Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: Figured it out using a subroutine and a whole lot of if statements. I've appended the working code to the bottom of the question (since it won't let me post an answer) in case someone comes across a similar issue, with the disclaimer that I'm a mega-novice and the code probably isn't good, just functional.

Thanks for the help, guys!

Original Question:

I'm currently banging my head against an assignment that requires we use the Win32::DriveInfo module to create a list of drives, followed by the drive type. Using an array, we have to take the supplied drive type number and convert it into a descriptive string.

I can get the program to return the appropriate drive type, the problem is converting those numbers into strings. The array is populated based on the drives it finds on the user's system, which means the program has to be able read the array, determine each number, and then (probably?) compare it against some kind of predetermined 'conversion chart' and convert the provided numbers to the appropriate string.

I've been at this for hours, and so far my best option seems like it might be the map function, although we haven't gone over that in class (and my teacher is not fond of googling) so I'm not entirely sure that's what we're supposed to use. And even so, the only information I've been able to find has either been completely over my head, or assumes that the contents of the array are static.

The entire program is longer, but here's the relevant code:

use Win32::DriveInfo;

my @DrivesInUse = Win32::DriveInfo::DrivesInUse();
my @DriveType;
my %DrivesHash;

foreach $DrivesInUse (@DrivesInUse)
{
  print "$DrivesInUse: ";
  push (@DriveType, Win32::DriveInfo::DriveType($DrivesInUse));

  foreach $DriveType (@DriveType)
  {
    $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} = $DriveType;
  }

  print $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} . "\n";
}

And the output is:

A: 2
C: 3
D: 5
E: 5
F: 5
G: 2

Now I just have to figure out a way to convert all potential numbers (0-6) to the appropriate strings and print those instead. We can't use any additional modules, and considering I'm still very much a newbie, the more basic the solution the better.

Edit:

For clarification, the numbers come from the Win32::DriveInfo module, and each of them represent a drive type, description from CPAN below:

   0     - the drive type cannot be determined.
   1     - the root directory does not exist.
   2     - the drive can be removed from the drive (removable).
   3     - the disk cannot be removed from the drive (fixed).
   4     - the drive is a remote (network) drive.
   5     - the drive is a CD-ROM drive.
   6     - the drive is a RAM disk.

In my program, I need those numbers to return as descriptive strings instead, so the desired output on my system would be something like:

A: Removable Drive
C: Fixed Drive
D: CD-ROM Drive
E: CD-ROM Drive
F: CD-ROM Drive
G: Removable Drive

My problem is I can't figure out how to convert the numbers in @DriveType to the corresponding strings, since the elements in @DriveType change depending on the system.

I hope that cleared things up?

Working Code

use Win32::SystemInfo;
use Win32::DriveInfo;

my @DrivesInUse = Win32::DriveInfo::DrivesInUse();
my @DriveType;
my %DrivesHash;

foreach $DrivesInUse (@DrivesInUse)
{
  print "$DrivesInUse: ";
  push (@DriveType, Win32::DriveInfo::DriveType($DrivesInUse));

  foreach $DriveType (@DriveType)
  {
    $DriveString = conversion($DriveType);
    $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} = $DriveString;
  }

  print $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} . "\n";
}

sub conversion
{
  if ($_[0] == 0)
  {
    $StringContent = "Undetermined";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 1)
  {
    $StringContent = "Does not exist";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 2)
  {
    $StringContent = "Removable";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 3)
  {
    $StringContent = "Fixed";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 4)
  {
    $StringContent = "Network";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 5)
  {
    $StringContent = "CD-ROM";
  }
    if ($_[0] == 6)
  {
    $StringContent = "RAM";
  }
  return $StringContent;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your question is unclear. What are the inputs, and what is the desired output? Please, provide a simple example. –  user4035 Feb 17 at 16:20
    
How about skipping lines you dont need? –  mpapec Feb 17 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I hope this may help you

use Win32::DriveInfo;

my @DrivesInUse = Win32::DriveInfo::DrivesInUse();
my %DriveType   = (
    '0' => 'Undetermined',
    '1' => 'Does not exist',
    '2' => 'Removable',
    '3' => 'Fixed',
    '4' => 'Network',
    '5' => 'CD-ROM',
    '6' => 'RAM',
);

for $DrivesInUse ( @DrivesInUse ) {
    print "$DrivesInUse: " 
        . $DriveType{ Win32::DriveInfo::DriveType($DrivesInUse) } . "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

One way to go could be a types hash like

my %typesHash;
$typesHash{0} = "the drive type cannot be determined.";
$typesHash{1} = "the root directory does not exist.";
.
.
.

edit: In an earlier version i had butchered these lines. Another way to assign the hash would be the following, i just tried to use the version above because i thought it would be clearer and consequently managed to make everything less clear. \o/

my %typesHash = (0 => "the drive type cannot be determined.",
                 1 => "the root directory does not exist.",
                 ...);

end edit

And later use

print $typesHash{$DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse}} . "\n";

Not necessarily the most elegant solution but a proper use for a hash.

edit: By the way:

push (@DriveType, Win32::DriveInfo::DriveType($DrivesInUse));

foreach $DriveType (@DriveType)
{
    $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} = $DriveType;
}

is a completely useless loop. It just assigns all the drive types encountered so far to $DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} one after the other. It does work because you pushed the most recent one into the array last and so it will end up with the correct one but there is no reason to assign all the others before. If you do not need the array of drive types (they are in the hash as well anyways), the whole stuff pasted above could be replaced with:

$DrivesHash{$DrivesInUse} = Win32::DriveInfo::DriveType($DrivesInUse);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! Unfortunately, the %typeHash[number] lines are returning a syntax error and I can't figure out why. I've included everything exactly as you have it. As for the second part, I knew there had to be a better way to accomplish the same result, so thanks for that. –  user3319503 Feb 17 at 16:53
    
That first example is gibberish, as far as perl's concerned. Maybe you mean $typesHash{0} = "..." ? –  Jim Davis Feb 17 at 23:05
    
Gah, of course i do, sorry. That's what i get for not testing answers. –  DeVadder Feb 18 at 7:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.