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Is it possible to set the src attribute value in CSS. At present what i am doing is:-

<img src="pathTo/myImage.jpg"/>

and i want it to be something like this

<img class="myClass" />

also, i don't want to use the background or background-image: property.

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1  
This is apparently going to be possible in CSS3: w3.org/TR/css3-values/#attribute –  graphicdivine Feb 2 '10 at 11:53
6  
It is now possible. Tested on Chrome / Safari / Opera: stackoverflow.com/a/11484688/632951 –  Pacerier Jul 14 '12 at 14:52
    
But FireFox 30.0, Internet Explorer 11.0 doesn't support –  Laxmikant Dange Oct 10 at 14:11

19 Answers 19

up vote 292 down vote accepted

Use content:url("image.jpg").

Full working solution (Live Demo):

<!doctype html>

<style>
.MyClass123{
    content:url("http://imgur.com/SZ8Cm.jpg");
}
</style>

<img class="MyClass123"/>

Tested and working:

  • Chrome 14.0.835.163
  • Safari 4.0.5
  • Opera 10.6

Tested and Not working:

  • FireFox 33.0.2
  • Internet Explorer 11.0
share|improve this answer
11  
Not working in IE10. –  gotqn Jan 10 '13 at 12:22
6  
@gotqn, only Chrome Safari Opera so far. –  Pacerier Jan 10 '13 at 13:39
20  
not browser compatible at all, I wonder why this satisfies people. (its simplicity I guess, I should ask why people dont care/think about compatibility all of a sudden) –  EricG Feb 22 '13 at 9:32
12  
@EricG, different applications have different requirements. If it doesn't suit your requirements, don't use it. If it does, use it. –  Pacerier Feb 22 '13 at 12:17
4  
Worth to add that even in browsers that support assigning content to img, it changes its behavior. The image starts to ignore size attributes, and in Chrome/Safari it loses the context menu options like 'Save image'. This is because assigning a content effectively converts img from empty replaced element to something like <span><img></span>. –  Ilya Streltsyn Jul 14 '13 at 22:55

There is a solution that I found out today (works in IE6+, FF, Opera, Chrome):

<img src='willbehidden.png' style="width:0px; height:0px; padding: 8px; background: url(newimage.png);">

How it works:

  • The image is shrunk until no longer visible by the width & height.
  • Then, you need to 'reset' the image size; there I use padding (this one gives a 16x16 image, of course you can use padding-left / padding-top to make rectangular images)
  • Finally, the new image is put there using background

It also works for submit-input-images, they stay clickable.

See live demo: http://www.audenaerde.org/csstricks.html#imagereplacecss

Enjoy!

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5  
@RobAnu: This works quite well - jsfiddle –  TimPietrusky May 29 '12 at 9:26
4  
Got to hand it to you that this is fascinating and clever, but an empty DIV is more straight-forward. –  Volomike Jul 10 '12 at 22:46
8  
In this case it is. There are cases however, where you cannot control the HTML and want to manipulate the IMG nonetheless. There this solution will also work –  RobAu Jul 11 '12 at 9:41
2  
If the image has a src attribute, this is the technique you need. +1 - helped me a lot –  James Long Jun 21 '13 at 7:53
2  
Not ranking on this answer, which might be the solution for some applications, but this method has a limitation. You have no control over the dimensions of the rendering of the image file. In normal use, you can control the height-width of an image, if the file is specified in the source. But this is basically no different from a div with a background image, where if your div is bigger than the image, you're out of luck. –  Gregory Lewis Nov 25 '13 at 18:28

i used the empty div solution, with this CSS:

#throbber {
    background-image: url(/Content/pictures/ajax-loader.gif);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    width: 48px;
    height: 48px;
    min-width: 48px;
    min-height: 48px;
}

HTML:

<div id="throbber"></div>
share|improve this answer
    
This solution would work but poor semantics –  Timo Nov 13 '13 at 14:41
    
What if I want to display it inline? Adding "display: inline" gives my div dimension of 0x0... –  elsurudo Feb 4 at 10:28
1  
@elsurudo Use display:inline-block if you want to set a width and height on an inline element –  Erin Drummond Mar 19 at 22:13
1  
The top answer doesn't work with Firefox, so I like your answer more! And it is clear and have no css hacks. –  Sergey Bogdanov May 24 at 14:50

They are right. IMG is a content element and CSS is about design. But, how about when you use some content elements or properties for design purposes? I have IMG across my web pages that must change if i change the style (the CSS).

