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Is it even possible to create an interface-only WCF service? My reason for this is that I don't want the server to have to be updated with a new DLL of DataContracts and/or KnownTypes every time a client comes up with a new concrete implementation - Is there a way to accomplish this, or is is even possible with WCF?

Example interfaces (exists on client and server):

[ServiceContract]
public interface IProcessingService
{
    [OperationContract]
    IResponse Process(IRequest request);
}

public interface IRequest { ... }

public interface IResponse { ... }

No implementations of IRequest would exist server-side, and IProcessingService/IResponse would only be implemented on the server side.

Example DataContract implementations (exists client-side only):

[DataContract]
internal class ProcessingTypeARequest : IRequest { ... }

[DataContract]
internal class ProcessingTypeBRequest : IRequest { ... }

My goal is to have concrete implementations of IRequest only exist on the client, so I would like the client and server to only communicate using interfaces. Is this even possible?

I suspect it is not possible, because a System.ServiceModel.CommunicationException always occurs at runtime with an error message similar to this:

There was an error while trying to serialize parameter request The InnerExceptionMessage was 'Type ProcessingTypeARequest with data contract name ProcessingTypeARequest is not expected. Consider using a DataContractResolver or add any types not known statically to the list of known types - for example, by using the KnownTypeAttribute attribute or by adding them to the list of known types passed to DataContractSerializer.

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2  
Clients should not be able to dictate the functionality of the Service. Otherwise, I could have a MaliciousRequest implementation that wreaks havoc on the server. –  cadrell0 Feb 17 '14 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I know, it is not possible to have an "interface-only" WCF service in the way that you describe.

The typical WCF pattern is to have the "concrete implementations of IRequest" be nothing more than data containers, with virtually no methods or business logic. The purpose of [DataContract] objects is simply to contain a list of properties that represents the data sent to or returned from the WCF call.

The WCF client comes up with its own methods or classes to handle the data until the point at which the call is made, when the client transfers the data into the (concrete) [DataContract] object to make the call. Then the client takes the object returned and transfers the data back into whatever class it wants to use to process the data.

Here's what an example might look like:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IProcessingService
{
    [OperationContract]
    ProcessingResponse Process(ProcessingRequest request);
}

[DataContract]
public class ProcessingResponse
{
    public bool Success { get; set; }
    public string Result { get; set; }
}

[DataContract]
public class ProcessingRequest
{
    public int ProcessNumber { get; set; }
    public string ProcessInput { get; set; }
}

The [ServiceContract] is an interface, where the implementation is only defined server-side. The [DataContract] members are just definitions of the parameters needed for the method call. So in this example, defining a service method as

[OperationContract]
ProcessingResponse Process(ProcessingRequest request);

is semantically equivalent to defining it as

[OperationContract]
ProcessingResponse Process(int processNumber, string processInput);

Changing the [DataContract] is semantically equivalent to changing the signature on the method, so the [DataContract] should only be changed under the same circumstances that would require IProcessingRequest to be changed as well.

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