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Is there a way of creating a hash key that can be used by our different servers for decrypting connection strings in web.config, and how would I do that? Any pointers?

Thanks for the help! // Peter

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are 2 options, if it's in-house and you want all machines to do things the same, then a machine.config syncing would be best. You'll want a random key you generate, but here's the example element you want to change:

<machineKey  
validationKey="21F090935F6E49C2C797F69BBAAD8402ABD2EE0B667A8B44EA7DD4374267A75D7
               AD972A119482D15A4127461DB1DC347C1A63AE5F1CCFAACFF1B72A7F0A281B"           
decryptionKey="ABAA84D7EC4BB56D75D217CECFFB9628809BDB8BF91CFCD64568A145BE59719F"
validation="SHA1"
decryption="AES"
/>

To generate cryptographically random keys:

Use the RNGCryptoServiceProvider class to generate a cryptographically strong random number. Choose an appropriate key size. The recommended key lengths are as follows:

  • For SHA1, set the validationKey to 64 bytes (128 hexadecimal characters).
  • For AES, set the decryptionKey to 32 bytes (64 hexadecimal characters).
  • For 3DES, set the decryptionKey to 24 bytes (48 hexadecimal characters).

Since the first question I had when doing this the first time...here's an example of how to do the generation, do it once and apply to all machines: How to create keys by using Visual C# .NET

Option 2: If you're not in that situation and you need it at the web.config level, then see How To: Encrypt Configuration Sections in ASP.NET 2.0 Using RSA ion MSDN

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Superb, but this gave me a follow up question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2200329/… –  Peter Evjan Feb 4 '10 at 14:36

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