Well this is a solution for defining IMG presentation (no really the image) in CSS style.

  1. create a 1x1 transparent gif or png.
  2. Assign propery "src" of IMG to that image.
  3. Define final presentation with "background-image" in the CSS style.

It works like a charm :)

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5  
-1 Even though your answer isn't bad, he specifically mentions that he doesn't want to use background* –  x3ro Aug 11 '11 at 22:17
1  
I like new ideas =) –  Pacerier Jul 14 '12 at 15:13

I found a better way than the proposed solutions, but it does use the background-image indeed. Compliant method (cannot confirm for IE6) Credits: http://www.kryogenix.org/code/browser/lir/

<img src="pathTo/myImage.jpg"/>

The CSS:

img[src*="pathTo/myImage.jpg"] {

    background-image: url("mynewimg.jpg"); /* lets say 20x20 */
    width: 20px;

    display:inline-block;
    padding: 20px 0 0 0;
    height: 0px !important;

    /* for IE 5.5's bad box model */
    height /**/:20px;
}

The old image is not seen and the new is seen as expected.


The following neat solution only works for webkit

img[src*="pathTo/myImage.jpg"] {

    /* note :) */
    content:'';
    display:inline-block;

    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background-image: url("mynewimg.jpg"); /* lets say 20x20 */

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a neat trick, but is it really standards compliant? The W3C page says the content property only applies to the :before and :after pseudo classes. Also, if you have to support IE7 or earlier, I think content support is non-existent. Still, very tempting. –  jatrim Jun 1 '12 at 18:15
    
You are right, I just found a more compliant method. Updating my post! Now vote me up ;) Haha. –  EricG Jun 4 '12 at 8:38
    
The updated approach is definitely better than the one relying on content. Thanks for including the original link. That was insightful. You'll note that @RobAu's answer is actually very similar to your updated version as well. –  jatrim Jun 4 '12 at 15:39
    
@jatrim The content property applies to all elements. http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-content/#content –  XP1 May 2 '13 at 16:32

You can define 2 images in your HTML code and use display: none; to decide which one will be visible.

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Worked for me thank you. –  jackdh Oct 24 '13 at 17:39

As far as I am aware of, YOU CANNOT. CSS is about style and image's src is content.

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3  
Nowadays, quite often images are there just to style up the page. –  Lorenzo Polidori Aug 8 '12 at 9:34
2  
The implication is that there may be a difference between images used as borders, backgrounds etc. and those that are actually part of the page content ie. diagrams, article photos etc. –  Rhys van der Waerden Mar 3 at 0:39
    
YOU CAN, and there are common, valid cases where you would want to. –  ryan0 7 hours ago

Here is a very good solution -> http://css-tricks.com/replace-the-image-in-an-img-with-css/

Pro(s) and Con(s):
(+) works with vector image that have relative width/height (a thing that RobAu's answer does not handle)
(+) is cross browser (works also for IE8+)
(+) it only uses CSS. So no need to modify the img src (or if you do not have access/do not want to change the already existing img src attribute).
(-) sorry, it does use the background css attribute :)

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No you can't set the image src attribute via CSS. The closest you can get is, as you say, background or background-image. I wouldn't recommend doing that anyway as it would be somewhat illogical.

However, there is a CSS3 solution available to you, if the browsers you're targeting are able to use it. Use content:url as described in Pacerier's answer. You can find other, cross-browser solutions in the other answers below.

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why the down vote? this answer is more accurate than the accepted answer. –  Pathachiever11 Apr 16 at 23:09
    
The best answer so far : NO, you can't do it with CSS. –  Milky ways patterns Sep 23 at 13:39

To reiterate a prior solution and to stress the pure CSS implementation here is my answer.

A Pure CSS solution is needed in cases where you are sourcing content from another site, and thus you have no control over the HTML that is delivered. In my case I am trying to remove branding of licensed source content so that the licencee does not have to advertise for the company they are buying the content from. Therefore, I'm removing their logo while keeping everything else. I should note that this is within my client's contract to do so.

{ /* image size is 204x30 */
     width:0;
     height:0;
     padding-left:102px;
     padding-right:102px;
     padding-top:15px;
     padding-bottom:15px;
     background-image:url(http://sthstest/Style%20Library/StThomas/images/rhn_nav_logo2.gif);
}
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Alternative way

.myClass {
background: url('/img/loading_big.gif');
}
<div class="myClass"></div>
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I know this is a really old question however no answers provide the proper reasoning for why this can never be done. While you can "do" what you are looking for you cannot do it in a valid way. In order to have a valid img tag it must have the src and alt attributes.

