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I'd like to have loglevel TRACE (5) for my application, as I don't think that debug() is sufficient. Additionally log(5, msg) isn't what I want. How can I add a custom loglevel to a Python logger?

I've a mylogger.py with the following content:

import logging

@property
def log(obj):
    myLogger = logging.getLogger(obj.__class__.__name__)
    return myLogger

In my code I use it in the following way:

class ExampleClass(object):
    from mylogger import log

    def __init__(self):
        '''The constructor with the logger'''
        self.log.debug("Init runs")

Now I'd like to call self.log.trace("foo bar")

Thanks in advance for your help.

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10 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you'll have to subclass the Logger class and add a method called trace which basically calls Logger.log with a level lower than DEBUG. I haven't tried this but this is what the docs indicate.

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1  
And you'll probably want to replace logging.getLogger to return your subclass instead of the built-in class. –  S.Lott Feb 2 '10 at 11:38
    
ok, do you have any other best practices for logging? –  tuergeist Feb 2 '10 at 13:15
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I took the "avoid seeing lambda" answer and had to modify where the log_at_my_log_level was being added. I too saw the problem that Paul did "I don't think this works. Don't you need logger as the first arg in log_at_my_log_level?" This worked for me

import logging
DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM = 9 
logging.addLevelName(DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM, "DEBUGV")
def debugv(self, message, *args, **kws):
    # Yes, logger takes its '*args' as 'args'.
    self._log(DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM, message, args, **kws) 
logging.Logger.debugv = debugv
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+1. This is the proper answer. –  Macke Sep 24 '12 at 9:48
2  
+1 too. An elegant approach, and it worked perfectly. An important note: You only need to do this once, in a single module, and it will work for all modules. You don't even have to import the "setup" module. So toss this in a package's __init__.py and be happy :D –  MestreLion Sep 28 '12 at 18:01
2  
@Eric S. You should take a look at this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/13638084/600110 –  Sam Mussmann Nov 30 '12 at 2:20
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@Eric S.

Eric S.'s answer is excellent, but I learned by experimentation that this will always cause messages logged at the new debug level to be printed -- regardless of what the log level is set to. So if you make a new level number of 9, if you call setLevel(50), the lower level messages will erroneously be printed. To prevent that from happening, you need another line inside the "debugv" function to check if the logging level in question is actually enabled.

Fixed example that checks if the logging level is enabled:

import logging
DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM = 9 
logging.addLevelName(DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM, "DEBUGV")
def debugv(self, message, *args, **kws):
    # Yes, logger takes its '*args' as 'args'.
    if self.isEnabledFor(DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM):
        self._log(DEBUG_LEVELV_NUM, message, args, **kws) 
logging.Logger.debugv = debugv

If you look at the code for class Logger in logging.__init__.py for Python 2.7, this is what all the standard log functions do (.critical, .debug, etc.).

I apparently can't post replies to others' answers for lack of reputation... hopefully Eric will update his post if he sees this. =)

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Who started the bad practice of using internal methods (self._log) and why is each answer based on that?! The pythonic solution would be to use self.log instead so you don't have to mess with any internal stuff:

import logging

SUBDEBUG = 5
logging.addLevelName(SUBDEBUG, 'SUBDEBUG')

def subdebug(self, message, *args, **kws):
    self.log(SUBDEBUG, message, *args, **kws) 
logging.Logger.subdebug = subdebug

logging.basicConfig()
l = logging.getLogger()
l.setLevel(SUBDEBUG)
l.subdebug('test')
l.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
l.subdebug('test')
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5  
Using _log() instead of log() is needed to avoid introducing an extra level in the call stack. If log() is used, the introduction of the extra stack frame causes several LogRecord attributes (funcName, lineno, filename, pathname, ...) to point at the debug function instead of the actual caller. This is likely not the desired result. –  Roy Feb 16 at 17:03
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I find it easier to create a new attribute for the logger object that passes the log() function. I think the logger module provides the addLevelName() and the log() for this very reason. Thus no subclasses or new method needed.

import logging

@property
def log(obj):
    logging.addLevelName(5, 'TRACE')
    myLogger = logging.getLogger(obj.__class__.__name__)
    setattr(myLogger, 'trace', lambda *args: myLogger.log(5, *args))
    return myLogger

now

mylogger.trace('This is a trace message')

should work as expected.

