfillstyle(1,12);
floodfill(159,125,15);
floodfill(175,125,15);
outtextxy(130,137,"saturn");
circle(320,420,9);
setfillstyle(1,13);
floodfill(320,417,15);
floodfill(320,423,15);
outtextxy(310,400,"urenus");
circle(40,240,9);
setfillstyle(1,10);
floodfill(38,240,15);
floodfill(42,240,15);
outtextxy(25,220,"neptune");
circle(150,420,7);
setfillstyle(1,14);
floodfill(150,419,15);
floodfill(149,422,15);
outtextxy(120,430,"pluto");
getch();
while(!kbhit())             /*animation*/
{
a=(pi/180)*i;
b=(pi/180)*j;
c=(pi/180)*k;
d=(pi/180)*l;
e=(pi/180)*m;
f=(pi/180)*n;
g=(pi/180)*o;
h=(pi/180)*p;
z=(pi/180)*q;
cleardevice();
circle(320,240,20);
setfillstyle(1,4);
floodfill(320,240,15);
outtextxy(310,237,"sun");

circle(320+60*sin(a),240-35*cos(a),8);
setfillstyle(1,2);
pieslice(320+60*sin(a),240-35*cos(a),0,360,8);
circle(320+100*sin(b),240-60*cos(b),12);
setfillstyle(1,1);
pieslice(320+100*sin(b),240-60*cos(b),0,360,12);
circle(320+130*sin(c),240-80*cos(c),10);
setfillstyle(1,5);
pieslice(320+130*sin(c),240-80*cos(c),0,360,10);
circle(320+170*sin(d),240-100*cos(d),11);
setfillstyle(1,6);
pieslice(320+170*sin(d),240-100*cos(d),0,360,11);
circle(320+200*sin(e),240-130*cos(e),14);
setfillstyle(1,7);
pieslice(320+200*sin(e),240-130*cos(e),0,360,14);
circle(320+230*sin(f),240-155*cos(f),12);
setfillstyle(1,12);
pieslice(320+230*sin(f),240-155*cos(f),0,360,12);
circle(320+260*sin(g),240-180*cos(g),9);
setfillstyle(1,13);
pieslice(320+260*sin(g),240-180*cos(g),0,360,9);
circle(320+280*sin(h),240-200*cos(h),9);
setfillstyle(1,10);
pieslice(320+280*sin(h),240-200*cos(h),0,360,9);
circle(320+300*sin(z),240-220*cos(z),7);
setfillstyle(1,14);
pieslice(320+300*sin(z),240-220*cos(z),0,360,7);
delay(20);
i++;
j++;
k++;
l++;
m++;
n++;
o++;
p++;
q+=2;
}
getch();
}
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