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I have been working on making a program to open a CSV file, count the number of times the words "Info", "Low", "Medium", "High", and "Critical" appear, and have the results write to a different CSV. Down the road, I want it to be able to parse multiple CSVs that are formatted the same way for this information and write all of the results to one CSV. This is what I have so far:

import sys
import csv
import collections

severity = collections.Counter()
with open(r'C:\Report.csv', 'r') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    for row in reader:
        severity[row[3]] +=1

print(severity.most_common)
with open(r'C:\test.csv', 'a', newline='') as write_file:
    sevwrite = csv.writer(write_file, delimiter= ',',
                      quotechar=' ', quoting=csv.QUOTE_MINIMAL)
    sevwrite.writerow([severity.most_common])

It writes the full

<bound method Counter.most_common of Counter({'Info': 510, 'Medium': 30, 'Low': 24, 'High': 7, 'Severity': 1})>

into the Test.CSV file. Any help is appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to call the most_common method:

print(severity.most_common())

and

sevwrite.writerow(severity.most_common())

This won't quite write out what you want either, as the .most_common() method returns a list of tuples; each tuple a key and the corresponding count. As a result, the above sevwrite.writerow() call (without the list literal [...]) will write:

('Info', 510),('Medium', 30),('Low', 24),('High', 7),('Severity', 1)

to the file. Because .most_common() returns this list in sorted order (from highest count to lowest) a different input CSV will most likely result in a different severity ordering.

If each row in the output CSV file is to contains counts, you probably want to keep your columns in the same consistent order instead. You'll also not need to include the severity key; that'd perhaps be part of the CSV file header.

I'd use a csv.DictWriter() here instead:

with open(r'C:\test.csv', 'a', newline='') as write_file:
    sevwrite = csv.DictWriter(write_file, ('High', 'Severity', 'Medium', 'Info', 'Low'))
    sevwrite.writerow(severity)

Now only the counts will be written for each key, in the same column every time. The second argument to csv.DictWriter() sets the order the values will be written out to columns.

Note that you can simplify your reading here too:

import csv

from collections import Counter

with open(r'C:\Report.csv', 'r') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    severities = Counter(r[3] for r in reader)

is all you need to build the Counter object here.

Now, to do this for a series of input files, you could use:

import csv

from collections import Counter

with open(r'C:\test.csv', 'w', newline='') as write_file:
    sevwrite = csv.DictWriter(write_file, ('High', 'Severity', 'Medium', 'Info', 'Low'))
    sevwrite.writeheader()

    for filename in list_of_filenames:
        with open(r'C:\Report.csv', 'r') as f:
            reader = csv.reader(f)
            severities = Counter(r[3] for r in reader)
            sevwrite.writerow(severities)

Here the output file is opened for writing (not appending); this gives us the opportunity to add a header row at the top with sevwrite.writeheader().

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A nice way to get rid of the Counter loop would be: severity.update(row[3] for row in cvs.reader(f)). It's also probably better to use DictReader with the header keys instead of a hard-coded 3 index. –  Dane White Feb 17 '14 at 19:15
    
@DaneWhite: Provided there is a header row. And hard-coding 3 is no different from hardcoding a dictionary key.. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 17 '14 at 19:16
    
@Martjin: Yes, provided there is a header row. However, code dependency on the order of columns is substantially different from a dependency on a data label. The difference is that same as implementation dependency vs interface dependency. –  Dane White Feb 17 '14 at 19:31
    
Thanks so much, this helps a ton. –  RonTheBear Feb 17 '14 at 19:57

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