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Wouldn't this have a small performance hit versus subclassing? With this approach, each time some asks for a logger, they'll have to make the setattr call. You'd probably wrap these together in a custom class but nonetheless, that setattr has to be called on every logger created, right? –  Matthew Lund Feb 14 '12 at 23:49
    
@Zbigniew below indicated this didn't work, which I think is because your logger needs to make its call to _log, not log. –  marqueed Mar 3 '12 at 1:30
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In my experience, this is the full solution the the op's problem... to avoid seeing "lambda" as the function in which the message is emitted, go deeper:

MY_LEVEL_NUM = 25
logging.addLevelName(MY_LEVEL_NUM, "MY_LEVEL_NAME")
def log_at_my_log_level(self, message, *args, **kws):
    # Yes, logger takes its '*args' as 'args'.
    self._log(MY_LEVEL_NUM, message, args, **kws)
logger.log_at_my_log_level = log_at_my_log_level

I've never tried working with a standalone logger class, but I think the basic idea is the same (use _log).

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I don't think this works. Don't you need logger as the first arg in log_at_my_log_level? –  Paul Nov 9 '11 at 0:15
    
Yes, I think you probably would. This answer was adapted from code that solves a slightly different problem. –  marqueed Nov 10 '11 at 1:33
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This worked for me:

import logging
logging.basicConfig(
    format='  %(levelname)-8.8s %(funcName)s: %(message)s',
)
logging.NOTE = 32  # positive yet important
logging.addLevelName(logging.NOTE, 'NOTE')      # new level
logging.addLevelName(logging.CRITICAL, 'FATAL') # rename existing

log = logging.getLogger(__name__)
log.note = lambda msg, *args: log._log(logging.NOTE, msg, args)
log.note('school\'s out for summer! %s', 'dude')
log.fatal('file not found.')

The lambda/funcName issue is fixed with logger._log as @marqueed pointed out. I think using lambda looks a bit cleaner, but the drawback is that it can't take keyword arguments. I've never used that myself, so no biggie.

  NOTE     setup: school's out for summer! dude
  FATAL    setup: file not found.
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I tried this solution with setattr - it works, but when I display in my logfile the line number and method name, then lambda pcall is used as the caller instead of original .trace caller.

How can it display the correct frame information?

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See my answer, I think that should work. –  marqueed Sep 22 '11 at 6:01
    
I don't believe that it does. If you use '%(funcName)s' in the pattern and call myLogger.trace(...) it will show as 'log', regardless of which function you're in. This is really irritating, and I haven't found a way around it other than reimplementing those pattern variables. –  PAG Feb 17 '12 at 17:20
    
Hmmm... the solution I have definitely works in my situation (using funcName). Note that you need to make your call to _log, not log. –  marqueed Mar 3 '12 at 1:24
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As alternative to adding an extra method to the Logger class I would recommend using the Logger.log(level, msg) method.

import logging

TRACE = 5
logging.addLevelName(TRACE, 'TRACE')
FORMAT = '%(levelname)s:%(name)s:%(lineno)d:%(message)s'


logging.basicConfig(format=FORMAT)
l = logging.getLogger()
l.setLevel(TRACE)
l.log(TRACE, 'trace message')
l.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
l.log(TRACE, 'disabled trace message')
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This question is rather old, but I just dealt with the same topic and found a way similiar to those already mentioned which appears a little cleaner to me. This was tested on 3.4, so I'm not sure whether the methods used exist in older versions:

from logging import getLoggerClass, addLevelName, setLoggerClass, NOTSET

VERBOSE = 5

class MyLogger(getLoggerClass()):
    def __init__(self, name, level=NOTSET):
        super().__init__(name, level)

        addLevelName(VERBOSE, "VERBOSE")

    def verbose(self, msg, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.isEnabledFor(VERBOSE):
            self._log(VERBOSE, msg, args, **kwargs)

setLoggerClass(MyLogger)
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