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I found something in the DMD behavior that I don't understand.

My code looks like this:

class C1 {
    private static fun(alias f)() {
        ;
    }
    public static void run() {
        auto f = delegate bool(int x) {return true;} ;
        fun!(f)();
        return;
    }
}

And compiler writes an error:

Error: template instance fun!(f) cannot use local 'f' as parameter to non-global template fun(alias f)()

So I have to create a delegate field in class to make it global:

class C1 {
    private static fun(alias f)() {
        ;
    }
    private static bool delegate(int) f;
    public static void run() {
        f = delegate bool(int x) {return true;} ;
        fun!(f)();
        return;
    }
}

This code is compiled without errors. But I don't understand, why can't we declare the delegate inside of the method?

share|improve this question
    
What's your goal? I think there may be better ways of doing it. Basically 'f' is a mutable, local pointer to a delegate (and the delegate itself has a context pointer), so you can't pass it as a template param -- those must be known at compile time. –  J. Miller Feb 19 '14 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update: This issue is not as simple as I originally thought. Here's what I think is really going on. As pointed out by another commenter, I was forgetting that alias template parameters allow any kind of symbol to be passed in, even local variables. In a case like this, with a function template, the instantiated template needs a pointer to its context (the body of run) so it can access those local variables (like the delegate f) passed in as alias params. However, fun is already a static member of a class, which means it already has a context pointer (the static class context). Now, it is a known limitation of the D compiler that it cannot handle delegates needing two or more context pointers. (That's why it says 'non-global' in the error message -- global function templates work since they don't have a context.)

The second example works because f is no longer a local variable; it is a static member. The fact that it is initialized in the scope of run doesn't change that.

See the following issues:

Hopefully someone with more inside knowledge of the compiler can confirm this diagnosis.

Original answer

(My original answer explained this error by saying that the template param needed to be immutable and known at compile time as well as not being a delegate (plain function instead). This was only half-right ... alias params don't need to have values known at compile time. However, the part about it needing to be a regular function and not a delegate was correct.)

These workarounds from my original answer still apply:

Declaring f in one of these ways will ensure it can be passed as a template param:

// Not a delegate, not a local variable anymore (enum)
enum f = function bool(int x) {return true;};

// "static" == not delegate
static bool f(int x) { return true; }
fun!(f)();

// Or pass it as a literal (inferred to be non-delegate)
fun!((int x) => true);

Regular methods can be passed as template params:

class C2 {
    private static fun(alias f)() {
        assert(f(1) == true);
    }
    private static bool g(int) { 
        return true; 
    }
    public static void run() {
        fun!(g)();
    }
}

Or pass it as a regular param, not a template param:

class C1 {
    private static fun(bool delegate(int) f) {
        assert(f(1) == true);
    }
    public static void run() {
        auto f = delegate bool(int x) { return true; };
        fun(f);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Answering to your question about the goal: I had a basic private method to get the array of structures. And I wanted to have a group of public methods, based on private method, but filtering the array in some way. Then I got the idea to make the filter-function the member of private method. Then I tried to make this filter function dependent on incoming values of public methods. This seemed to me a good idea. –  Timushev Roman Feb 21 '14 at 19:29
    
Yes! It should be passed like a regular parameter. That's an answer I searched. –  Timushev Roman Feb 21 '14 at 19:53
    
I changed my opinion on what's really going on with this error. See updated answer –  J. Miller Feb 23 '14 at 8:01

I don't have an answer, but here are some thoughts which don't fit well in a comment.

Error: template instance fun!(f) cannot use local 'f' as parameter to non-global template fun(alias f)()

You'll notice that there are actually two ways to resolve this problem. Either turn 'f' into a non-local variable, as you did. Or make the template global.

This suggests that there is some difficulty in instantiating a local template to a local variable. I'm guessing this means it is a technical/implementation challenge rather than a practical restriction (i.e. don't do it because...).

Update: What J. Miller isn't realizing is that an alias parameter binds to a symbol not to a value. In your case the symbol f is known at compile time and thus this code does work:

class C1 {
    public static void run() {
        auto f = delegate bool(int x) {return true;} ;
        fun!(f)();
        return;
    }
}

private void fun(alias f)() {
    import std.stdio;
    writeln(f(3));
}

void main () {
    new C1;
    C1.run();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right about alias template params. This is not as simple as I thought at first. I will update my answer... Thanks. –  J. Miller Feb 23 '14 at 7:41

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