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I apologise if this is deemed off-topic, though I hope design of a data structure is sufficiently relevant to programming practice to be posted here.

I am learning C and C++, and having already covered arrays and allocation of memory, we began to look at linked lists. The lecturer stated their advantages as mainly being the ability to add/remove nodes without copying the entire structure - I can see that in order to add a node to an array, we need existing_array_size + node_size of free memory, despite the fact that we will then delete an entire existing_array_size. Even to delete an entry, we probably want to copy the whole structure out again.

With a linked list, we pay the price of execution time (in traversing potentially n nodes just to find and delete one) for the benefit of being more efficient with memory.

val of ll0
ptr to ll1
...
val of ll1
ptr to ll2
...
...
val of lln
null ptr

All well and good. However, what jumps to my mind (probably due to being completely new to it and not understanding properly, forgive me) is that we waste a lot of memory for n+1 pointrs (I anticipate bickering about whether this is really a 'waste'.. it's necessary for the method but contains nothing of actual value).

The structure that seemed more obvious to me especially for unordered lists is as follows, take a ptr to start:

(start) ptr to end
val of 0
val of 1
...
val of n
(end) null ptr

So far this just seems like an array.. let's delete a value:

(start) ptr to end
val of 0
val of 1
...
(deleted0) val of m (= null)
...
val of n
(end) ptr to deleted0

Now insert a value x:

(start) ptr to end
val of 0
val of 1
...
val of m (= x)
...
val of n
(end) null ptr

An issue I now see only as I type it out, is what to do if we need to insert with no deletions, or even have to keep multiple pointers to deletions which would extend 'below' end, we cannot be allowed to overwrite some other item in memory if it is there.

Well in that instance, why not behave like a linked list, with this whole structure as a 'node'? Delete 2 items:

(start) ptr to end
val of 0
val of 1
...
val of m (= x)
...
(deleted0) val of a (= null)
...
(deleted1) val of b (= null)
...
val of n
(end) ptr to start1
...
...
(start1) ptr to end1
(end1) ptr to deleted0
ptr to deleted1

Okay, so suppose we now have some gaps due to deletion but nothing to insert. Maybe we want to spring clean a bit, it would be reasonably simple to 'shrink' by filling in the start1 structure from start2, etc. With spaces in start(0) I suppose we would have no choice but to copy it out again.

Note here that end is not the 'end', but rather the end of values, to where we look for pointers to free space inside the structure.

  • This has the same advantage over arrays as linked lists in saving us from making a copy on insert/delete.
  • 'Free' space inside is not freed to other variables, but we can consider this a cost of the structure, comparable to (but far less in magnitude in all but the worst case* than linked lists)
  • Insertion takes just as few instructions as in a linked list.
  • Deletion takes one fewer than an ll.
  • Size in memory greater than that of array, but lesser than a linked list*.
  • Never copied entirely, maximum space required tends to n for large n, and is also proportional to num_insertions/num_deletions

*'worst case' is when every other element is deleted, and we essentially have a linked list with all the pointers at the end.

You may not have bothered to read this far before beginning to angrily type:

So what is my question?!

Simple: What is wrong with this idea (unless of course, it/something very similar is used, in which case - what's it called?) - is it simply that it is always clear whether we want speed of insertion/deletion or to save usual space in memory, so this is redundant?

Thanks, and sorry for the long post, I felt it needed several examples to be clear.

share|improve this question
    
A simple linked list is simple and straightforward. The mechanics are repeatable with few decisions needed. What you are describing seems overly complicated with many decision points and places for errors. –  Richard Chambers Feb 17 '14 at 14:05
    
First of all, there is no language called "C/C++". The modern languages can be very different. On the other hand, your question does not really pertain to either language specifically (i.e. it could apply to Objective-C or other languages). In this case, the algorithm tag might be more appropriate than language tags. –  crashmstr Feb 17 '14 at 14:05
    
@crashmstr I'm well aware. We've covered/are covering both. I'll remove tags if they're not relevant. –  Ollie Ford Feb 17 '14 at 14:07
    
Note that one common set of nodes can be used as part of a messaging system between multiple threads, with each thread having it's own pointer to the first node of the list for that thread (or null if no pending messages). In the case of just two threads, and messages that always remain in fifo order for each thread, then a circular array could be used instead. –  rcgldr Feb 17 '14 at 14:08
    
@RichardChambers Is strightforwardness a worthwhile aim? If I were suggesting this, I'd give you a handful of functions in order to accomplish insert/delete/etc. You only have to handle lack of simplicity once. –  Ollie Ford Feb 17 '14 at 14:09

1 Answer 1

First, bare in mind that we have different structures because we have different requirements. Your data structure may be quite suitable for some application, but it can certainly not be suitable as a generic replacement for linked-lists.

Here are three examples where the data structure fails to replace linked-lists:

Insertions in the middle

You focus on deletion, which is easy since you just mark the spot as deleted (which is by the way not always possible. Your data structure may not necessarily be storing pointers so that you could use NULL as a marker).

However, what would you do if the array is full, and you need to insert in the middle of it? You would then be forced to shift all the contents of the array (left or right to the nearest hole, or the end of the array if full), which is very costly.

Act as FIFO

Think of what happens to your structure if you use it as a queue. You would continuously insert in the end (i.e. enlarge the array with realloc) and mark as deleted from the beginning. Effectively, your array strictly grows in size, i.e. is doomed to fail.

Shared nodes

A good thing about linked-lists is that no matter how the actual links change, the data is persistent in the same memory location. Imagine someone has a reference to the data of a node in the list (i.e. a pointer to the data of the node). If you store those data in an array, then any shift of data (inevitable with insertion) would invalidate those pointers. However, with a linked list, the data address remains constant, no matter what and where you insert to or delete from the linked list (unless of course you delete that particular node!)

share|improve this answer
    
"Shared nodes": It might also be practical to have a node be part of multiple lists (or even more complex datastructures). –  PlasmaHH Feb 17 '14 at 14:26
    
@PlasmaHH, sure. One nice example is an intermixed set and list, where lookup is O(log(n)) and finding the next element is O(1) (not just amortized O(1)). Although this is often done with a threaded tree, this still has its uses. –  Shahbaz Feb 17 '14 at 14:30
    
Similar to the internals of most std::unordered_* container implementations. –  PlasmaHH Feb 17 '14 at 14:33
    
Thank you for the feedback - to clear some misunderstandings though: Reqs) I appreciate that - I did end by asking if the reason was that we would always favour one or the other. Deletions) I don't use null as a marker, I mark it by pointing to it at the end. Insertions) This is true - I sort of assumed it was unordered, though it would be no more expensive here than an array. Shared nodes) This is also true of my suggestion/question example, except when inserting in the middle which as I said I assumed wouldn't be done as unordered. –  Ollie Ford Feb 17 '14 at 16:53
    
@OllieFord, assuming there would be no insertions in the middle is kind of a big assumption ;) –  Shahbaz Feb 17 '14 at 18:38

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