So any of the answers giving a way to do this with an img tag that does not use the src attribute are promoting use of invalid code.

In short: what you are looking for cannot be done legally within the structure of the syntax.

Source: W3 Validator

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If you don't want to set a background property then you can't set the src attribute of an image using only CSS.

Alternatively you can use JavaScript to do such a thing.

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Using CSS, it can't be done. But, if you are using JQuery, something like this will do the trick:

$("img.myClass").attr("src", "http://somwhere");
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If you are trying to add an image in a button dynamically based on the context of your project, you can use the ? take to reference the source based on an outcome. Here I am using mvvm design to let my Model.Phases[0] value determine whether I want my button to be populated with images of a lightbulb on or off based on the value of the light phase.

Not sure if this helps. I'm using JqueryUI, Blueprint, and CSS. The class definition should allow you to style the button based on whatever you'd like.

    <button>                           
  <img class="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "light-on": "light-off")" src="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "~/Images/LightBulbOn.png" : "~/Images/LightBulbOff.png")"/>                             
  <img class="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "light-on": "light-off")" src="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "~/Images/LightBulbOn.png" : "~/Images/LightBulbOff.png")"/>   
  <img class="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "light-on": "light-off")" src="@(Model.Phases[0] ? "~/Images/LightBulbOn.png" : "~/Images/LightBulbOff.png")"/>     

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I would add this: background image could be also positioned with background-position: x y; (x horizontal y vertical). (..) My case, CSS:

(..) 
#header {
  height: 100px; 
  background-image: url(http://.../head6.jpg); 
  background-position: center; 
  background-repeat: no-repeat; 
  background-color: grey; 
  (..)
} 
(...)
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HTMl Code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
     <head>
         <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="css destination" />
     </head>
     <body>
<!-- click-able pic with link -->
           <a href="site you want"> 
<!-- Take the off if you don't want click-able link -->
                <h1 id(or class)="nameOfClassorid">
                     <span>Text that is not important</span>
                </h1>
           </a>
      </body>
 </html>

Css Code:

span {
     display: none;
}
h1 id or class {
     height: of pic;
     width: of pic;
/* Only flaw (so far) read bottom */
     background-image:url(/* "image destination" */);
}
h1 id or class:hover {
/* Now the awesome part */
     background-image:url(/* 'new background!!!' */);
}

I've been studying html after school for a few days, and wanted to know how to do this. Found out the background and then put 2 and 2 together. This works 100% I checked, if not make sure you fill in necessary things!!! We need to specify height, because without it there would be nothing!!! I'll leave this basic shell you can add-on.

Example:

 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html>
     <head>
         <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
     </head>
     <body>
           <a href="http:localhost"> 
                <h1>
                     <span>Text that is not important</span>
                </h1>
           </a>
     </body>
 </html>
span {
     display: none;
}
h1 {
     height: 100px;
     width: 100px;
     background-image:url("http://linuxlog.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Ubuntu-Desktop-@-2011-01-11-191526-300x225.png");
}

h1:hover {
     height: 300px;
     width: 300px;
     background-image:url("http://cdn.css-tricks.com/images/ads/wufoo-600x600-red.png");
}

P.S. Yes I am a Linux user ;)

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Put several images in a "controlling" container, and change the container's class instead. In CSS, add rules to manage images' visibility depending on the container's class. This will produce the same effect as changing img src property of a a single image.

HTML:

<span id="light" class="red">
    <img class="red" src="red.png" />
    <img class="yellow" src="yellow.png" />
    <img class="green" src="green.png" />
</span>

CSS:

#light         { ... }
#light         *        { display: none; }     // all images are hidden
#light.red     .red     { display: inline; }   // show red image when #light is red
#light.yellow  .yellow  { display: inline; }   // .. or yellow
#light.green   .green   { display: inline; }   // .. or green

Note that it will preload all images, like with CSS backround-images, but unlike changing img src via JS.

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Any method based on background or background-image is likely to fail when user prints the document with "print background colors and images" disabled. Which is unfortunately typical browser's default.

The only print-friendly and cross-browser compatible method here is the one proposed by Bronx.

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