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This question was asked in an interview. I could not answer! So getting some help here to understand the logic. i.e. how to put space between a number string and character string.

Given the string "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" what command you use to get following result -

"1 abc 2 abcd 3 efghi 10 z 11 jkl 100 pqrs"

Thanks in advance.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is another -- yet simple -- way to think about it:

echo "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" | \
 sed -r 's/([0-9])([a-zA-Z])/\1 \2/g; s/([a-zA-Z])([0-9])/\1 \2/g'
  • add a whitespace between a digit-letter string & letter-digit string
  • () is to capture the group and \1 and \2 is to return the first and second captured group
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Sir. It worked. – user1149518 Feb 18 '14 at 9:42

With GNU sed:

$ echo "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" | sed -e 's/[0-9]\+/ & /g' -e 's/^ \| $//'
1 abc 2 abcd 3 efghi 10 z 11 jkl 100 pqrs

With awk:

$ echo "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" | awk '{gsub(/[0-9]+/," & ",$0); $1=$1}1'
1 abc 2 abcd 3 efghi 10 z 11 jkl 100 pqrs
  • gsub with substitute all numbers with space before and after it.
  • $1=$1 will re-compute entire line and add OFS (by default single space)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. It works. – user1149518 Feb 17 '14 at 22:50
    
@user1149518 Added an awk solution as well. – jaypal singh Feb 17 '14 at 23:14

I would have chosen over :

echo "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" | sed 's/[0-9]\+/ & /g; s/^[ ]//; s/[ ]$//'

It surrounds each run of digits with spaces and afterwards removes the (possibly) leading and trailing ones.

It yields:

1 abc 2 abcd 3 efghi 10 z 11 jkl 100 pqrs
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. It works. – user1149518 Feb 17 '14 at 22:50
    
@mklement0: Thanks for the edit. – Birei Feb 17 '14 at 23:26
    
@Birei: You're welcome - actually messed it up a bit; hopefully corrected now... – mklement0 Feb 18 '14 at 2:58
    
Now you are 20K, zorionak! If I remember properly, I also upvoted to your 10K :) – fedorqui Feb 19 '14 at 9:39
1  
@fedorqui: Muchas gracias fedorqui!! It was hard to reach this number, and I struggled a little bit at the end :-) but those upvotes helped a lot. Thanks. – Birei Feb 19 '14 at 14:00
echo 1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs | \
    sed -r -e 's/([[:digit:]]+)/ \1 /g' -e 's/^ *//g' -e 's/ *$//g'

Take the expression -e 's/([[:digit:]]+)/ \1 /g' first.

The parentheses around [[:digit:]]+ 'capture' each sequence of one or more digits. Since it's the first capture group, it's referenced in the substitution by \1 (then there's the space before and after:  \1 ).

The g tells sed to perform this substitution 'globally' on the input.

The -r before the expression tells sed to use extended regular expressions.

The other two 'expressions' (each expression has -e before it to show that it's an expression): -e 's/^ *//g' will remove leading whitespace, and -e 's/ *$//g' will remove trailing whitespace.

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Thanks a lot. It works. – user1149518 Feb 17 '14 at 22:51
1  
+1 for the explanation; OSX users: use -E instead of -r. – mklement0 Feb 18 '14 at 3:45

Using perl:

echo 1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs | perl -F'(\d+)' -ane \
    '$F[0] and print "@F\n" or print "@F[1..$#F]"'

Some explanation:

  • -an together tells Perl to split each line of input and put the resulting fields into the array @F.
  • -F specifies a delimiter of one or more digits to use with -an to split the input. The parentheses cause the delimiters themselves to be stored in the array, not just the strings they separate.
  • -e specifies the code to run after each line is read. We simply want to print the contents of @F, with the default field separator (space) used to separate elements of the array. The and...or combination is used to ignore the first field if it is empty, as it will be if the input line starts with a delimiter.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. It works. – user1149518 Feb 17 '14 at 23:40
    
Thanks to ALL. I think this is kind of optimum which I derived from all your answers! $ echo "1abc2abcd3efghi10z11jkl100pqrs" | sed 's/[a-z]\+/ & /g' 1 abc 2 abcd 3 efghi 10 z 11 jkl 100 pqrs – user1149518 Feb 19 '14 at 2:19

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